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All your tubeless tyre choices

Want to go tubeless? Here are all your options in tyres.

Tubeless tyres are gradually gaining popularity as more riders become convinced that their improved ride and increased resistance to punctures are worth the cost of new wheels and tyres and the sometimes problematic fitting process. If you’re about to make the switch, here’s a look at your tyre options.

When tubeless tyres for road wheels first appeared you had very few choices. Hutchinson made tyres, Shimano and Stan’s NoTubes made wheels and conversion kits and, er, that was it. Now many tyre makers offer tubeless options, though Michelin and Continental are notable hold-outs.

Read more: How to fit a tubeless tyre
Read more: Road tubeless: everything you need to know — including how to convert

Bontrager

Bontrager R3.jpeg

Bontrager R3.jpeg

Bontrager R3

Bontrager offers a range of three tyres badged Tubeless Ready, which means what you need to get them working is sealant and either Bontrager’s special rim strips if you have Bontrager wheels, or other tubeless compatible wheels and valves. In ascending order of raciness, they’re the AW2, R2 and R3. We’ve tested and liked the latter as part of the Bontrager Road TLR Upgrade Kit.

Read our review of the Bontrager R3 Tubeless Ready
Read our review of the Bontrager Road TLR Upgrade Kit
Read our review of the Bontrager CX3 Team Issue TLR Cyclocross Tyres

Find a Bontrager dealer


Tyre Claimed weight Price
Bontrager R2 TLR 235g (25mm) £33.99
Bontrager R3 TLR 200g (25mm) £38.49
Bontrager CX0 TLR 395g (33mm) £44.99
Bontrager CX3 TLR 405g (33mm) £44.99

Hutchinson

Hutchinson Sector 28 tubeless tyre

Hutchinson Sector 28 tubeless tyre

Hutchinson Sector 28

Hutchinson launched tubeless tyres for road bikes back in 2006, so it’s no surprise the French tyre maker has a fairly big range. While most tyre makers have gone down the Tubeless Ready route with lightweight tyres that need sealant to keep the air in, Hutchinson also makes tyres to the original Road Tubeless spec, sealed with a coating of rubber inside the tyre.

Read our review of the Hutchinson Intensive Road Tubeless tyres
Read our review of the Hutchinson Fusion 2 tubeless tyres
Read our review of the Hutchinson Sector 28 tubeless tyres

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Hutchinson Fusion 5 Galactik Road Tubeless 240g (23mm) £48.98
Hutchinson Atom Road Tubeless 270g (23mm) £49.99
Hutchinson Fusion 3 Road Tubeless 300g (25mm) £45.47
Hutchinson Intensive 2 Road Tubeless 315g (25mm) £39.99
Hutchinson Sector 28 Tubeless Ready 295g (28mm) £49.99

 

IRC

IRC Pro Tubeless.jpg

IRC Pro Tubeless.jpg

IRC Formula Pro Tubeless

IRC makes several tubeless or tubeless ready tyres, but they’re very rare in the UK; we’ve only been able to find one source. That’s a pity as IRC has been pushing road tubeless technology to make tyres lighter and faster. The Pro Tubeless tyres have internal coating based on latex rubber rather than synthetic butyl. That makes for lower rolling resistance, just as a regular clincher tyre is faster with a latex inner tube than a butyl one.

Read our review of the Formula Pro Tubeless RBCC
Read our review of the Formula Pro Tubeless X-Guard

Tyre Claimed weight Price
IRC Formula Pro Tubeless Light 285g (25mm) £56.00
IRC Formula Pro Tubeless RBCC 310g (25mm) £50.00
IRC Roadlite Tubeless 340g (25mm) £40.00
IRC Formula Pro Fusion X-guard Tubeless 300g/340g (25mm/28mm) £50.00
IRC Formula X-Guard Tubeless 285g (23mm) £40.00

Mavic

Mavic Yksion Pro UST Clincher Tyre

Mavic Yksion Pro UST Clincher Tyre

Mavic Yksion Pro UST

Mavic jumped into the road tubeless sector with both boots in summer 2017, announcing a new standard — Road UST — and a big range of wheels. The accompanying tyre offerings are a bit thin at the moment — the Yksion Pro UST in 25mm and 28mm widths — but Mavic clearly anticipates other manufacturers adopting the standard when it's been ratified by the relevant international bodies.

Mavic still offers its all-purpose/gravel tyre in the old Road Tubeless standard, the 30mm Yksion Elite Allroad.

