How not to be a knob to female cyclists

Top tips on how not to discourage even more women off the road and out of the sport

by Sarah Barth   January 19, 2014  

Female cyclist giving thumbs up (uploaded to Flickr under CC-BY-SA licence by Chris Hunkeler)

This week a BT Sport survey found that 80 per cent of women athletes polled felt pressure to conform to a certain look and body type.

Hold that thought for a second - the vast majority of athletes, women at the top of their game physically, are facing pressure from the media, social media, coaches, sports officials and other athletes to look a certain way - as Rebecca Adlington put it on that jungle programme through a curtain of tears: ‘stick thin, big boobs and a pretty face.’

76 of the athletes said their behaviour had been influenced - so they might change their diet (87 per cent), or their training (58 per cent). One athlete said she developed an eating disorder, while another said: “Sometimes it has meant my diet no longer is optimum for performance but becomes optimum for looking slimmer/thinner....which isn't my body type.”

Perhaps some of the pressure comes from the way women athletes are constantly being pursued to pose naked - although perhaps the highest profile British woman pro cyclist, Victoria Pendleton, didn’t seem too concerned about going nude in GQ magazine before the Olympics.

“I don’t suppose it does bother me really,” she said. “I have done a few sexy photoshoots, I’ve been told I’ve got a nice bum, plus when I compete I am wearing a skin suit, so really, what’s the difference?”

Having said that, she’s also said that she was ‘saddened’ to have her muscles airbrushed out of media images, to make her look ‘more feminine’, and told BT Sport this week: “I think that it would be really valuable if women were celebrated for their achievements more.”

It’s easy to think these superstars should get over it - stop looking at the abuse on Twitter, ignore the insecurity and think of the pound signs - but there’s a more insidious side to all of this.

Women already battle a number of reasons not to get on a bike every day. From bike shop assistants who don’t understand women’s cycling needs or patronise them, to employers who don’t provide showers or decent changing facilities, to clubs that don’t know how to cater to women, to traffic fears when cycling with children - the list of reasons not to get onto a saddle can seem endless.

The Australian Heart Foundation’s report into women and cycling last year found the need to transport children and cycling clothes being unfashionable were the reasons a third of women gave for men cycling more than them.

Whether or not you think these are valid excuses to choose a car over a bike, it’s hard to argue it’s a good thing these women aren’t cycling.

So let’s not give women any more reasons to leave the bike at home.

 

Here’s how not to be a dick to a female cyclist in six simple steps*

 

1. Do not fetishise her

Women on bikes don’t want your pervy comments any more than they want your rude ones. Victoria Pendleton probably gets a tiny bit of sick in her mouth every time some guy tells her how much he likes to look at her in cycling shorts.

Many women already feel self-conscious putting it all on show, so make like you haven’t noticed it, okay?

If you have some creepy thing about tight Lycra, keep it to yourself, or look online for some like-minded weirdos to share it with instead.

2. Do not harass her

I know you might not be one of them, but those guys exist. The ones who shout things out of car windows, or worse, film your arse as you ride along (yep, it happens). Don’t do it - it’s probably illegal and it’s never ended well for any guy who’s tried it with me.

3. Don’t put mean comments under reviews of women’s clothing

When we review women’s clothing at road.cc, we do it so women know whether a bit of gear is worth forking out for. When we photograph a woman wearing it, we do it so she gets a vague idea of whether she likes the look of it.

What we don’t do is photograph it so you get to leer all over that woman in tight clothing, comment on whether or not she is ‘really’ a cyclist or suggest some super-helpful diet or exercise tips for her to look more like a ‘real’ cyclist.

Besides being unpleasant for the woman in the picture, take a second to think about how an 'ordianary' woman thinking about taking up riding is going to feel about the reception she might get.

4. Don’t put mean comments under reviews of men’s clothing, either

One of our male reviewers often gets mocked for being too skinny, and some bloke last week decided to point out that he doesn’t have 'proper cyclists legs' - which was quite funny as he's just got a semi-pro contract with a Belgian team for the season.

Just don’t body snark - it just makes you look like a dick.

5. Do speak out

If you see a woman (or a man) getting abused for any reason, do speak out. Tell that person their Tweet wasn’t cool. Call out the pervy guy on the club run. The person on the receiving end will be grateful and if 0.00001% of knobs change their attitude because of what you said, that’s still progress.

