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Glasgow e-bike rider crashes into Italian pros on cycle path, falling into river and ruling Simone Consonni out of world championships

Olympic team pursuit champion Consonni broke his collarbone and wrist in the head-on collision, which also brought down teammate Francesco Lamon

Italian track rider Simone Consonni’s world championships was brought to an abrupt end on Tuesday morning, after a cyclist on an e-bike collided head-on with him and teammate Francesco Lamon as the pair enjoyed a leisurely spin along the River Clyde on one of Glasgow’s cycle paths.

Consonni, an Olympic gold medallist in the team pursuit in 2021, suffered a broken collarbone and wrist in the crash, while fellow team pursuiter Lamon escaped with just a few minor injuries.

The e-bike rider, meanwhile, reportedly fell into the river following the collision, which occurred close to the Italian team’s hotel near Glasgow’s Exhibition Centre.

Cofidis rider Consonni, who picked up a silver medal earlier this week after riding the qualifying stages of the team pursuit alongside Lamon, Filippo Ganna, and Jonathan Milan, was due to line up at the start of the points race this evening, the final session of the track events at this year’s inaugural multi-discipline UCI Cycling World Championships.

He was spotted last night by road.cc at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome sporting a heavily bandaged left wrist and with his arm in a sling, and it was later confirmed that he had sustained a broken right collarbone and a broken left scaphoid when the e-bike rider hit him head on.

> Cyclist suffers serious head injuries after crash with e-bike rider in Glasgow

“I wanted to do two hours to stretch my legs ahead of tomorrow,” the 28-year-old former world champion said last night. “Francesco and I went out and we got on to this narrow cycle path, with this blind left half-turn, and this other cyclist on an e-bike was coming from the other side, with panniers, carrying quite a bit of weight.

“I tried to avoid him by turning to the left but from what I remember he hit me on the right shoulder with his helmet. I did some x-rays, my collarbone is slightly chipped, the left scaphoid is broken.”

After watching the racing from the stands yesterday evening, Consonni, who was ruled out of Italy’s team pursuit final defeat to Denmark due to a “bit of flu”, will now return home to be treated by his national team’s medical staff.

Members of the Italian team have confirmed that the incident was not reported to the police, and it appears unlikely that they will seek to press charges against the e-bike rider.

Ryan joined road.cc in December 2021 and since then has kept the site’s readers and listeners informed and enthralled (well at least occasionally) on news, the live blog, and the road.cc Podcast. After boarding a wrong bus at the world championships and ruining a good pair of jeans at the cyclocross, he now serves as road.cc’s senior news writer. Before his foray into cycling journalism, he wallowed in the equally pitiless world of academia, where he wrote a book about Victorian politics and droned on about cycling and bikes to classes of bored students (while taking every chance he could get to talk about cycling in print or on the radio). He can be found riding his bike very slowly around the narrow, scenic country lanes of Co. Down.

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22 comments

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A V Lowe | 3 months ago
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There are some serious sharp turns with steep ramps where the riverside route goes inland just West of the hotel plus the sharp non radiussed turns where both bridges abruptly butt into the line of the cycle route. To claim it is 'designed' is stretching the imagination - this was not the route we used when the route opened in 1988 with a ride in from Balloch to SEC
Sinec this is on private land there might be a case to highlight this as a RIDDOR with HSE who might look at a reports & recommendations
From my own experience the arrangements for several locations on the cycle routes through SEC campus do not look clever from a full risk audit perspective, hence for speed and comfort I'll often use the carriageway pavement, and I built several parts of this route 1985-1995

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mattw | 11 months ago
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Reflecting, as it is an injury collision, is there not a legal requirement to report it to the police?

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Rendel Harris replied to mattw | 11 months ago
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Interesting question. Does the RTA cover cycle paths?

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quiff replied to Rendel Harris | 11 months ago
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It does cover cycle paths, but I think the requirement to report relates only where a mechanically propelled vehicle is involved - s.170 RTA 1980. Mechanically propelled vehicle doesn't seem to be defined, but it seems to exclude pedal and ebikes. 

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Hirsute | 11 months ago
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"press charges"

Is this what happens under Scottish law ?

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mattw replied to Hirsute | 11 months ago
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"Press Charges" is when the SNP want to stop a story devil.

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check12 | 11 months ago
2 likes

Great daily mail esc headline, careful you don't get headhunted 

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joules1975 replied to check12 | 11 months ago
2 likes

check12 wrote:

Great daily mail esc headline, careful you don't get headhunted 

Agreed, where is the fact that it was an e-bike relevent. It's two cycles, one or both of which were likely traveling too quickly, coming together on what is probably a typically crap piece of infrastructure.

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davecochrane replied to joules1975 | 11 months ago
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It's actually not a bad path. I used to use it all the time - but people riding it too quickly or on the wrong side are things I could definitely imagine happening. 

