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Telegraph admits publishing "erroneous" Strava data — corrects story claiming "death trap" cyclists are hitting "52mph" while chasing London segments; Giro d'Italia helmet row; Richmond Park Strava segment flagged as hazardous + more on the live blog

It's the Wednesday live blog and Dan Alexander is on duty again (apologies if you're getting sick of me)... we've got more Giro coverage, news, reaction and more for you as we creep closer to a bank holiday weekend...
22 May 2024, 16:36
Telegraph admits publishing "erroneous" Strava data — corrects story claiming "death trap" cyclists are hitting "52mph" while chasing London segments

The Telegraph has removed figures from its story published on Friday claiming that "Lycra lout cyclists are creating death traps all over Britain", the piece justified with dodgy GPS data incorrectly suggesting cyclists were hitting speeds of 52 mph in London.

> Telegraph journalists told "check your research" after front page claims cyclists hit 52mph chasing London Strava segments... despite that being faster than Olympic track cyclists

The correction and amendment has been made online and comes after the newspaper published this on its front page last week...

Telegraph front page

The online version of the story is now titled: "How cyclists are turning UK roads into death traps". 

In a correction at the bottom of the article the newspaper admitted publishing "erroneous" data and claimed Strava data "cannot be checked or independently verified". Adding to the bizarre tale of one of the nation's biggest media organisations getting something so simple so spectacularly wrong, over the weekend it emerged that one of the journalists working on the story was a former BBC fact checker. No, really...

The Telegraph's correction states: "This article and its headline have been amended to remove speeds recorded on Strava which Strava has now deleted and which appear to have been erroneous. Data is uploaded to Strava by users, either automatically or manually, and cannot be checked or independently verified; the data is accepted on trust.  We are happy to clarify this point and correct the record."

The newspaper was ridiculed and heavily criticised for the piece, and there will be concerns the correction comes too late for the thousands of people who will have already read the headline online and in print.

Active Travel Commissioner Chris Boardman described the article as "hate speech" and said certain sections of the press' demonisation of cyclists as killers has "just got to stop".

"Mums, dads, sons and daughters being labelled as killers. It's just got to stop," he said. "I don't normally get involved in calling out headlines but it's just getting bonkers. If this was directed at a gender, race or religion it would be rightly called out as the hate speech it is."

The Sky Sports News presenter Sanny Rudravajhala also expressed his anger at the article's inaccuracies, addressing the authors on X/Twitter: "Your whole piece centres on injuries and deaths from cyclists without anything to compare it with. Four deaths caused by cyclists for example versus say the 1,711 from cars in 2022?

"Or 143,326 injuries from car accidents versus the 462 from cyclists that you mention. And bloody hell, this quote, 'Strava enthusiasts claim dangerous cyclists are a small minority'. - I mean, clearly they are? Or are the majority of Strava cyclists dangerous?

"I just cannot imagine compromising my entire journalistic training to the point of providing no balance whatsoever bar one random rider vox in an entire piece. Please do better."

The glut of media coverage around "dangerous cycling" was sparked by a recent coroner's inquest into the tragic case of 81-year-old Hilda Griffiths, killed in a collision with a cyclist in Regent's Park back in 2022, with the inquest being told that the cyclist would face no charges. 

Last weekend, the Telegraph reported that another pedestrian was hit by a cyclist at the same spot where Ms Griffiths was fatally struck. Strava responded by urging cyclists to "prioritise everyone's safety", stating that "hazardous" segments could be flagged on its platform. 

In response, the government agreed to introduce tougher laws for "dangerous cyclists" who kill or injure. The amendment to the Criminal Justice Bill, put forward by Sir Iain Duncan Smith MP, would introduce the offence of 'causing death by dangerous, careless or inconsiderate cycling, and causing serious injury by careless or inconsiderate cycling', with Transport Secretary Mark Harper saying the proposed legislation would ensure the "tiny minority" of reckless cyclists would face the "full weight of the law", while protecting "law-abiding cyclists".

22 May 2024, 16:03
So... anyone doing anything on July 4th?

It's nice of Rishi to schedule the election for the day of a flat (and likely very boring) first-week Tour de France sprint stage. July the fourth... wouldn't want to overshadow any of those punchy days or early mountains...

