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Enigma launches updated Etape disc road bike with wider tyre clearance

Enigma updates Etape with wider tyre clearance and refined frame and new carbon fork

Last week Enigma, the British company that specialises in titanium and steel road bikes, shared a picture of its updated Etape, and I just had to find out more and share it with you all here.

The Etape is a long-running model in the company’s range. I remember testing one back in 2008 and it was a bike I was very impressed with. It's a really nice choice if you want a comfortable yet fast long distance bike for year-round, but especially winter training plus light touring and Audaxes.

Enigma 2105.jpg

To keep abreast of the changing tastes in the road cycling market, Enigma has updated the Etape. It’s now only available with disc brakes - the old Etape rim brake bike has been replaced by the new Evolve if you aren’t interested in disc brakes.

The new Etape, as well as being available only with disc brakes, has increased tyre clearance so it’ll now take up to 32mm tyres with mudguards fitted, and 35mm tyres if you strip away the ‘guards. That gives the new Etape extra scope to be hauled into use a light gravel bike if you fit a suitable tyre, of which there’s a growing choice now available.

Enigma 2106.jpg

The updated bike adopts the latest disc standards, so it’s 12mm thru-axles front and rear with flat mount calipers. Enigma has steered clear of internal cable routing in favour of running the cables and hoses along the underside of the downtube. The new all-carbon fork does have internal routing for the front brake hose, however, as well as dynamo routing which is a good addition to a bike like this. Pressfit haters rejoice, there’s a classic threaded bottom bracket down at the bottom of the frame.

Of course, there are full mudguard and rack mounts, and there are three bottle cage bosses too. The head tube is tapered and the 3AL/2.5V titanium tubeset is size-specific with each frame size tailored to the demands of different rider heights and weights. That’s something we’re seeing a lot more with high-end carbon race frames but is less common on metal bikes.

Taking of sizes, there’s a wide range from 52 to 60cm and Enigma tells us the average frame weight is 1,500g, which is certainly respectable for a titanium frame. As well as those stock sizes, the company can offer full custom sizing, bespoke fittings and a personalised finish via its own paint shop.

Enigma 2102.jpg

The frame will cost £1,699 and the frame and fork £2,087, while complete bikes will start from £3,499 with Shimano 105 rising to £3,999 with Ultegra, including Hunt 4 Season wheels. Frames come with a 10-year warranty. Stock is expected to arrive in February so head over to www.enigmabikes.com if you’re interested.

“The new Etape is more than just a road bike. Whilst the geometry is focused on road use, retaining the sharp handling and responsive ride our frames are famous for, generous tyre clearance, rack and mudguards mounts, combined with a compliant, size specific tube set, create a bike that is suitable for a huge range of riding styles and conditions,” explains Enigma.

Enigma 2097.jpg

That increased tyre clearance certainly gives the new Etape wider scope for mixing up road and off-road riding. And there are obvious parallels with the Kinesis GF_Ti Disc, both providing titanium frames, carbon forks, disc brakes and generous tyre clearance, and are similarly priced.

It looks good, and we’ll hopefully be getting a bike in for review soon so we can see how it performs. Stay tuned for that.

David worked on the road.cc tech team from 2012-2020. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds, and you can now find him over on his own YouTube channel David Arthur - Just Ride Bikes

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14 comments

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds | 6 years ago
1 like

32mm clearance with guards, that's a bit stingy for a disc braked bike, why can't frame builders understand that people don't always want a slack geo'd frameset to be able to fit wider tyres AND use mudguards.

I mean you can already fit 32mm with guards on bikes with std drop caliper brakes so what's the actual point of discs if you aren't going to use them for their supposed main benefit over drop brakes?

PS, it's overpriced in todays current market, a Burls is £1200 for a frame incl a couple of bits (£1130 for the raw frame), a Reilly Spectre is £1499.