6. Don’t give unsolicited ‘advice’

The girls you know who cycle might really want your advice on what protein shakes to have for breakfast, or how sprint intervals will make them leaner, or whatever. If they want it, they’ll ask.

If they don’t, they’ll just carry on riding whatever bike they chose, wearing whatever they picked out for the purpose, eating whatever tastes good. But thanks for your concern.

 

*There are probably loads more ways not to be a knob to women on bikes. Feel free to add your own in the comments below.

104 user comments

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posted by don simon [116 posts]
21st January 2014 - 22:11

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Addressing #6... if you don't know you don't know and somebody comes up and enlightens you, then you know and now know you didn't know and what you know now might be handy.
Depends how it's done, is all.

posted by Cauld Lubter [117 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 0:00

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excellent points made, certainly gives food for thought...well said.
MB

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posted by flexcamp [19 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 1:58

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I reject no'6 because

a) people have dangerous cycling habits like cycling in the door zone, not shoulder-checking etc, and you could save their life by pointing this out.
b) so many cyclists cycle with their seat too low.

posted by kie7077 [419 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 2:16

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I do find this article a bit strange, in a way... Yes, when I overtake some men, they do overtake me back, but I find it funny & its usually the same type of person. The type of person who would be the same in any walk of life, on a bike or not.
[[[[[[ Look on the bright side. These blokes who "re-overtake" you---at least they're not sitting an inch off your rear wheel, staring at your...er...rear.
P.R.

PhilRuss

posted by PhilRuss [267 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 3:32

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It may just be my thick skin, but I can't recall having being personally treated negatively because I'm female.
I may have once or twice in two years had something shouted at me out of a vehicle window, but everyone gets nutters like that now and again.
Shops, fine.
Club runs, if I get dropped, that's due to a lack of fitness, not my sex. If anything, blokes seem to welcome having a woman along a lot of the time. Oh, apart from the lack of shelter I provide.
Last week on another forum, I pulled up a couple of blokes for taking the piss out of a photo of a rather large woman in bib tights, but a woman had also commented negatively, and they probably would've said similar had it been a man.

posted by dottigirl [9 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 4:13

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I often catch up with cyclists with screeching chains and have been on the verge of offering chain oil a number of times. I thought I'd say, your chain is dry, it is wearing fast and pedalling is harder, here is some oil. Never mustered the courage. I am glad to find out it would have been a mistake.

posted by StefanT [3 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 10:59

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Meanwhile, try searching twitter for the hashtag #sportswomen - some of the questions posted for a Q&A with gymnast Beth Tweddle will make your toes curl, and reminds me that ultimately, while some may disagree on the points above, we are all actually trying to be civilised human beings.

If I could have, say, 6 bikes, would it stop me drooling over others that I don't have?

posted by notfastenough [2879 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 12:09

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notfastenough wrote:
Meanwhile, try searching twitter for the hashtag #sportswomen - some of the questions posted for a Q&A with gymnast Beth Tweddle will make your toes curl, and reminds me that ultimately, while some may disagree on the points above, we are all actually trying to be civilised human beings.

God some of that was horrendous. We were having a big twitter debate on it yesterday.

I think there's a very fine line between banter between mates (we all have a dig now and again) - out and out bullying and sexually harrassing a SPORTSperson, not even a celebrity for the sake of celebrity, like that is horrendous.

Someone in work today said "well is that not just freedom of speech?" - to which my answer was simply that these people would not say these things to these people in real life, these are men and women who in reality could be quite nice and normal, yet when presented with the shroud of the internet feel it necessary to objectify other human beings to the point that they can instill such bitter hatred towards them to the point of causing real distress and damage.

And it's not necessarily the point that women are the only subject of this sort of harassment, but the behavior directed towards women does seem to have some trend of deeper, more personal angling. I think the point is that while women are simply humans too and we should all just take it with a pinch of salt, we're built differently to men and our brains work in different ways. While we'd like to be as thick skinned as our male counterparts that sometimes just isn't possible, we can read deeply and sensitively into what could be meant as passing jest and it can really, really affect us.

This isn't meant to be a teeny tiny violin moment either. Say what you [not directed at anyone here] like behind peoples backs, that's your own prerogative but please take a moment to think about what you're about to say in public, and realise that there are always consequences to all actions.

I think the point on the knickers under shorts thing is that to a lady that is a VERY personal thing, while blokes are alright to lob it out for a waz at the side of the road, most women are incredibly sensitive to anything to do with the body and the idea that someone has actually spent time to look at their bottom to be able to make such a comment can come across in very much the wrong way. The idea of being looked at like that can make some girls feel immensely self conscious.