Rishi Sunak (OpenArt AI)

 

22 May 2024, 15:49
Alright smart-arse! Now you can turn your butt into a fitness tracker
22 May 2024, 15:16
Georg Steinhauser wins stage 17 of the Giro d'Italia

EF Pro Cycling and Georg Steinhauser finally have their stage win, for the German it's also his first pro win — not a bad day to do it on...

The result was in the bag from quite far out on the final climb, not that it will have felt that way for the 22-year-old grinding his way up the vicious (if immaculately surfaced) slopes of Passo Brocon. In the end his advantage was cut to 1:24 by the finish line, a late surge by Tadej Pogačar meaning the maglia rosa took even more time on his rivals. 

Behind Pogačar, there was once again little between the rest, Ben O'Connor suffering a bad day and losing time, but Antonio Tiberi, Geraint Thomas, Dani Martinez, Einer Rubio and Romain Bardet all finishing 1:42 down on Steinhauser.

22 May 2024, 14:41
Comment(s) of the day... I'm glad we're not the only ones who enjoy Soudal Quick-Step's sponsor shout-outs
Live blog comments 22 May 2024

It's a full on job when you work for a team whose website lists 48 sponsors and partners...

22 May 2024, 13:24
Giro d'Italia stage 17: Another tough day in the mountains

Picture the scene. You're two weeks into a Grand Tour. Knackered. You limp through a freezing day in the mountains, get back to the bus, open up the roadbook and are confronted with this for the next stage...

Giro d'Italia stage 17 (RCS)

An earlier break containing Julian Alaphilippe, Nairo Quintana, Damiano Caruso and a few others has since returned to the peloton, meaning it's almost entirely back together as the riders approach 50km to go. Lidl-Trek's Amanuel Ghebreigzabhier chased some mountain points at the top of the last climb and has found himself alone at the front with 30 seconds' advantage. Apart from that, there's just the main bunch of favourites (well, THE favourite and the rest) and those well off the back.

Is it going to be stage win number six for Pog?

22 May 2024, 13:06
Former cycling film actor accused of motor doping at French stage race dramatically flees and knocks down race director with his van
22 May 2024, 09:46
"If that does not invoke the extreme weather protocol, then what does?": Adam Hansen comments on stage 16 chaos

CPA riders' union President Adam Hansen has tried to explain the events that led to yesterday's stage being shortened and questioned the organisers' "let's see how it goes approach" in the face of freezing conditions that "would have resulted in riders on the side of the road, scattered all over the climb, looking for shelter in the snow".

Giro d'Italia 2024 (SWpix.com/Zac Williams)

"On the rest day, the CPA first contacted all stakeholders to arrange an agreement based on the weather forecast for stage 16," he said. "It was clear that the conditions on Umbrail Pass should invoke the UCI extreme weather protocol, and the riders proposed eliminating this pass to avoid two degrees with snow during the long descent.

"The riders' intention was to have a full race without having to stop and restart due to extreme weather. The riders stood united in their decision, which was communicated to show the seriousness of their stance. After many hours of negotiations on the morning of the race, the CPA did their best to convey the riders' seriousness in avoiding today's situation.

"In the end, it was clear that Umbrail Pass could not have been raced as local authorities closed the pass due to too much snow. If the riders had raced, as the stakeholders wanted, the race would have stopped at the Umbrail Pass. Please remember, the riders' intention was always to race from point A to B and put on a show, exactly like they did and how a race should be.

Larry Warbasse Giro d'Italia 2024 (SWpix.com/Zac Williams)

"So ultimately, due to the weather, the original race course could not have been completed. Especially since before the race had even started, it was zero degrees with snow. If that does not invoke the extreme weather protocol, then what does?

"It is 2024; we need to have a clear protocol in place for all stakeholders to understand and accept to preserve the good image of cycling. A 'let's see how it goes' approach, especially today, would have resulted in riders on the side of the road, scattered all over the climb, looking for shelter in the snow. This is not the solution for ensuring the riders' health."

22 May 2024, 09:37
The good people of Facebook sum up Pat's hat spat

Lefevere or the UCI: pick your fighter... no, you can't say neither...

Julian Alaphilippe 2024 Giro d'Italia (Zac Williams/SWpix.com)

The two comments we've got over on Facebook sum up the way this sort of thing divides opinion...

Steve Soper: "Stupid doesn't really cover most of these so called officials."