Avatar
fukawitribe replied to BehindTheBikesheds | 6 years ago
0 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

what's the actual point of discs if you aren't going to use them for their supposed main benefit over drop brakes?

Eh ? Who is doing this supposing ? It's a factor, but hardly the main one i'd say. Agree with you on the tyre clearance being a bit stingy though, if you're doing a rework on the frame i'd have thought you'd go for more these days.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds replied to fukawitribe | 6 years ago
0 likes
fukawitribe wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

what's the actual point of discs if you aren't going to use them for their supposed main benefit over drop brakes?

Eh ? Who is doing this supposing ? It's a factor, but hardly the main one i'd say. Agree with you on the tyre clearance being a bit stingy though, if you're doing a rework on the frame i'd have thought you'd go for more these days.

Lots, particularly with respect to road bikes and has always been one of the main selling points and for most it is really the only big advantage for road bikes unless you ride carbon wheels a lot and are worried about wearing out your rims.

 

Avatar
fukawitribe replied to BehindTheBikesheds | 6 years ago
0 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

what's the actual point of discs if you aren't going to use them for their supposed main benefit over drop brakes?

Eh ? Who is doing this supposing ? It's a factor, but hardly the main one i'd say. Agree with you on the tyre clearance being a bit stingy though, if you're doing a rework on the frame i'd have thought you'd go for more these days.

Lots, particularly with respect to road bikes and has always been one of the main selling points and for most it is really the only big advantage for road bikes unless you ride carbon wheels a lot and are worried about wearing out your rims.

 

Nah.

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=bike+advantage+disc+vs+rim+brakes

Avatar
Royceston | 6 years ago
0 likes

A thing of beauty. I think this is an ideal "winter" bike (if you can afford the luxury of such a nice second bike), or just for long days in the saddle. I'm also glad they haven't gone for internal routing. I don't understand why some people are so set on it. Ok, you may prefer the aesthetics, but you don't need it on an endurance type bike (or on any bike unless you're racing and aerodynamics play a key part). Replacing internal cables is a PITA! I'm also pleased it's got a threaded bottom bracket. A lovely bike that'll be easy to maintain.

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andyp | 6 years ago
1 like

Glad they've not gone down the internal routing...erm, route. Looks & sounds lovely.

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CXR94Di2 | 6 years ago
0 likes

Hi Richard currently you can get the Tripster V2 plus fork for less around £1850 and even less.

 

 

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EddySpurtz | 6 years ago
2 likes

Richard at Enigma here - thanks for the comments. We would like to point out that external cable routing was a conscious decision, and not related to costs. We prefer external cables for ease of maintenance, and to ensure frame longevity, which is reflected in our warranty. The Kinesis Tripster does not appear to be cheaper, with an RRP of £1850 for the frame compared to ours at £1699, but after a decade of producing titanium frames we invite any comparision with the quality of other brands. Any questions feel free to get in touch directly - sales [at] enigmabikes.com thanks. 

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CXR94Di2 | 6 years ago
0 likes

The Tripster V2 is full internal routing and cheaper

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Tom_in_MN | 6 years ago
0 likes

Clean top tube with this routing makes keeping it clean easy, at least if you sweat like me.  This is what convinced me to try discs.

Odd the disc brake version is not the evolved one.

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Verycroix | 6 years ago
0 likes
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meltonsteve | 6 years ago
3 likes

On my "Next Audax bike" list. Mudguard mounts, external cables, disc brakes etc.

Might have saved up enough by the time my current Equilibrium is unfit for purpose.

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Zjtm231 | 6 years ago
0 likes

Disappointing at that price that there is external cabling..... And off my list as a result

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DoctorFish replied to Zjtm231 | 6 years ago
5 likes
Zjtm231 wrote:

Disappointing at that price that there is external cabling..... And off my list as a result

Really?  And here I was wonding how I'm going to replace the cables on my internally cabled cycle when it finally needs doing. 

 

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