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All your tubeless tyre choices

Want to go tubeless? Here are all your options in tyres.

Tubeless tyres are gradually gaining popularity as more riders become convinced that their improved ride and increased resistance to punctures are worth the cost of new wheels and tyres and the sometimes problematic fitting process. If you’re about to make the switch, here’s a look at your tyre options.

When tubeless tyres for road wheels first appeared you had very few choices. Hutchinson made tyres, Shimano and Stan’s NoTubes made wheels and conversion kits and, er, that was it. Now many tyre makers offer tubeless options, though Michelin and Continental are notable hold-outs.

Read more: How to fit a tubeless tyre
Read more: Road tubeless: everything you need to know — including how to convert

Bontrager

Bontrager R3.jpeg

Bontrager R3

Bontrager offers a range of three tyres badged Tubeless Ready, which means what you need to get them working is sealant and either Bontrager’s special rim strips if you have Bontrager wheels, or other tubeless compatible wheels and valves. In ascending order of raciness, they’re the AW2, R2 and R3. We’ve tested and liked the latter as part of the Bontrager Road TLR Upgrade Kit.

Read our review of the Bontrager R3 Tubeless Ready
Read our review of the Bontrager Road TLR Upgrade Kit
Read our review of the Bontrager CX3 Team Issue TLR Cyclocross Tyres
Read our review of the Bontrager GR1 TLR Team Issue Gravel
Read our review of the Bontrager GR2 TLR Team Issue Gravel

Find a Bontrager dealer


Tyre Claimed weight Price
Bontrager GR2 TLR Team Issue Gravel 440g (40mm) £34.19
Bontrager GR1 TLR Team Issue Gravel 430g (40mm) £49.99
Bontrager R2 TLR 235g (25mm) £27.00
Bontrager R3 TLR 200g (25mm) £38.49
Bontrager CX0 TLR 395g (33mm) £36.99
Bontrager CX3 TLR 405g (33mm) £36.99
Bontrager LT2 TLR 395g (32mm), 475g (38mm) £29.52
Bontrager AW2 360g (26mm) £27.00

Compass

Compass Barlow Pass TC tyre.jpg

Compass Barlow Pass TC

Compass Cycles grew out of the magazine Bicycle Quarterly, founded in 2002 by Jan Heine, a Seattle-based long-distance cyclist and journalist. Heine contends that wide, supple tyres perform better in every respect than skinny tyres, and perform better than would be expected from rolling resistance twsts performed on smooth steel drums. And he's put his money on it with a line of tyres that includes tubeless models.

Read our review of Compass Cycles Barlow Pass tyres

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Snoqualmie Pass TC 44mm 378g/329g £58/£72
Barlow Pass TC 38mm 430g/380g £56/£70
Steilacoom TC 38mm 423g/370g £58/£72
Bon Jon Pass TC 35mm 355g/303g £56/£70
Switchback Hill TC 650B x 48mm 478g/413g £60/£75
Babyshoe Pass TC 650B x 42mm 410g/373g £58/£72
Pumpkin Ridge TC 650B x 42mm 480g/418g £60/£74

Continental

Continental GP5000 Tubeless tyres16.JPG

Conti was one of the last two major tyre makers to hold out against tubeless, but late in 2018 announced a new tyre, the Grand Prix 5000, to succeed the much-loved Grand Prix 4000S II, and as well as regular clinchers there are tubeless versions too.

And they were worth the wait. The Grand Prix 5000 tubeless tyre takes everything that is improved with this latest generation tyre and adds tubeless compatibility for improved puncture resistance. They're relatively painless to set up and provide excellent performance in all conditions with low rolling resistance, good grip and durability.

Read our review of the Continental Grand Prix 5000 TL

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Continental Grand Prix 5000 TL 300g (25mm), 340g (28mm), 380g (32mm), 290g (650B) £48.35

 

Donnelly

Donnelly X'Plor MSO tyres 2.jpg

Donnelly is the new name for the tyres formerly known as Clement, after Clement brand owner Pirelli decided to return to the tyre sector. Donnelly specialises in cyclocross tyres—all the 33mm tyres in the range are for cyclocross—but has a decent selection of fat rubber for gravel and bad roads too.