Find a Mavic dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Mavic Yksion Elite AllRoad 330g (30mm) £30.00
Yksion Pro UST NA £50.00

Panaracer

Panaracer Race A Evo 3 tubeless tyre.jpeg

Panaracer Race A Evo 3 tubeless tyre.jpeg

Panaracer Race A Evo 3 tubeless tyre

Panaracer has joined the tubeless fray with the Race A Evo 3 Tubeless. The Japanese tyre maker has developed a brand new bead which it claims allows the tyre to be inflated using just a hand pump and claims this tyre increases puncture resistance by 24% compared to the previous Evo 2 tyre, thanks to a new Protite puncture proof material. The tread compound is also claimed to improve cornering performance.

Read our review of the Panaracer Race A Evo 3 tubeless

Find a Panaracer dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Panaracer Race A Evo 3 280g (23mm) ~£32.50

Schwalbe

ProOne_Close_up

ProOne_Close_up

Schwalbe ProOne

Schwalbe says “The future will be tubeless” in its latest blurb for the Schwalbe Pro One tyre, which it claims is its best tubeless tyre ever. We tested the slightly less advanced One Tubeless recently and found it rode brilliantly and, unlike many tubeless tyres, it was easy to get on the rim and to then pop into place on the bead seat.

Schwalbe offers a total of six ‘Tubeless Easy’ tyres, from the Pro One, which is being reliably reported as having a super-low rolling resistance, to the aptly named Big One, a 60mm tyre intended for mountain bike beach racing but which we’ve included in case anyone’s thinking of building up a ‘monster-cross’ bike.

Read our review of the Schwalbe One Tubeless
Read our review of the Schwalbe Pro One Tubeless
Read our review of the Schwalbe S-One Tubeless

Find a Schwalbe dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Schwalbe Pro One 255g (25mm) £56.99
Schwalbe X-One Allround 370g (33mm) £34.99
Schwalbe G-One Allround 400g (35mm) £37.99
Schwalbe Big One 530g (60mm) £36.20
Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 595g (40mm) £44.95
Schwalbe Marathon Almotion 655g (40mm) £48.99

Specialized

Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless.jpg

Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless.jpg

Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless

Until recently, Specialized has focused on endurance and cyclo-cross riding with its Tubeless Ready tyres, which it spells 2Bliss because — well, who knows. Californians, eh?

Specialized also makes a Road Tubeless version of its S-Works Turbo tyre. The 26mm version of this tyre recently won a rolling resistance test against a range of standard and tubeless tyres, and looks promising as a fast tyre for UK riding.

Read our review of the Specialized Trigger Pro 2Bliss Ready

Find a Specialized dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Specialized Roubaix Road Tubeless 295g (25mm) £70.00
Specialized Terra Pro 2Bliss Ready 370g (33mm) £40.00
Specialized Tracer Pro 2Bliss Ready 365g (33mm) £40.00
Specialized Trigger Pro 2Bliss Ready 490g (38mm) £40.00
Specialized S-Works Turbo Road Tubeless 240g (24mm) £70.00
Specialized Sawtooth 2Bliss Ready 615g (42mm) £40

Vittoria

Vittoria Corsa Speed (Open TLR).jpg

Vittoria Corsa Speed (Open TLR).jpg

Vittoria makes the big claim that this graphene technology tyre is the fastest ever independently measured, and the lightest tubeless-ready tyre too.

Find a Vittoria dealer

Tyre Claimed weight Price
Corsa Speed (Open TLR) 205g (23mm) £41.99

[This article was last updated on September 1, 2017]

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

15 comments

Avatar
Zjtm231 [67 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes

I swallowed the marketing and put some Schwalbe ProOne tubeless on my faster commuter bike.

Tyres did feel lovely, grippy and were fast.

Sadly after only 50 miles the rear got a gash about half a cm. Wouldn't seal and had to chuck the tyre.

However the main problem is that you had to pump the tyre up almost everyday.
They would lose 10lbs pressure pretty much everyday (tyres were professionally installed on to brand new Hunt wheels not by me) and both tyres suffered pressure loss. My conclusion is tubeless is not for everyday use on road tyres.

On a race bike for specific races they'd be great but you'd still have to take a repair kit and spare inner tube for gashes which slightly screws the whole point of tubeless.

Anyone had any similar experiences?

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MonkeyPuzzle [28 posts] 3 weeks ago
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I'm running Schwalbe G-Ones on non-tubeless Fulcrum rims and they're great. Don't hold pressure as long as a tubed clincher but certainly not a faff. Some tyre/rim combos just don't work very well, so maybe you've been unlucky.