Paul Wilson: "Imagine the guys who are in charge of the rules applying the rules. The horror. You can't have it both ways, if the weather is increasing the danger then all the more reason to enforce the safety rules."

We'll spare you the poll...

22 May 2024, 09:29
Coastguard rescues child who fell 20 metres "down a steep bank" while cycling along cliff path
Falmouth Coastguard Rescue Team (Facebook)

Falmouth Coastguard Rescue Team said it was called to a cliff path between Maenporth and Swanpool on Monday evening to a report that a child had fallen around 20 metres down a steep bank while cycling along the route.

"Team members carried out an assessment of the casualty's injuries, suspecting a potentially serious leg injury and began treating him. Paramedics then arrived on scene and administered some pain relief to enable a comfortable move to our stretcher," the coastguard team confirmed.

"The casualty was then moved up the bank using some of our rope rescue equipment. He was then carried out along the footpath to a waiting ambulance for onward transport to hospital. The casualty was incredibly brave throughout his ordeal and we wish him a speedy recovery."

22 May 2024, 09:14
How long does it take to save up for an S-Works SL8 around the world?

CyclistsHub.com has shared an interesting article detailing how long it takes to afford a top-of-the-range SL8 around the world...

How long to save up for an S-Works SL8? (CyclistsHub.com/Petr Minarik)

Check out the full piece and all the stats here...

22 May 2024, 08:58
Richmond Park Strava segment flagged as hazardous
Richmond Park Strava segment hazardous

The main segment in south-west London's Richmond Park, a popular destination for cyclists in the English capital, has been flagged as hazardous after a week where Strava was thrust into the spotlight by much coverage around "dangerous cycling" in the national press.

The Royal Parks, the charity which also manages Richmond Park, asked Strava to remove a popular segment in Regent's Park due to a pedestrian being killed in a collision with a cyclist in two years ago.

In response, Strava told road.cc that it was urging cyclists to "prioritise everyone's safety" and "behaviours related to" the death of a pensioner — hit by a cyclist at speeds of 25-29mph as a group ride completed laps of Regent's Park — "violate" its community standards. The ride-sharing app also made it clear the feature to flag a segment as hazardous already exists.

On Friday, we reported that Telegraph journalists had been told to "check your research" after the paper put a story on its front page claiming that cyclists are hitting 52mph in pursuit of London Strava segments... despite that being faster than Olympic track cyclists, with Richmond Park named as one segment where cyclists were "creating death traps".

Telegraph front page/ cyclists in Richmond Park (Simon MacMichael/Telegraph)

The story led Active Travel Commissioner Chris Boardman to criticise the media's portrayal of cyclists. "Mums, dads, sons and daughters being labelled as killers. It’s just got to stop," he said.

22 May 2024, 08:39
What's the fastest way to commute by bike on a budget? The sub-£500 DIY e-bike vs acoustic bike challenge
22 May 2024, 07:51
Giro d'Italia helmet row as Patrick Lefevere questions jury after Julian Alaphilippe fined for removing helmet to "take off his wet cap" in the cold
Julian Alaphilippe 2024 Giro d'Italia (Zac Williams/SWpix.com)

A grim day at the Giro yesterday as the riders tackled a shortened, but still freezing cold and sodden, day of riding through the mountains. Julian Alaphilippe was again one of the protagonists, up the road chasing stage victory before Tadej Pogačar's latest display of inevitable superiority.

Everyone will have a story from stage 16, few who completed it will forget it quickly, but one reaction angle coming post-stage was regarding the jury's attitude to Alaphilippe briefly removing his helmet mid-stage to remove his wet hat beneath. Patrick Lefevere took to Twitter (a quintet of words that'll strike fear into anyone, I know, but don't worry, nothing contemptible today) to point out his rider was fined 200 Swiss francs (£172) for the pleasure.

"That's how they treat a rider who wants to take off his wet cap under his helmet," he wrote.

You can certainly understand Lefevere's frustration (a sentence I never thought I'd write), given the extreme weather conditions perhaps the jury could have cut Alaphilippe some slack in not wanting a soaking hat on his head? I'm sure they'd argue it is just their job to enforce the rules as they are written.

The replies suggest the cycling-watching public are split on it:

"The UCI wants a big Christmas Party this year!! Often wondered if fines are their party fund?"