Tyre Claimed weight Price
BOS 700C 456g (33mm) £34.99
MXP 650B 430g (33mm) £34.99
MXP 700C 446g (33mm) £46.95
PDX 700C 426g (33mm) £50.00
Strada USH 650B 472g (36mm), 536g (42mm), 644g (50mm) £51.99-£65.00
Strada USH 700C 338g (32mm), 562 (40mm) £51.99-£65.00
X'Plor MSO 650B 532g (42mm), 670g (50mm) £19.99
X'Plor MSO 700C 420g (30mm), 532g (40mm), 794g (50mm) £58.50

Ere Research

ere_research_genus_tyre.jpg
Ere Research Genus

Ere REesearch CEO Piet van der Velde has almost three decades in the bike industry, most recently as product director of saddle maker Selle Italia before founding Ere Research in 2017. The company launched with an extensive range of tyres, with tubeless versions of almost all models, and some — the Tempus tyres for time trials — only available in a tubeless format.

Read our review of the Ere Research Genus

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Genus 235g (24mm) 242g (26mm) 268g (28mm) £60.99
Omnia 248g (24mm) 255g (26mm) 283g (28mm) 308g (30mm) £35.00
Tenaci 360g (30mm) 394g (32mm) 408g (36mm) n/a (40mm) £60.99
Pontus 255g (24mm) 276g (26mm) £51.99
Tempus 255g (26mm) 291g (28mm) £52.99

 

Giant

GIANT GAVIA SLR 1.jpg
Giant Gavia SLR 1

The world's biggest bike manufacturer has switched to tubeless tyres and wheels on large swathe of its recent models. Giant has come up with a ten-model range that covers a full range of applications from racing to messing about in the dirt.

Find a Giant dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Giant Gavia SL 1 300g (25mm) £39.99
Giant Gavia SLR 1 255g (25mm) £49.99
Giant Gavia Race 1 255g (25mm) £39.99
Giant Gavia Race 0 307g (25mm) £49.99
Giant Gavia AC 0 278g (25mm), 302g (28mm) £49.99
Giant Gavia AC 1 330g (25mm), 373g (28mm) £39.99
Giant Gavia AC 2 411g (25mm), 441g (28mm) £29.99
Giant Crosscut Tour 2 553g (30mm) £29.99
Giant Crosscut AT 2 673g (38mm) £24.99
Giant Crosscut Gravel 2 573g (40mm), 705g (45mm), 725g (50mm) £29.99

Goodyear

goodyear_eagle_all-season_tubeless_road_tyre_700x28.jpg

Goodyear announced a return to bicycle tyres in 2018 with a range that includes what the company describes as 'Tubeless Complete' tyres, which have "tubeless specific bead and casings, allowing for easy installation and superior air retention". With a tyre carcass that's impenetrable to sealant but not airtight, Tubeless Complete is a sort of halfway house between Road Tubeless, which has an air-retaining coat of butyl rubber on the inside of the tyre and Tubeless Ready, which has a standard tyre carcass. Goodyear recommends the use of sealant to make sure the bead is properly seals against the rim, and says sealant won't seep through the Tubeless Complete carcass so it will still all be there when you need it to fix a puncture.

Read our review of the Goodyear Eagle All Season

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Eagle All Season 300g (25mm), 316g (28mm), 326g (30mm), 377g (32mm) £42.00 - £45.99
Transit Speed 565g (35mm), 626g (40mm), 769g (50mm) £50.00
Transit Tour 722g (650B x 50mm), 565g (35mm), 626g (40mm), 769g (50mm) £40.99
County 526g (Premium 35mm), 441g (Ultimate 35mm) ~£42.00
Connector 542g (Premium 40mm), 463g (Ultimate 40mm) ~£40.00

Hutchinson

Hutchinson Sector 28 tubeless tyre

Hutchinson Sector 28

Hutchinson launched tubeless tyres for road bikes back in 2006, so it’s no surprise the French tyre maker has a fairly big range. While most tyre makers have gone down the Tubeless Ready route with lightweight tyres that need sealant to keep the air in, Hutchinson also makes tyres to the original Road Tubeless spec, sealed with a coating of rubber inside the tyre.