Avatar
roof30 [5 posts] 3 weeks ago
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Zjtm231 wrote:

I swallowed the marketing and put some Schwalbe ProOne tubeless on my faster commuter bike. Tyres did feel lovely, grippy and were fast. Sadly after only 50 miles the rear got a gash about half a cm. Wouldn't seal and had to chuck the tyre. However the main problem is that you had to pump the tyre up almost everyday. They would lose 10lbs pressure pretty much everyday (tyres were professionally installed on to brand new Hunt wheels not by me) and both tyres suffered pressure loss. My conclusion is tubeless is not for everyday use on road tyres. On a race bike for specific races they'd be great but you'd still have to take a repair kit and spare inner tube for gashes which slightly screws the whole point of tubeless. Anyone had any similar experiences?

Seriously?  I have Schwalbe Pro Ones on my Hunt 4 Seasons and am more than happy to pump them up every couple of days (it takes 20 seconds, literally) rather than have endless punctures.  Tubeless all the way from now on.

Avatar
paulrattew [207 posts] 3 weeks ago
1 like
roof30 wrote:
Zjtm231 wrote:

I swallowed the marketing and put some Schwalbe ProOne tubeless on my faster commuter bike. Tyres did feel lovely, grippy and were fast. Sadly after only 50 miles the rear got a gash about half a cm. Wouldn't seal and had to chuck the tyre. However the main problem is that you had to pump the tyre up almost everyday. They would lose 10lbs pressure pretty much everyday (tyres were professionally installed on to brand new Hunt wheels not by me) and both tyres suffered pressure loss. My conclusion is tubeless is not for everyday use on road tyres. On a race bike for specific races they'd be great but you'd still have to take a repair kit and spare inner tube for gashes which slightly screws the whole point of tubeless. Anyone had any similar experiences?

Seriously?  I have Schwalbe Pro Ones on my Hunt 4 Seasons and am more than happy to pump them up every couple of days (it takes 20 seconds, literally) rather than have endless punctures.  Tubeless all the way from now on.

 

I'm currently on over 10,000 miles of puncture free riding on schwalbe ones and pro ones. 

Yes I have to pump them up slightly more regularly than with tubes, but not that much. I certainly don't lose anywhere near 10psi per day. 

If they are losing that much pressure that quickly then you need to reinstall properly. Doesn't matter if they were 'professionally installed', they obviously didn't do a great job. Put new good quality tubeless rim tape on - make sure you follow the instructions fully (so with stans you need to use the right width and put two layers on, making sure there are no air bubbles). Make sure the rim bed is clean first. Use about 50% more sealant than recommended. There is no chance you will recognize the additional weight and it will just provide a bit more protection. 

As for gashes screwing the whole point of tubeless - you would have to put a new tube in a tubed tyre if this happened. You would probably have to bin the tyre as well if its cut through. So, no difference there. The fact that you won't pinch puncture, that the vast majority of other punctures will seal themselves is a massive benefit

Avatar
hawkinspeter [905 posts] 3 weeks ago
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Can't say that I've noticed Pro Ones losing pressure any quicker than standard butyl inner tubes.

However, I did bin one after getting a big gash in it but apart from that one incident, they've been good (although a bit slippery in the wet).

Avatar
logomomo [7 posts] 2 weeks ago
1 like
Zjtm231 wrote:

I swallowed the marketing and put some Schwalbe ProOne tubeless on my faster commuter bike. Tyres did feel lovely, grippy and were fast. Sadly after only 50 miles the rear got a gash about half a cm. Wouldn't seal and had to chuck the tyre. However the main problem is that you had to pump the tyre up almost everyday. They would lose 10lbs pressure pretty much everyday (tyres were professionally installed on to brand new Hunt wheels not by me) and both tyres suffered pressure loss. My conclusion is tubeless is not for everyday use on road tyres. On a race bike for specific races they'd be great but you'd still have to take a repair kit and spare inner tube for gashes which slightly screws the whole point of tubeless. Anyone had any similar experiences?

 

I run hutchison sectors on hunt 4 seasons and there was a slow drop in pressure to begin with. 

Hunt sent me some new rim tape as they'd fitted unsuitable tape at the factory which deffo reduced aire loss.

The biggest change came when i increased the amount of sealant though and now they drop 1-2 psi per week which quite frankly is fine. Also, make sure the valve is cleanly seated.

A proper cut in a tyre is a PITA whether you run tubeless or tubed.

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iso2000 [75 posts] 2 weeks ago
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What about the Schwalbe G-One Speed? Great Tyre.

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Miller [29 posts] 2 weeks ago
1 like

I'd add a +1 on paying attention  to whether the valve retention collar is screwed up tight, it does need to be but my experience is that they can easily come loose. As noted, if you're losing 10psi/day something is not quite right. A happy tubeless tyre will lose that in about a week. You don't need to pump them up every day but you do need to stay across tyre pressure.

But - Pro One on a commuter bike? That's a bit hopeful, I think. It's a race tyre, and while robust for a race tyre, I wouldn't commute on it. That G-One Speed, formerly S-One, would be a good choice.