Banter/moral value - there IS a difference.

I'm not one for giving a toss but shits getting a bit much these days.

Merlin Cycles women's race team ~ http://www.merlincycles.com
Manx nerd peddler ~ http://mooleur.blogspot.com

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posted by mooleur [532 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 13:25

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I had a look at the Twitter posts about Beth Tweddle - it's enough to put any woman off competing in sport.

If cycling is indeed a sport of self-abuse why aren't more cyclists sectioned under the mental health act?

posted by hairyairey [275 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 15:32

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Warriors behind keyboards, that's the thing. I'd say that I'd like to be in the room when they say it, but I reckon if they were confronted with an angry-looking (but let's be fair, not big & tough) Beth Tweddle, their insults would likely disappear up their own ar$es. It's no different to road-rage - people say stuff from inside a tin box that they wouldn't dare say up-close.

If I could have, say, 6 bikes, would it stop me drooling over others that I don't have?

posted by notfastenough [2879 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 17:27

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hairyairey wrote:
Hang on a second - is this meant to be an article telling men how to treat women on bicycles? Seems like people are treating as such even though it isn't said. If so, can we have an article about how women should treat men on bicycles? Let's start with not being unfriendly...

Here in the USA, I'll often wave Hello to other cyclists going the opposite way. If it is a woman riding solo, a large majority won't reciprocate and wave back, yet it changes to 50/50 possibility if they are riding with a man.

Shut up legs, you don't get a vote.

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posted by ridein [47 posts]
22nd January 2014 - 17:33

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fancynancy wrote:

I do find this article a bit strange, in a way that it seems to have highlighted an issue, that to me, is not there. Yes, when I overtake some men, they do overtake me back, but I find it funny & its usually the same type of person. The type of person who would be the same in any walk of life, on a bike or not. Plain Face


[[[[[ Well, fancynancy, would most women rather have these geezers (a) "re-overtaking" them---or (b) riding behind them for a mile? If I were female, and sensitive, I think I know which option I'd prefer. But as a chap, I also get "re-overtaken" by other chaps....and the older I get, the more I shrug...
P.R.

PhilRuss

posted by PhilRuss [267 posts]
23rd January 2014 - 1:57

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mooleur wrote:
I think the point on the knickers under shorts thing is that to a lady that is a VERY personal thing, while blokes are alright to lob it out for a waz at the side of the road, most women are incredibly sensitive to anything to do with the body and the idea that someone has actually spent time to look at their bottom to be able to make such a comment can come across in very much the wrong way. The idea of being looked at like that can make some girls feel immensely self conscious.

Banter/moral value - there IS a difference.

Sure, but there is also a difference between well meant advice that is just a bit too personal vs harassment. The problem I have with these kinds of articles is that usually no distinction is made between the two, even though they are obviously quite different (and people guilty of the one do not deserve the same response as people guilty of the other).

I also take issue with your rather sexist stereotyping of men as insensitive boors vs women as dainty little flowers. There are plenty of men who are sensitive and women with a very thick skin. Ultimately there is a (culturally determined) level of sensitivity that is too high, where a person can't expect the world to adapt to that over-sensitivity. IMO, getting upset that people look at your bum on the bike is oversensitive, because it's just what is right on front of you in a peloton. It's natural for (tired) cyclists to focus on part of the rider in front of them. That can be a wheel, the rear brake, the bum or the shirt. That is not automatically sexual in nature.

It's not a guy's fault when his behavior is completely misinterpreted.

posted by Aapje [158 posts]
23rd January 2014 - 16:29

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Aapje wrote:

Sure, but there is also a difference between well meant advice that is just a bit too personal vs harassment. The problem I have with these kinds of articles is that usually no distinction is made between the two, even though they are obviously quite different (and people guilty of the one do not deserve the same response as people guilty of the other).

I also take issue with your rather sexist stereotyping of men as insensitive boors vs women as dainty little flowers. There are plenty of men who are sensitive and women with a very thick skin. Ultimately there is a (culturally determined) level of sensitivity that is too high, where a person can't expect the world to adapt to that over-sensitivity. IMO, getting upset that people look at your bum on the bike is oversensitive, because it's just what is right on front of you in a peloton. It's natural for (tired) cyclists to focus on part of the rider in front of them. That can be a wheel, the rear brake, the bum or the shirt. That is not automatically sexual in nature.