"The correct way to do it is to stop, take of his helmet and wet cap, put helmet back on and set off again."

"When he falls on the wet road and suffers a serious head injury, everyone screams that he should have obeyed the rules. Or would he have done everything right even in this case? The penalty is justified if he doesn't stop, there are already enough serious injuries this season!"

"UCI are clowns sadly"

I'm glad we've cleared that one up then. Alaphilippe was also the subject of post-stage comments from fellow breakaway rider Ewen Costiou of Arkéa - B&B Hotels who finished ninth, the young Frenchman thanking his compatriot for taking "a big turn just for me while he was dead". The TV pictures showed the peloton nearing as the two-time champion got on the front of the breakaway, pushing the pace and emptying the tank to earn them some welcome seconds before he subsequently dropped out the back of the telly completely empty.

"He's a huge champion, it's great to have done that, he didn't have to," Costiou said.

And finally, we can't let this opportunity pass without another look at the Frenchman's amusing quotes published on his team's website. I say 'amusing' because Soudal-QuickStep are the masters of seamless sponsor shout-outs. This is the team, after all, who (in 2022 during Alaphilippe's recovery from a crash at Liège-Bastogne-Liège) reported their rider was now strong enough to "resume light training on a set of Tacx rollers".

It gave us a laugh imagining the team's doctor earnestly concluding: 'I'm sorry, Julian. Your body is not strong enough for Elite or Wahoo just yet. For people with your injuries, I always prescribe Tacx...'

Welcome to today's shoehorned sponsor shout-out...

"It was a crazy day," Alaphilppe said. "With the route change because of the weather, and the full gas tempo from the start all the way to the finish. The weather didn't make it easy, but Specialized's rain tyres have lots of grip in these conditions. I rode on my instinct and I can be happy with the way I gave my best.

"It was cold today, but I had my Castelli clothing to keep me warm and dry, which helped me stay in the lead so deep into the stage."

Fair play, superb name-dropping, plus the sponsors pay the bills to keep the team running... and we enjoy reading it and putting it on the blog. Long may it continue...

Dan is the road.cc news editor and has spent the past four years writing stories and features, as well as (hopefully) keeping you entertained on the live blog. Having previously written about nearly every other sport under the sun for the Express, and the weird and wonderful world of non-league football for the Non-League Paper, Dan joined road.cc in 2020. Come the weekend you'll find him labouring up a hill, probably with a mouth full of jelly babies, or making a bonk-induced trip to a south of England petrol station... in search of more jelly babies.

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81 comments

Avatar
eburtthebike | 4 weeks ago
7 likes

Telegraph "We are happy to clarify this point and correct the record."

No, they aren't.  They're happy to publish a correction that almost nobody who read the original pile of excrement will read, and most people who read it will still believe it.

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Patrick9-32 replied to eburtthebike | 4 weeks ago
2 likes

Exactly this, Corrections should have to be published on the same page and in the same size font as the falsehoods they are fixing. You put something wrong on the front page you are gonna look really stupid publishing a paper where the headline is "We were wrong, we are sorry, cyclists can't go 52 miles per hour and to think that was reasonable shows how gullible and lacking in basic analytical skills our journalists really are. Can you trust us on anything else?"

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kingleo | 4 weeks ago
2 likes

A few years ago the park was left open overnight for a while because of a huge sinkhole in Petersham - Motorists killed nearly 200 deers in a year, I was talking to a motorist about it in a youth hostel, I was told 'it's alright for motorists to kill the dear in Richmond Park because they have to be culled.

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AidanR | 4 weeks ago
12 likes

IPSO received 90 complaints about the Telegraph article and are investigating. I'm guessing that the retraction is to head this off.

What I would love to see, though, is corrections have as prominent a place as the original article, i.e. splashed across the top of the front page. A guy can dream...

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fincon1 | 4 weeks ago
8 likes

The Daily Telegraph is now as bad as the Mail. I cancelled my subscription earlier this year after yet another anti-cycling article. Chris Boardman is right.

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IanMSpencer | 4 weeks ago
11 likes

The Telegraph retraction is itself misleading.

Suspicious rides can be reported and unlikely stats are grounds for removal. Apparently, instead of hand wringing about how nothing can be done, the Telegraph have seen the process in action and not understood it.

