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Cyclist has nose, cheek and thumb broken in road rage attack

Police appeal for witnesses to incident in West Bromwich last Friday

West Midlands Police are hunting for a driver who left a cyclist with a broken nose, cheekbone and thumb in what they have described as a ‘road rage’ attack.

The incident happened at the junction of Bromford Lane and Credenda Road in West Bromwich last Friday 8 May at around 4.30pm.

Police says that the driver of a silver Audi allegedly followed the cyclist and verbally abused before punching him in the face, knocking him off his bike.

The driver is then thought to have driven away towards Sandwell & Dudley Train Station.

The victim, a man aged in his 40s, was treated at hospital for his injuries and needed to have an operation on his thumb. He is now recovering at home.

Rebecca Kendall of Force CID, which is investigating the incident, said: “This is a really nasty roadside assault which resulted in the cyclist suffering a number of broken bones.

“I’m asking people who may have been in the area at the time to think back and let us know if they remember seeing anything or even have dashcam footage which may help our enquiries."

Police described the motorist as “Asian with short dark hair and a beard, in his late 20s or early 30s, about 6ft tall and well built.”

Anyone who has information is asked to contact police via live chat from 8am-midnight at www.west-midlands.police.uk or to call 101 at any time. Alternatively, people can call the charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111.

We have reported on a number of unprovoked attacks on cyclists during lockdown, including one in Sunderland in which a man who used his bike as a mobility aid sustained facial injuries when he fell off it after being struck by an object thrown at him by the occupant of a passing car.

> Cyclist who uses e-bike as mobility aid injured after object thrown from car

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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