It's not a guy's fault when his behavior is completely misinterpreted.

Whilst I agree that there should be some sort of distinction made in these articles between what is perceived as sexual harassment and innocent advice, my point is that an understanding and a level of empathy needs to be reached by all peers to adapt to accepting all genders into the peloton. Taking a step back before commenting on a girls underwear and processing the advice before giving it would be beneficial to all parties and stop this sort of misunderstanding from ever occurring. Your stance may be "well why should we have to" - we all make exceptions in life to accommodate for the different scenarios we encounter and accepting that males and females are different not just biologically but personally and intimately is not something that should be dismissed by equality. Put simply, yes - it sucks that these articles have to come to light, and yes we should all be able to just crack on and not be affected by these things but we all need to realise that is NOT the case and sometimes, unfortunately, this might mean eggshells - or just putting a bit of thought to a statement before giving it.

Could you please cite my alleged stereotyping of men? As I'd kept my statements fairly homogeneous in keeping with my standpoint on the subject.

As I've just said, we are ALL different - and to get along we need to interpret each and every personality, be it male or female, sensitive or not, in different ways.

Also as mentioned time and time again, I couldn't give a rats arse if the guy or girl behind me is looking at my arse as long as he doesn't clip my wheel and equally as long as he OR she doesn't comment on said arse afterward - which happens *too much* and this is what this article is pointing out. The fact is that there is unfortunate majority of males both within the peloton and outside of it (generally around social media) who feel it necessary to objectify sportswomen and in turn be outspoken on their misinformed and blatantly sexist opinions is damaging not just to those who are sensitive but to sport itself.

This is not a "sexist" opinionated biased view on the matter, this is fact, you only need to watch twitter for an hour to discover this.

Merlin Cycles women's race team ~ http://www.merlincycles.com
Manx nerd peddler ~ http://mooleur.blogspot.com

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posted by mooleur [532 posts]
23rd January 2014 - 17:05

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mooleur wrote:
Your stance may be "well why should we have to" - we all make exceptions in life to accommodate for the different scenarios we encounter and accepting that males and females are different not just biologically but personally and intimately is not something that should be dismissed by equality.

I do think the guy's advice was improper, primarily because it was not necessarily applicable to a woman. But I simply disagree with the notion that if a woman gets mentally scarred by a simple, non-sexual comment like this, she is perfectly normal, while the man is a horrible person.

The advice by the guy contains no judgement of the woman's body. It's not even a case of leering, given the realities of cycling. So then the only thing to be upset about is the entire notion that a man looks at a woman's body, which is unavoidable in the absence of burka's or the separation of sexes. So a woman with that much sensitivity is simply broken and should work on her own issues. She can't expect men to cater to that silliness.

We don't live in the Victorian era and it's simply part of reality that men look at women's bodies and women look at men. If you can only function by pretending that this isn't true and get mental issues when that bubble is burst, then the issue is yours. The world isn't going to adapt to the most prudish (and/or insane).

mooleur wrote:
Could you please cite my alleged stereotyping of men? As I'd kept my statements fairly homogeneous in keeping with my standpoint on the subject.

"we're built differently to men and our brains work in different ways. While we'd like to be as thick skinned as our male counterparts that sometimes just isn't possible, we can read deeply and sensitively into what could be meant as passing jest and it can really, really affect us."

This seems pretty clear stereotyping to me. You claim that men are not as sensitive, while women are. It's a classic stereotype and has been a key argument in the past when disallowing rights to women (because they 'can't handle X, due to their emotions'). Frankly, it's a monumentally dumb argument to make if you stand for equality.

mooleur wrote:
As I've just said, we are ALL different - and to get along we need to interpret each and every personality, be it male or female, sensitive or not, in different ways.

And now you make a completely different statement than the one I quoted. When you make conflicting statements, it is rather impossible for me to argue. So just let me state my position:

- There are comments that are clearly harassing, mean, etc. These are wrong and should be condemned.
- There are comments that are ill-advised, but made with good intent (or the intent is ambiguous). These should be treated with a gentle rebuke, assuming the best intent possible considering the comment. If someone overreacts to such a comment, that deserves a rebuke in itself.
- There are comments that are unwanted, but not wrong (in that context). An example is a come-on in a club by a person you are not attracted to. Handle it quickly and gently and move on.
- Men and women deserve the same respect. That goes both ways. No comments about women's bodies when inappropriate, but also no mean comments at men that they 'should take as a man.'

posted by Aapje [158 posts]
24th January 2014 - 9:48

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So, you're basically "arguing" the same point as me, whilst still attempting to somehow point out that my comments were in some way sexist against men when all I was attempting to point out is WHY the girl may have taken the comments in the wrong way and also point out the fact that men and women are in fact NOT equal.