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Sredlums replied to joules1975 | 11 months ago
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It could be relevant.
E-bike riders are still quite often elderly people who are not always very confident on their bikes, and not really skilled/experienced enough for the higher speeds you easily reach with an e-bike.
To a lesser degree this also goes for many younger e-bike riders, and here in The Netherlands there's also youth who ride like crazy on their (often souped up) e-bikes.

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Cugel replied to Sredlums | 11 months ago
2 likes

Sredlums wrote:

It could be relevant.
E-bike riders are still quite often elderly people who are not always very confident on their bikes, and not really skilled/experienced enough for the higher speeds you easily reach with an e-bike.
To a lesser degree this also goes for many younger e-bike riders, and here in The Netherlands there's also youth who ride like crazy on their (often souped up) e-bikes.

Youare confused about the e-bikes. They're only e-bikes up to 15.5mph, after which they're an ordinary bike, sometimes a very heavy one that's difficult to get to go a lot faster than when the engine is helping (only up to that 15.5mph, I repeat, in case you missed it).

Souped-up e-bike? Not really an e-bike then but a motorbike.

Now, about this age thing ..... In my 74 years of contact with the humans, I've noticed that they can be divided into all sorts of classifications, some meaningful in various contexts (but not others); some not meaningful at all.

One class differentiator is the degree to which a human is considerate of the other humans (and other things, like hedgehogs and drystone walls) or nor considerate. When one juxtaposes this classification on that for age, its noticeable that the considerate and inconsiderate humans are more or less the same proportion in every age group.

Of course, its often nice for a certain kind of thinking to have nice stereotypes concerning, say, older folk, younger folk and even folk who are pink rather than yellow. Sadly these stereotypes often prove to be worthless because they fail to reflect anything real in the world, other than the fact that many humans enjoy their baseless prejudices.   1

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mattw replied to Cugel | 11 months ago
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Leaving aside that E-bikes as a category do not exist in the UK, we don't know whether it was a legal EAPC or an E-motorbike.

Nor do we know that the 'he rode into me' story from the pro-cyclist is an accurate report.

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Cugel | 11 months ago
2 likes

Wots this!? A cycling helmet breaks the bones of a cyclist, perhaps two!!?  Time they were banned for the dangerous things they are.

If the mental states of all concerned were to be examined at the time, I'm sure it would soon be discovered that they were all going too fast for the conditions because they believed that in any crash, "a helmet will save my life". 

Did the e-bike rider's polystyrene hat save him from drowning in the river he fell into by acting as a float?

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hawkinspeter replied to Cugel | 11 months ago
5 likes

Cugel wrote:

Wots this!? A cycling helmet breaks the bones of a cyclist, perhaps two!!?  Time they were banned for the dangerous things they are.

If the mental states of all concerned were to be examined at the time, I'm sure it would soon be discovered that they were all going too fast for the conditions because they believed that in any crash, "a helmet will save my life". 

Did the e-bike rider's polystyrene hat save him from drowning in the river he fell into by acting as a float?

I can't wait for Road.cc's float test of current bike helmets

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Paul J | 11 months ago
4 likes

Sounds maybe like where the "cycle route" by the Clyde by the Broomielaw goes under the Glasgow Bridge or King George V bridge - by the railway bridge. Completely useless path for anything but tootling at walking pace and best generally avoided.

By sounds of it, neither the e-bike rider nor the Italians were at tootling-along pace.

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davecochrane replied to Paul J | 11 months ago
1 like

It says clearly in the article that it was by the SECC.

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Paul J replied to davecochrane | 11 months ago
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Broomielaw isn't far from the SECC. Those bridges are the nearest blind spots on that cycle track that I can think of.

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davecochrane replied to Paul J | 11 months ago
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I'd bet it happened somewhere in this area:

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Paul J replied to davecochrane | 11 months ago
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That's very near the SECC, but it's not blind at all. Plus, the cycle path goes straight there - only the the road that kinks (with good visibility, and not near enough to Clyde for anyone to fall in really).

As per my reply to the other reply, where the path goes under those 2 bridges is the nearest spot I can think of that has blind bends - also very narrow there. Fairly poor standard part of the route, not really suitable for cycling faster than walking speed.

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Dnnnnnn replied to Paul J | 11 months ago
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About 100m East and 200m west of the Bells Bridge there are spots where the path turns away from the river. Visibility isn't great at either of those - although no problem if you slow down a bit and are paying attention. That the collision was sufficient to send the e-bike rider over the barrier into the river suggests there must have been some speed involved...

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HoarseMann replied to Dnnnnnn | 11 months ago
1 like

Looks like quite a big drop over the barriers into the river too.

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Dnnnnnn replied to HoarseMann | 11 months ago
1 like

HoarseMann wrote:

Looks like quite a big drop over the barriers into the river too.

It is!

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