TECH NEWS

Coming soon to a head near you? The recycled urban cycle helmet

Re-Cycle range from Dashel uses recycled plastic and can be recycled into new helmets once at the end of its product life.

The Re-Cycle range uses recycled plastic and can be recycled into new helmets once at the end of its product life.

It's not unusual for brands to become more eco-conscious, especially when it comes to a plastics-heavy product like helmets. We've seen quite a few different ideas with cardboard helmets being one of the strangest. Dashel, though, is taking the recycling route with their new urban helmet, the Re-Cycle.

The new urban helmet aims to be “low impact at the point of manufacture and produce very little waste at the end of life”. To achieve this, Dashel says that the helmet is made using recycled plastics and can be recycled again at the end of the helmet’s life.

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Dashel Re-Cycle Urban 1

If you register your new helmet and do end up recycling it, Dashel say they will give you money off a subsequent purchase.

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The Re-Cycle Urban helmet is made in the UK and features five air vents to help with cooling. There’s a vegan leather carrying loop at the back of the helmet for attaching a rear light.

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Internally, the Re-Cycle has an EPS foam body to which the re-cycled plastic shell is attached. There’s also a nifty magnetic Fidlock clasp that Dashel says helps to avoid pinched skin.

Dashel Re-Cycle Urban 4

The padding is removable and washable. A range of these pads come with the helmet to allow you to tailor the fit. Everything comes in a reusable drawstring backpack.

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The shell comes in four colours and the helmet can be bought for £79 in Small (55-57cm) 360g, Medium (57-59cm) 380g, Large (60-62cm) 430g sizes.

dashel.co.uk/re-cycle

Son of a Marathon runner, Nephew of a National 24hr Champion, the racing genetics have completely passed him by. After joining the road.cc staff in 2016 as a reviewer, Liam quickly started writing feature articles and news pieces. After a little time living in Canada, where he spent most of his time eating poutine, Liam returned with the launch of DealClincher, taking over the Editor role at the start of 2018. At the weekend, Liam can be found racing on the road both in the UK and abroad, though he prefers the muddy fields of cyclocross. To date, his biggest race win is to the front of the cafe queue.

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