Hutchinson's flagship tubeless tyre is the Fusion 5, which is available in a number of variants. There are Tubeless Ready versions that need sealant, and Road Tubeless versions that, on paper, don't need sealant, but that everyone uses sealant with anyway just to be safe. Both Road Tubeless and Tubeless Ready versions are available in Galactik, Performance and All Season variants.

Galactik is the lightest version, intended for racing; Performance is the all-rounder with a slightly thicker tread and All Season is more durable, with a thicker tread and grooves to allegedly disperse water in wet conditions. Road Tubeless Fusion 5s come in 23mm and 25mm widths, Tubeless Ready in 25mm, plus 28mm in Performance and All Season.

All Fusion 5s use Hutchinson's ElevenStorm rubber which provides very low rolling resistance and buckets of grip. Tubeless Ready versions have Hutchinson's Hardskin bead-to-bead protection to reduce cuts and punctures. Galactik Road Tubeless tyres have a light reinforcement under the tread, while Performance and All Season Road Tubeless tyres get extra protection in the form of a Kevlar band.

Read our review of the Hutchinson Intensive Road Tubeless tyres
Read our review of the Hutchinson Fusion 2 tubeless tyres
Read our review of the Hutchinson Sector 28 tubeless tyres

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Tubeless Ready All Season 260g (25mm) £34.00
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Tubeless Ready Performance 255g (25mm) £25.00
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Tubeless Ready Galactik 240g (25mm) £45.00
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Road Tubeless All Season 325g (25mm) £40.18
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Road Tubeless Performance 315g (25mm) £34.99
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Road Tubeless Galactik 285g (25mm) £54.99
Hutchinson Fusion 3 Road Tubeless 300g (25mm) £44.18
Hutchinson Intensive 2 Road Tubeless 315g (25mm) £41.99
Hutchinson Sector 28 Tubeless Ready 295g (28mm) £36.99

IRC

IRC Pro Tubeless.jpg

IRC Formula Pro Tubeless

IRC makes several tubeless or tubeless ready tyres, but they’re very rare in the UK; we’ve only been able to find one source. That’s a pity as IRC has been pushing road tubeless technology to make tyres lighter and faster. The Pro Tubeless tyres have internal coating based on latex rubber rather than synthetic butyl. That makes for lower rolling resistance, just as a regular clincher tyre is faster with a latex inner tube than a butyl one.

Read our review of the Formula Pro Tubeless RBCC
Read our review of the Formula Pro Tubeless X-Guard

Tyre Claimed weight Price
IRC Formula Pro Tubeless Light 285g (25mm) £62.00
IRC Formula Pro Tubeless RBCC 310g (25mm) £55.00
IRC Roadlite Tubeless 340g (25mm) £45.00
IRC Formula Pro Fusion X-guard Tubeless 300g/340g (25mm/28mm) £55.00

Kenda

Kenda Kommandox Pro Tubeless Ready Tyre.jpg

Kenda Kommando X Pro

Kenda's line of tubeless-ready tyres focuses on gravel and cyclocross tyres, with just one road tyre, the Valkyrie. They're designated KSCT, for Kenda Sealant-Compatible Tyre. Some models seem to be quite hard to find in the UK, but we've been broadly impressed by the Kenda gravel tyres we've tested.

Read our review of the Kenda Cholla Pro
Read our review of the Kenda Kommando X Pro
Read our review of the Kenda Flintridge Pro
Read our review of the Kenda Alluvium Pro

Find a Kenda dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Kenda Alluvium Pro 558g (45mm), 495g (40mm) ~£35.00
Flintridge Pro 515g (40mm) 481 (35mm) £36.99
Cholla Pro 428g (33mm) £33.42
Happy Medium Pro 435g (32mm) 496g (35mm) 556g (42mm) £36.82
Small Block Eight Pro 427g (37mm) 404g (32mm) ~£15.00
Slant Six Pro 522g (32mm) 591g (45mm) NA
Kommando X Pro 364g (32mm) £33.00
Valkyrie 234g (23mm) 252g (25mm) 283g (28mm) 327g (30mm) £55.00

Maxxis

Maxxis Re-Fuse.jpg

Maxxis is known for mountain bike tyres, but also offers tubeless-ready tyres in a wide range of sizes and applications, plus a tubeless tyre that doesn't need sealant.