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Steve K | 4 weeks ago
5 likes

Well, after all that, if rumours are true that the election is about to be called, then there's a high chance that the relevant Bill falls and we don't get the dangerous cycling law (yet, at least).

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essexian replied to Steve K | 4 weeks ago
4 likes

4th July...just called by a Tory Wet.

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Mr Hoopdriver replied to Steve K | 4 weeks ago
1 like

If he calls for the dissolution of Parliament on the 30th May, there are still five working days for it to be rushed through.  Seeing as it seemed to get added and OK'd to be added in about five days, don't hold your breath.

It could go through quickly as a last gasp effort and be approved just because there's no point in stretching things out due to an election.

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Tom_77 replied to Mr Hoopdriver | 4 weeks ago
1 like

Mr Hoopdriver wrote:

If he calls for the dissolution of Parliament on the 30th May, there are still five working days for it to be rushed through.  Seeing as it seemed to get added and OK'd to be added in about five days, don't hold your breath.

It could go through quickly as a last gasp effort and be approved just because there's no point in stretching things out due to an election.

According to The Guardian Parliament will be prorogued on Friday 24th May:

Quote:

The timings allow just two days for “wash-up”, when the government finalises non-contentious bits of legislation, suggesting that Sunak’s controversial plans to ban smoking and his flagship renters and leaseholders bills are likely to be dropped.

Avatar
Mr Hoopdriver replied to Tom_77 | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

I was using 30th May because it's on BBC's site :-

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-62064552

Guardian also says parliament ends on 30th May too :-

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/article/2024/may/22/why-is-rishi-sunak-calling-a-general-election-now-and-what-happens-next

I'd be less pessimistic if it was 24th May  1 

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Mr Hoopdriver replied to Mr Hoopdriver | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

30th May is dissolution of Parliament, 24th is prorogue date after which 'normal activites' diminish so there is room for exceptional stuff to happen.  It depends on whether the government considers the crime bill exceptional.  It is contentious, not only because of the cycling (from my point of view) but also because of other stuff like immigration and the clamping down on protests.

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mattw replied to Mr Hoopdriver | 4 weeks ago
2 likes

Mr Hoopdriver wrote:

30th May is dissolution of Parliament, 24th is prorogue date after which 'normal activites' diminish so there is room for exceptional stuff to happen.  It depends on whether the government considers the crime bill exceptional.  It is contentious, not only because of the cycling (from my point of view) but also because of other stuff like immigration and the clamping down on protests.

Good points.

There was Lab Con support for the anti-cycling stuff.

On immgration and Rwanda (?) it is around Lab not wanting it, but also around any benefit Sunk may get from an easy campaigning hit on Labour. They could let it through then replace it with their package after the Election, assuming a win and whatever is in their manifesto.

Rotherham is interesting, as I'd expect Gallowazzock to run a sectarian campaign.

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momove replied to Tom_77 | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

Thanks for the wash up info, I was wondering exactly this. I was vaguely aware of the wash up process but not exactly certain of what it meant.

So if this legislation is considered contentious (what does this mean - whether the main opposition party would oppose it?), it wouldn't get passed through the wash up process?

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Tom_77 replied to momove | 4 weeks ago
3 likes

This is the progress of the Criminal Justice Bill. Can't see it passing in the 2 days remaining, unless it's cut down to just a few sections.

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momove replied to Tom_77 | 4 weeks ago
1 like

Thanks for the info - helpful.

Guess we'll see what happens between now and the end of the month in any case.

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eburtthebike replied to Tom_77 | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

.

 

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eburtthebike replied to Tom_77 | 4 weeks ago
2 likes

Tom_77 wrote:

According to The Guardian Parliament will be prorogued on Friday 24th May:

Legally?  Not like Boris?

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Steve K replied to Mr Hoopdriver | 4 weeks ago
1 like

Mr Hoopdriver wrote:

If he calls for the dissolution of Parliament on the 30th May, there are still five working days for it to be rushed through.  Seeing as it seemed to get added and OK'd to be added in about five days, don't hold your breath.

It could go through quickly as a last gasp effort and be approved just because there's no point in stretching things out due to an election.

Parliament wasn't sitting next week anyway - Whitsun recess. And it's not just about rushing through that amendment, but the whole Bill. I don't actually know how controversial the rest of the Bill is, but not sure there's time anyway - but we shall see.