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Dicklexic [70 posts] 2 weeks ago
1 like

I've been running Schwalbe Pro Ones and S-Ones tubeless for well over two years now and have been very very happy. I find the Pro One is perhaps a little fast wearing and cuts up a tad easily, but no more so than most other 'Race' tyres, and the added confidence and reliability of tubeless is well worth a little extra faff setting up, and having to do one or two more strokes of the track pump from time to time. Perhaps I've been lucky but I haven't had any catastrophic failures and have on several occasions 'suffered' a puncture that required no attention from me at the roadside whatsoever. In fact I have only been aware of them after the brief hissing sound of escaping air before the sealant has  done it's job. Only a couple of times has the sealant been a bit slow to seal and needed me to actually stop and top up the air, and even then I was able to carry on quite happily to a convenient place before doing so. A tubed tire would have deflated completely and needed me to stop immediately to repair/replace the tube. I do still always carry a spare tube and tyre boot though 'just in case', but that's just the old boy scout in me wanting to 'be prepared'!

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nniff [177 posts] 2 weeks ago
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My two pennnyworth:

Schwalbe pro-one on one of my bikes.  Good when they're working and a PITA when they're not.  THey have a nasty habit of looking liek they've sealed and then spray everything with a fine film of rubber.  They're still rideable, but bobbling along at 40 psi.  It ususally involve a benign-looking little hole that will not seal.  Answer is to put a patch on the inside, but some sealant seems to munch its way through rubber solution.

They're utterly shite in damp conditions - as in the rest of the group goes round a bend and you go skittering across the road instead as the front wheel starts to slide away.

They deform and get bulges on the wearing surface (front and back).  One's unfortunate.  Two's careless.  Three's taking the effing piss at £60 a pop.  I've got a new pair courtesy of a 2 for 1 sale.  It's their last chance, then it's back to tubes.

Running them at 80 psi to see if that helps now.

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hawkinspeter [905 posts] 2 weeks ago
1 like

@nniff  - you can get the Schwalbe Pro-Ones a lot cheaper:  £35 at Wiggle or you can get a pair with sealant and fitting liquid for £70: https://www.mantel.com/uk/schwalbe-pro-one-tubeless-set-doc-blue

 

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imajez [98 posts] 2 weeks ago
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I run Hutchinson Sector 28s on [wide] Pacenti SL25 rims at 40PSi, any higher and they are way too hard and bouncey. They get absolutely hammered both on and seriously off road. Riding on road can be pretty brutal at times too with the state of many UK roads. I would get pinch flats weekly if I had tubes going by how often I feel my rims on stones, edges etc.  The other massive benefit is that even when I had tyres badly sliced, the tyre deflates slowly enough that I can stop safely to then fix things. Had two big slashes on MTB tyres and  one on my 40c tyres with no bouncing along floor drama as a result. Found several large metal spikes in one tyre after some metal swarf on road sliced through my front MTB tyre. Which must have been there a while.

Possibly the best thing  to happen to bikes this century. You can run the correct pressure instead of pumping tyres too stupidly high in order to avoid pinch flats. Rolls better too.
 

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andyspaceman [253 posts] 2 weeks ago
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You need to add the Maxxis tubeless tyres in there. I've been running 25C Padrones on my road bike all year, and 40C Ramblers on my gravel bike. Both are good tyres, the Padrones are notably quick and grippy, if slighty on the narrow side.

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Stefan M [21 posts] 4 days ago
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Just tried using some Shoe Goo on an almost new Schwalbe Pro tyre that got a bad 5mm star shaped puncture.

Sealant had sealed the puncture fine and the Shoe Goo has filled in the hole in the rubber.

200 miles later and the Shoe Goo is still there and no further problems.

I made sure the hole was clean and dry and gave the Shoe Goo a couple of days to go off before riding.

For a larger puncture I would consider patching the inside as well.

Tubeless or not you can't do much if the inner casing is badly damaged but I've been riding tubeless on my bikes for years now, had several punctures but have never had to stop to fix them: sealant has just done the job as I've carried on cycling.

 

I also use about 50% more sealant (Stans) than recommended and change it  a couple of times a year. Tyres tend to lose 5-10psi per week but I check them before every ride anyway when I'm checking brakes/gears etc.

Tubeless for me everytime!

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bikedoofus [37 posts] 1 day ago
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Been riding schwalbe pro one tyres all of this year. They feel great in 28mm and grip great, plus I've had several punctures which have all self healed except one 5mm slice. Have had to replace the latter. Haven't noticed any particular gains in rolling friction etc, but neither do they feel heavier than my previous conti gp4000s.
You do have to pump them up before each ride as they lose 10psi overnight but then I always check my tyres before each ride anyway.