Find a Maxxis dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Padrone TR (ISO 622/700C) 250g (23mm), 260g (25mm), 300g (28mm) £34.99 - £45.01
Radiale TL (ISO 622/700C) 280g (22mm), 305g (24mm) ~£68.00
Re-Fuse TR (ISO 622/700C)   390g (32mm), 520g (40mm) £35.99
Re-Fuse TR (ISO 584/650B) 610g (50mm) £35.99
Rambler TR (ISO 622/700C) 380g (38mm/120tpi), 415g (38mm/60tpi), 375g (40mm/120tpi), 420g (40mm/60tpi) £45.76
Ravager (ISO 622/700C) 485g (40mm/120tpi), 530g (40mm/60tpi) £47.99

Mavic

Mavic Yksion Pro UST Clincher Tyre

Mavic Yksion Pro UST

Mavic jumped into the road tubeless sector with both boots in summer 2017, announcing a new standard — Road UST — and a big range of wheels. The accompanying tyre offerings are a bit thin at the moment — the Yksion Pro UST in 25mm and 28mm widths — but Mavic clearly anticipates other manufacturers adopting the standard when it's been ratified by the relevant international bodies.

Mavic still offers its all-purpose/gravel tyre in the old Road Tubeless standard, the 30mm Yksion Elite Allroad.

Find a Mavic dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Mavic Yksion Elite AllRoad 330g (30mm) £42.00
Yksion Pro UST NA ~£40.00

Panaracer

Panaracer Race A Evo 3 tubeless tyre.jpeg

Panaracer Race A Evo 3

Panaracer has joined the tubeless fray with the Race A Evo 3 Tubeless. The Japanese tyre maker has developed a brand new bead which it claims allows the tyre to be inflated using just a hand pump and claims this tyre increases puncture resistance by 24% compared to the previous Evo 2 tyre, thanks to a new Protite puncture proof material. The tread compound is also claimed to improve cornering performance.

Read our review of the Panaracer Race A Evo 3 tubeless
Read our review of the Panaracer GravelKing Slick Tread 38

Find a Panaracer dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
GravelKing Slick Tread 310g (32mm), 330g (38mm) £28.99
Panaracer Race A Evo 3 280g (23mm) ~£60.00

Pirelli

Pirelli_Cinturato_Velo_Tyre_Fitted_1.jpg

After returning to bicycle tyres with the P Zero clincher series, Pirelli has recently added tubeless-ready rubber to the range. Our Stu Kerton was impressed, calling the Cinturato "a very good tyre, especially during these winter months, offering plenty of cold and wet weather grip while also providing loads of puncture proofing. The small cost to the rolling resistance is worth it for the durability too."

Read our review of the Pirelli Cinturato

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Cinturato 290g (26mm), 320g (28mm), 350g (32mm), 390g (35mm) £39.00

 

 

Ritchey

ritchey_wcs_alpine_jb_120tpi_tlr_stronghold_tyre.jpg
Ritchey Alpine JB

Ritchey has just one model of tubeless tyre, the 35mm version of the Alpine JB. We liked the non-tubeless 30mm equivalent, so for dirt road riding, the Alpine JB is well worth a look.

Find a Ritchey dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
WCS Alpine JB Stronghold 35mm 400g ~£41.00

Find a Ritchey dealer

Schwalbe

ProOne_Close_up

Schwalbe ProOne

Schwalbe says “The future will be tubeless” in its latest blurb for the Schwalbe Pro One tyre, which it claims is its best tubeless tyre ever. We tested the slightly less advanced One Tubeless recently and found it rode brilliantly and, unlike many tubeless tyres, it was easy to get on the rim and to then pop into place on the bead seat.

Schwalbe offers a total of seven ‘Tubeless Easy’ tyres, from the Pro One, which is being reliably reported as having a super-low rolling resistance, to the aptly named Big One, a 60mm tyre intended for mountain bike beach racing but which we’ve included in case anyone’s thinking of building up a ‘monster-cross’ bike.