You clearly want an argument, I do not.

My only debate is to clarify the reasoning behind articles such as this and to give a clearer view of how it is for female sportswomen at the moment, as it may not be obvious to people who want to understand better the reasoning behind these debates.

Merlin Cycles women's race team ~ http://www.merlincycles.com
Manx nerd peddler ~ http://mooleur.blogspot.com

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posted by mooleur [532 posts]
24th January 2014 - 12:35

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This reminds me of a lady in our team a few years back. She had a great attitude to the bike, was a great sprinter, but there was simply no way to avoid that she was significantly overweight.
Overweight in the terms of athletic performance and not 'phwarrr' appeal.
The said lady asked her male team mates what she could do to improve her performance and all she was told was to work on her Sprint and FTP.
Which was sound enough advice, but the reality is that losing the 15kg she was carrying would have taken her to national level.
Now, the question is.... Was it right for men to avoid the elephant in the room , or indeed was it sexist to avoid the subject? I remember toying over what was the right course of action for some time, before saying nothing.
The lady ultimately became frustrated by her lack of progression and sacked the racing off.

posted by Jimmy Ray Will [180 posts]
25th January 2014 - 0:24

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Jimmy Ray Will wrote:
This reminds me of a lady in our team a few years back. She had a great attitude to the bike, was a great sprinter, but there was simply no way to avoid that she was significantly overweight.
Overweight in the terms of athletic performance and not 'phwarrr' appeal.
The said lady asked her male team mates what she could do to improve her performance and all she was told was to work on her Sprint and FTP.
Which was sound enough advice, but the reality is that losing the 15kg she was carrying would have taken her to national level.
Now, the question is.... Was it right for men to avoid the elephant in the room , or indeed was it sexist to avoid the subject? I remember toying over what was the right course of action for some time, before saying nothing.
The lady ultimately became frustrated by her lack of progression and sacked the racing off.

That pretty much gets to the nub of the issue, from my perspective. I dont know the answer.

posted by edster99 [145 posts]
25th January 2014 - 20:36

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Jimmy Ray Will wrote:
This reminds me of a lady in our team a few years back. She had a great attitude to the bike, was a great sprinter, but there was simply no way to avoid that she was significantly overweight.
Overweight in the terms of athletic performance and not 'phwarrr' appeal.
The said lady asked her male team mates what she could do to improve her performance and all she was told was to work on her Sprint and FTP.
Which was sound enough advice, but the reality is that losing the 15kg she was carrying would have taken her to national level.
Now, the question is.... Was it right for men to avoid the elephant in the room

Yes, IMO. Yes, she asked for advice but there are still boundaries concerning how personal that advice should be.

a) She is not a close friend,

b) The advice would be potentially humiliating given in front of a group of people who are not close friends.

c) She probably isn't stupid and could work out for herself that losing excess fat would improve her athletic ability and efficiency.

So rather than state the obvious, I would have stuck to giving advice about technical details that she might be unaware of.

Quote:
, or indeed was it sexist to avoid the subject?

In my opinion, no. It would have been just as rude and patronising to tell an unknown lad that he would go faster if he lost 15kg, for the same three reasons above. You know he is fat. He knows he is fat and unless he is really stupid, he knows that he will go faster and have more stamina if he lost the excess weight.

If you were really determined to say something, maybe a general comment about how fitting lighter components to the bike could make a massive difference to performance? Then it is up to him/her if the penny drops and thinks about how personal weight loss might help too?

Never in a hurry on a bicycle.

posted by GoingRoundInCycles [134 posts]
25th January 2014 - 22:59

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Jimmy Ray Will wrote:
This reminds me of a lady in our team a few years back. She had a great attitude to the bike, was a great sprinter, but there was simply no way to avoid that she was significantly overweight.
Overweight in the terms of athletic performance and not 'phwarrr' appeal.
The said lady asked her male team mates what she could do to improve her performance and all she was told was to work on her Sprint and FTP.
Which was sound enough advice, but the reality is that losing the 15kg she was carrying would have taken her to national level.
Now, the question is.... Was it right for men to avoid the elephant in the room , or indeed was it sexist to avoid the subject? I remember toying over what was the right course of action for some time, before saying nothing.
The lady ultimately became frustrated by her lack of progression and sacked the racing off.