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stonojnr replied to Steve K | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

its already been through its 2nd reading, it will just get parked and picked up by the next government most likely via a carry over motion or simply as a new bill that looks alot like the old one. No party or individual MP has spoken out about the cycling parts, so its got enough broad consensus it would get passed whoever is in power.

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mattw replied to stonojnr | 4 weeks ago
4 likes

I think carry-over only works between sessions within a Parliament, not at a General Election.

Caveat: I am not a nerd to *that* extent.

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stonojnr replied to mattw | 4 weeks ago
1 like

the finance bill got carried over when May called her snap election, so theres precedent it can happen for bills that arent overtly party policy by the back door and have broadly achieved consensus already among MPs, its all part of the negotiations that will take place over the next few days.

regardless as I said even if they put the 6months worth of effort of this one in the bin, all a new government has to do is copy & paste the old one and off we go again.

this hasnt gone away.

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Steve K replied to mattw | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

mattw wrote:

I think carry-over only works between sessions within a Parliament, not at a General Election.

Caveat: I am not a nerd to *that* extent.

You are correct (I think).

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mattw replied to Steve K | 4 weeks ago
4 likes

I can't call the Policing wotsit wotsit wotsit Bill.

If it is only 3rd reading to go, it could get through in washup.

I'm not especially worried about the changes - it's mainly a displacement activity by self-deluded goons such as Iain Duncan-Smith. I'm still interested to see if it will require more equivalent standards to be applied to dangerous driving in all types of vehicle in practice.

I'm just glad that Rishi Sunk is overwhelmingly likely to be placed in his political grave earlier than I was expecting, and most of the more brain dead reactionaries with him.

IDS should be gone (Lab Target no 10), for example, and Teresa Villiers (Lab Target no 37) who was jumping up and down about "anti-car" LTNs in the astroturf debate this week. So there will be a significant clearing out of the dross.

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Mr Hoopdriver replied to mattw | 4 weeks ago
1 like

mattw wrote:

 So there will be a significant clearing out of the dross.

We can but hope.  I think my MP (Sir Simon Clark - Cons.) hasn't been too bad as far as they go and I'd be happy  to vote for him if he wore a different coloured tie but this time round, I'll be voting for whoever isn't Conservative and who has the greatest chance of kicking them into the dustbin of history.

My gut feeling is we're in for a hung parliament come July 5th.

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Global Nomad | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

" Working days needed to afford"  err..i'm sure that should be workign days to earn the equivalent sum. Unless affording a bike means you dont spend on anything else. I'll caveat this by admitting i haven't followed the link to check their protocol. 

my bike setup cost me the equivalent of about 2 of my net UK salary.....obviously saved over a much longer period

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andystow replied to Global Nomad | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

Global Nomad wrote:

my bike setup cost me the equivalent of about 2 of my net UK salary.....obviously saved over a much longer period

2 days? months? years? Months seems reasonable.

The most I've spent on a bike is a little more than half a month's worth of my pay, after taxes, health care, and retirement savings contribution.

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Mr Hoopdriver replied to andystow | 4 weeks ago
0 likes

Said the man earning $250k/annum  1

 

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andystow replied to Mr Hoopdriver | 4 weeks ago
1 like

Mr Hoopdriver wrote:

Said the man earning $250k/annum  1

Nope, I just don't spend a lot (relative to my income) on bikes. I've only ever bought two that weren't second hand, and I've never bought a carbon frame.

Avatar
brooksby | 4 weeks ago
9 likes

https://www.theguardian.com/world/article/2024/may/21/electric-cars-more...

gRauniad wrote:

Hybrid and electric cars are more likely to strike pedestrians than petrol or diesel vehicles, particularly in towns and cities, according to an analysis of British road traffic accidents.

Data from 32bn miles of battery-powered car travel and 3tn miles of petrol and diesel car trips showed that mile-for-mile electric and hybrid cars were twice as likely to hit pedestrians than fossil fuel-powered cars, and three times more likely to do so in urban areas.

Why eco-friendly cars are more hazardous is unclear, but researchers suspect a number of factors are to blame. Drivers of electric cars tend to be younger and less experienced, and the vehicles are much quieter than cars with combustion engines, making them harder to hear, especially in towns and cities.

"Drivers", surely?

 

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