Read our review of the Schwalbe One Tubeless
Read our review of the Schwalbe Pro One Tubeless
Read our review of the Schwalbe S-One Tubeless

Find a Schwalbe dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Schwalbe Pro One 255g (25mm) £66.99
Schwalbe X-One 370g (33mm) £49.99
Schwalbe G-One Speed 330g (30mm) £41.99
Schwalbe G-One Allround 400g (35mm) £34.99
Schwalbe Big One 530g (60mm) ~£32.00
Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 595g (40mm) £34.99
Schwalbe Marathon Almotion 655g (40mm) ~£32.00

Specialized

Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless.jpg

Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless

Until recently, Specialized has focused on endurance and cyclo-cross riding with its Tubeless Ready tyres, which it spells 2Bliss because — well, who knows. Californians, eh?

Specialized also makes a Road Tubeless version of its S-Works Turbo tyre. The 26mm version of this tyre recently won a rolling resistance test against a range of standard and tubeless tyres, and looks promising as a fast tyre for UK riding.

Read our review of the Specialized Trigger Pro 2Bliss Ready

Find a Specialized dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless 295g (25mm) £49.00
Specialized Terra Pro 2Bliss Ready 370g (33mm) £40.00
Specialized Tracer Pro 2Bliss Ready 365g (33mm) £40.00
Specialized Trigger Pro 2Bliss Ready 490g (38mm) £42.00
Specialized S-Works Turbo Tubeless Ready 240g (24mm) £28.00
Specialized Sawtooth 2Bliss Ready 615g (42mm) £21.00
Pathfinder Pro 2Bliss Ready   £42.00
Roubaix Pro 2Bliss Ready 375g (30mm) £31.00

Vittoria

Vittoria Corsa Speed (Open TLR).jpg

Vittoria makes the big claim that its Corsa Speed graphene technology tyre is the fastest ever independently measured, and the lightest tubeless-ready tyre too. A dirt tyre, the Terreno Zero TNT G2.0 has recently joined the range.

Read our review of the Vittoria Corsa Speed G+ Isotech
Read our review of the Vittoria Terreno Zero TNT G2.0

Find a Vittoria dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Vittoria Terreno Zero TNT G2.0 510g (40mm), 435g (35mm), 380g (32mm), 560g (650B) £40.99
Corsa Speed (Open TLR) 205g (23mm) £40.00

WTB

WTB Horizon tyres - 1.jpg

WTB are known for mountain bike tyres so it's no surprise that they specialise in fat 650B rubber for mixed-surface antics or, as they more prosaically call it Road Plus. The range also includes cyclo-cross and road tyres.

Read our review of the WTB ByWay
Read our review of the WTB Horizon

Find a WTB dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
WTB ByWay 535g (47mm 650B) ~£37.00
WTB Horizon TCS 515g (47mm 650B) £35.99
WTB Resolute TCS 450g (42mm) £33.99
WTB Sendero TCS 530g (47mm 650B) £39.99
WTB Exposure TCS Road 310g (30mm), 315g (32mm), 370g (34mm) £40.00
WTB Nano TCS 530g (40mm) £30.99
WTB Cross Boss TCS 400g (35mm) £27.74
WTB Crosswolf TCS 392g (32mm) £29.99

 

Zipp

Zipp Tangente Speed RT28 Tubeless Clincher.jpg

Wheel maker Zipp — part of the SRAM group — offers the Tangente Speed tubeless tyre in two sizes, 25mm and 28mm. We found them easy to install and fast-rolling, but they're expensive.

Read our review of the Zipp Tangente RT28

Find a Zipp dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Tangente RT25 292g £66.00
Tangente RT28 302g £58.00
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Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

53 comments

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2687 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

I run tubeless on a lot of my wheels, theyre great.  The most valuable aspect, is if you have a puncture, it wont rapid deflate, (my recent descent of Mt. Teide @ 40+mph) which can be a disaster at the wrong time.  I also use sealant in my tubular continental tyres.  I did a 60 mile ride and only noticed at the finish that i had a thorn/glass puncture.  It had self sealed without any issue.  Tubeless also has the benefit of running lower pressure for comfort

Avatar
Ghostyjack [3 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I've got Sector 28's on my Hunt 4 Seasons Carbon and they pretty pretty nice to ride.

Looking to put some tubleless on my other bike, it can only take a 25mm, which it fine, but I was hoping to get some skin/tan-wall tyres for it.

