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Spanish federation must make decision on its own, insists UCI president

Pat McQuaid, president of world cycling’s governing body, the UCI, has refuted reports that the Spanish national federation, the RFEC, had enlisted the help of the UCI and the World-Andi Doping Agency to reach a decision in the Alberto Contador case, and insisted that the RFEC must reach a conclusion on its own.

Speaking in Antwerp, where he was attending the Belgian national cyclo-cross championships, McQuaid stated that contrary to a suggestio in Spanish newspaper El País which claimed that the RFEC had sent documentation to the UCI, reported here on road.cc yesterday, nothing had been received at the organsiation’s offices in Aigle.

Among the reasons given by an anonymous RFEC source for the UCI and WADA becoming involved in the process were that it would speed up matters and also mean that having been part of the decision-making process, there would no delay as might happen if the RFEC made the decision on its own and either of the other parties felt the need to appeal the decision.

However, McQuaid said that in most instances, the majority of national governing bodies were able to resolve doping cases satisfactorily, meaning that the UCI did not often need to seek recourse at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

That may e an oblique reference to the fact that it was only the UCI and WADA taking Alejandro Valverde’s case to the CAS that led to the Spanish cyclist being banned last May for two years, with the RFEC having never opened proceedings against him for his links to Operaion Puerto.
 

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.