I've never met an overweight person who wasn't aware they were overweight. Male or female, you pointing out their fatness makes you a bit of a knob, I'm afraid.

If you're not sure you know someone well enough to discuss their weight with them, you don't know them well enough.

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posted by Sarah Barth [941 posts]
26th January 2014 - 10:20

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Quote:
Which was sound enough advice, but the reality is that losing the 15kg she was carrying would have taken her to national level.
Now, the question is.... Was it right for men to avoid the elephant in the room

Perhaps asking her what she felt was the correct direction to take.
Maybe talking about diet rather than weight directly would be more diplomatic.
Perhaps asking questions and listening to the answers in order to understand would have been beneficial.
As can be seen above, people get defensive and hurt when they don't like the advice on offer.

KalaBlinds 'cos we all need our beauty sleep.

posted by don simon [116 posts]
26th January 2014 - 11:40

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Also, without being a pretty top level coach I'm not sure you could have known for sure that losing 15kg would have 'taken her to national level'.

And your extreme level of fretting and concern about whether or not a woman who you clearly aren't actually that friendly with became a better cyclist is frankly baffling.

Sarah Barth's picture

posted by Sarah Barth [941 posts]
26th January 2014 - 12:06

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Wow Sarah - how do you manage to be so hostile to men? Do you have to work at it? Is there a training course to go on?

Here's an example of someone who had asked for advice on improving her performance so the question of losing extra weight was worth raising. Certainly in those circumstances I would have mentioned it and wouldn't have been scared to - doesn't mean I go round telling people they are fat.

If cycling is indeed a sport of self-abuse why aren't more cyclists sectioned under the mental health act?

posted by hairyairey [275 posts]
28th January 2014 - 20:13

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"I've never met an overweight person who wasn't aware they were overweight. Male or female, you
pointing out their fatness makes you a bit of a knob, I'm afraid. "

Making weight a taboo subject is such a bad idea, it only makes it harder for anyone to talk to people with weight issues - some of whom may want to talk about it, or it may very much be to their benefit to talk about it. It should not be taboo.

posted by kie7077 [419 posts]
29th January 2014 - 10:47

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Sarah Barth wrote:
Also, without being a pretty top level coach I'm not sure you could have known for sure that losing 15kg would have 'taken her to national level'.

And your extreme level of fretting and concern about whether or not a woman who you clearly aren't actually that friendly with became a better cyclist is frankly baffling.

Well...
1) if she was already knocking on the door of national level, it wouldn't be hard to work out.

2) If he's involved with her (in a cycling sense), is it surprising he might think about how he could assist her? I wouldn't characterise that as displaying 'an extreme level of fretting and concern'.

posted by edster99 [145 posts]
2nd February 2014 - 19:18

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Yeah like why don't all these cyclists writing tips for websites and magazines just shut the hell up? What's it got to do with any of you whether anyone enjoys or succeeds at cycling as much as possible? What are you, some sort of happy-clappy pinko altruists? Rolling On The Floor

Is it OK to opine on road.cc, but not in person? I can see how that might be good for road.cc, but not for society.

posted by a.jumper [679 posts]
4th February 2014 - 11:35

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"If you have some creepy thing about tight Lycra, keep it to yourself, or look online for some like-minded weirdos to share it with instead."

That's a bit harsh isn't it? Someone may well have a fetish for Lycra or whatever else they enjoy - does that entitle you to label them "creepy weirdo's"?

posted by Nick T [727 posts]
7th February 2014 - 23:04

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Important article, but I'm struggling a little bit with the sub-title 'Top tips on how not to discourage even more women off the road and out of the sport'
'not to discourage off' - is it just me, or is that is bit confusing?

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posted by dafyddp [139 posts]
18th March 2014 - 11:04

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The eyes see what the eyes see and the brain thinks what the brain thinks - it's whether you then vocalise what the brain is thinking that determines how you are perceived and how the subject (male or female) is made to feel.

Some people look great in Lycra, some people don't* it's not anyone's place to pass judgement on anothers body shape.

Cycling is about that - cycling, it's there for all to enjoy regardless of gender, ability or aesthetics.

*I don't.

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posted by chrisp1973 [57 posts]
29th April 2014 - 11:51

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