Anyone know of any 25mm tkin/tan-wall tubless tyres?

Avatar
risoto [105 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

There seems to be a lot of 'marketing' going here as with other new tech. It's an expensive solution but perhaps well suited to certain segments, eg MTB and perhaps gravel. Same with disc brakes. More expensive and hassle in installation and maintenance. For both new tech solution - little to no benefits or value for money. The 2-3 punctures I get every year, one for about every 1,000 miles, are mended on the road in a couple of minutes. I save time on installing and pumping the tires much more often. The last 'hyped' tech I will mention is using wax instead of lube. Might have some advantages although I haven't seen any proof. No pro teams use any of these technologies....

Avatar
Jimmy Ray Will [1029 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I've pinch flatted an MTB tubeless tyre. Hugely annoying as the sealant really struggles to seal it. 

Buy struggle, I mean that it didn't seal it. Patched it in the end, which saved the tyre, but having a patch so close to the bead caused its own problems with sealing. 

In summary, its something you can definitely do, much harder with tubeless than with tubed, but still a possibility. 

Avatar
kevvjj [476 posts] 1 year ago
1 like
risoto wrote:

There seems to be a lot of 'marketing' going here as with other new tech. It's an expensive solution but perhaps well suited to certain segments, eg MTB and perhaps gravel. Same with disc brakes. More expensive and hassle in installation and maintenance. For both new tech solution - little to no benefits or value for money. The 2-3 punctures I get every year, one for about every 1,000 miles, are mended on the road in a couple of minutes. I save time on installing and pumping the tires much more often. The last 'hyped' tech I will mention is using wax instead of lube. Might have some advantages although I haven't seen any proof. No pro teams use any of these technologies....

Feel free to ignore the 'marketing'.

If you can change change a tube in two minutes, well done (but I doubt you can).

Disc brakes.. more maintentance? Now, I'm laughing.

I pump my (tubeless road, gravel and MTB) tyres up once per week - as i did before I got rid of the tubes.

I have no idea where you got the 'wax' as hyped tech idea from - my father used to wax way back in the 60s. Pro teams are using special coatings on their chains now (as well as disc brakes). Some pro teams are even using tubeless clinchers instead of tubs.

Avatar
paulrattew [306 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I've recently changed from running Schwalbe Pro One tyres to Hutchinson Fusion 5 Tubeless Ready Performance tyres (not the 11 storm compound), due to the schwalbe tyres getting to the end of their useful life. At first I was really impressed with how they felt, the grip and the speed. With the Pro One tyres I was able to take them off and put them over and over, gently (very gently) using tyre levers where necessary. No issues at all. It seems though that the fusion 5s have a really fragile tyre bead. One removal of the rear fusion 5 and it looks like the bead is now useless as the tyre blows off the rim at 80psi (25mm version).

They’re actually the first tubeless tyre I’ve had this problem with (I’ve been running tubeless since 2012), so it was a bit of a shock and a disappointment. I’ve got a replacement (this time the 11storm compound) on the way so I’ll see if that fairs any better. If not then it will be back to the schwalbes no matter how nice the hutchinsons feel

Avatar
Plasterer's Radio [546 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I'm a bit puzzled by the Hutchinson line up. Can anyone advise, please?

The, obstensibly, same tyre in the Fusion range has 2 options (plus normal clincher)

The Tubeless Ready & Road Tubeless versions!!

The Road Tubeless has a butyl inner that adds 60+g/tyre and does not need sealant.

Can anyone explain why i would choose this over a lighter (and cheaper from what i've seen at Evans cycles) Tubeless Ready varient of the same tyre? Will it seal punctures without the sealant? Seems unlikely.

Avatar
kevvjj [476 posts] 1 year ago
1 like
Plasterer's Radio wrote:

I'm a bit puzzled by the Hutchinson line up. Can anyone advise, please?

The, obstensibly, same tyre in the Fusion range has 2 options (plus normal clincher)

The Tubeless Ready & Road Tubeless versions!!

The Road Tubeless has a butyl inner that adds 60+g/tyre and does not need sealant.

Can anyone explain why i would choose this over a lighter (and cheaper from what i've seen at Evans cycles) Tubeless Ready varient of the same tyre? Will it seal punctures without the sealant? Seems unlikely.

Tubeless Ready needs sealant to work at all. Road Tubeless doesn't need sealant to work.

However, Road Tubeless still needs sealant in order to be effective at sealing small punctures such as thorns, glass etc. Without the sealant, Road Tubeless will deflate much slower than a tubed tyres though. You might choose Road Tubless over Tubeless Ready because Road Tubelss is much easier to seat on the (tubeless) rim - for the most part a decent track pump will suffice. Tubless Ready often need a 'pressure tank' such as Airshot to get them to seat and seal. Finally, Road Tubeless will be more puncture resistant than Tubeless Ready because of that extra layer of butyl rubber.

Avatar
Plasterer's Radio [546 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
kevvjj wrote:
Plasterer's Radio wrote:

I'm a bit puzzled by the Hutchinson line up. Can anyone advise, please?

The, obstensibly, same tyre in the Fusion range has 2 options (plus normal clincher)

The Tubeless Ready & Road Tubeless versions!!

The Road Tubeless has a butyl inner that adds 60+g/tyre and does not need sealant.

Can anyone explain why i would choose this over a lighter (and cheaper from what i've seen at Evans cycles) Tubeless Ready varient of the same tyre? Will it seal punctures without the sealant? Seems unlikely.

Tubeless Ready needs sealant to work at all. Road Tubeless doesn't need sealant to work.

However, Road Tubeless still needs sealant in order to be effective at sealing small punctures such as thorns, glass etc. Without the sealant, Road Tubeless will deflate much slower than a tubed tyres though. You might choose Road Tubless over Tubeless Ready because Road Tubelss is much easier to seat on the (tubeless) rim - for the most part a decent track pump will suffice. Tubless Ready often need a 'pressure tank' such as Airshot to get them to seat and seal. Finally, Road Tubeless will be more puncture resistant than Tubeless Ready because of that extra layer of butyl rubber.

Thank you!

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zozzi [4 posts] 1 year ago
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Hello guys,

what's the correct pressure for Mavic 25mm tubeless tyres on Ksyrium wheels with 100+kg rider ?

I think that 7bars should be enough for 80kilos, but I have total of 110kg with bike   3

Thanks,
Pete
 

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Boss Hogg [143 posts] 1 year ago
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Yksion Pro UST claimed weight is 260g. The ones I bought were 255g. Excellent tyre, one of the fastest, highly recommended.

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CXR94Di2 [2687 posts] 1 year ago
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zozzi wrote:

Hello guys,

what's the correct pressure for Mavic 25mm tubeless tyres on Ksyrium wheels with 100+kg rider ?

I think that 7bars should be enough for 80kilos, but I have total of 110kg with bike   3

Thanks,
Pete
 

You need to move upto 30mm+ tubeless tyres or move over to tubular so you can run much higher pressure to offset small size.

Tubeless run lower pressure compared to inner tubes. go bigger tyre and ride at recommended pressure for your weight

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Milkfloat [87 posts] 1 year ago
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zozzi wrote:

Hello guys,

what's the correct pressure for Mavic 25mm tubeless tyres on Ksyrium wheels with 100+kg rider ?

I think that 7bars should be enough for 80kilos, but I have total of 110kg with bike   3

Thanks,
Pete
 

 

Tubeless allows a lot low pressure to be used, you should be fine down to 6.2 bar quite easily.  Start at 7 and see how you go. 

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terrycojones [37 posts] 1 year ago
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I'm a tubeless convert too, though it took some time to learn about them. One trick to help reduce the slow leakage is to take the wheel off, pump the tire up to high pressure (80+) and slosh the sealant (I put in enough so that I can hear it) around a lot with the wheel held flat. Lie it down like that for hours or overnight, do that on the other side too. The idea is that if there's a slow leak under lower pressure, you can speed the leak up under high pressure and give the sealant a better chance to get in there. Make sure to deflate your tires to the recommended max pressure or below before riding on them  1

I'm running Compass Barlow Pass right now and they're great. I first got the thin walled ones but wound up with about 20(!) small holes in the front tire wall after some really nasty broken off-road (well, former road that had washed away) in Wales. But the tire kept going. In the end it was too hard to keep that tire inflated (despite my advice above) and I put it aside to use with a tube someday.

Tubless is certainly more faff, one way or another. But the peace of mind out on the road easily makes up for it. It doesn't even cross my mind that I might puncture. The first time you do and you hear the short hiss and feel a bit of sealant spraying out, and then it stops..... magic!  1

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vorsprung [292 posts] 1 year ago
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This blog article I wrote a couple of years ago is still pretty much an accurate summary of tubeless "issues".  I just updated it

https://audaxing.wordpress.com/2016/12/24/whats-so-great-about-tubeless-tyres/

I don't mention in the article that tubeless tyres are usually fantastically fast and always more comfortable than clinchers

 

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fukawitribe [2864 posts] 10 months ago
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vorsprung wrote:

This blog article I wrote a couple of years ago is still pretty much an accurate summary of tubeless "issues".  I just updated it

There are a number of factual issues with the the first few paragraphs i've read - could I  suggest maybe looking at the use of the word 'require' ?

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John Stevenson [445 posts] 10 months ago
2 likes

fukawitribe wrote:

vorsprung wrote:

This blog article I wrote a couple of years ago is still pretty much an accurate summary of tubeless "issues".  I just updated it

There are a number of factual issues with the the first few paragraphs i've read - could I  suggest maybe looking at the use of the word 'require' ?

Agreed. In reviewing some wheels recently I fitted tubeless tyres from two different manufacturers, Hutchinson and Schwalbe. Neither required tools to fit and both inflated with just a track pump, though the Schwalbe needed very vigorous pumping and the job would have been much easier with a compressor or air tank.

Reviewing Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST wheels, Stu Kerton was able to easily fit both Mavic tyres (made by Hutchinson) and Ere Research tyres.

The fit problems vorsprung alludes to in that blog have been solved.

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Team EPO [216 posts] 10 months ago
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Dear Road CC  when you review tyres can you score them for ease (or lack of) of fitting?

 

PS Thanks for the really sueful list and everyones comments above

 

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DoctorFish [214 posts] 8 months ago
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Anyone tried the Pirelli Cinturato VELO TLR?  Not mentioned in the article above but seems to be a good tyre?

 

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Vovis [26 posts] 5 months ago
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The list of tyres was updated on Martch 21th 2019.

Why you didn't include Grand Prix 5000TL?

Any experience with the new model from Continentals so far?

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steviewevie [60 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Road.cc, you might want to edit the intro to remove the now-outdated reference to Continental being a "notable no-show".

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Panslanepaul [18 posts] 1 week ago
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Has anyone else had experience of Hutchinson Sectors? I bought some in the new 32 width (not on this list) in January and immediately noticed some traction issues on the rear from the smooth centre section. I didn't pay enough attention to this and found myself literally flat on my face while making a right turn at low speed when the front wheel let go with no warning on a lightly damp road, I didn't even ride on the markings. One facial fracture and about £100 of bike damage was the result. To be fair Wiggle refunded the cost of the tyres when I pressed them on the basis of the tyres being unfit for use. I have had no response from Hutchinson when I emailed them about the quality issue So I have a hardly used pair of Sector 32 tyres that road.cc is welcome to test for rolling resistance if they wish.

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ktache [1957 posts] 4 days ago
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I was out doing a 25 mile mostly off road around Henley today.  Lovely weather.  There had been a lot of hedge cutting, or slashing really, and after a bit of farm tracks I got back onto tarmac and there was something in my front tyre, whack, whack, whack, stopped and thought there was a small twig stuck in the tread, pulled it and one end was stuck in the tyre, pulled it more , a loss of air and  some orangey latex oozed out, a few bubbles and sealed in 20-30 seconds.

Checked the rear, big thorn, needed tools to get it out, sealed very quick, another thorn, smaller, hadn't quite made it through.

I was very glad to have had my new bike set up tubeless, LBS did everything, probably Orange Seal, the long lasting one.  If I had been running tubes, after changing 2 and a lot of pumping I would have cut my ride short, anxious about not having a spare and all the faff.  I will add an extra squirt in a couple of days.

By the way, what did I experience 2 of today?  Definitely not a flat, and it didn't seem like the p-word.  Any suggestions?

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