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Akis Kollaros's mother says she hopes lessons can be learned from her son's death...

The mother of a cyclist carelessly killed by a tipper truck driver who neither indicated nor checked his mirrors said that she hoped lessons could be learnt from her son’s death.

Robert Taylor, from Dartford, Kent, pleaded guilty at Wood Green Crown Court to causing death by careless driving of 34-year-old cyclist and music producer, Akis Kollaros.

Last year we reported how around £6,000 was raised in just one day through a crowdfunding site to help repatriate to his native Greece the body of Mr Kollaros, who was killed when he was hit by a tipper truck in east London.

More than 300 people, many of them cyclists and including friends and clubmates of the London Dynamo rider, plus others who never met him, donated money through the website, GoFundMe.

Judge Noel Lucas, sentencing Taylor, gave him 20 weeks in prison and a driving ban for 12 months.

Handing down the sentence he said that had Taylor checked his mirrors and indicated when turning left there was "every chance the accident would have been avoided”.

Mr Kollaros' mother, Maria Kollarou, who flew in from Greece for the hearing told the BBC after the sentencing: "Nothing can bring back the son I loved so dearly.

"I sincerely hope that lessons have been learnt from this tragic incident and that cycling on London's roads will become safer as result of Akis's death.

"I wish to offer my support to people who have faced similar situations and hope that we can, together, find a way to ensure that such incidents do not occur again."

Judge Lucas added: "I want it clearly understood by those who drive vehicles of this type that they must take the greatest of care whilst driving in the streets of London to avoid precisely this type of accident."

The collision caused "head injuries that were instantaneously fatal".

Prosecuting Tom Nicholson said: "Had he indicated, his new vehicle was fitted with sensitive safety equipment - these activate a camera on the near side of the vehicle.

"There were also sensors that would have detected movement and when the indicator is depressed there is audible warning equipment - warning of a left turn."

Defending Taylor, Michael Procter said: "He is devastated by what has happened. He will live with this for the rest of his life.”

Last February we reported how an estimated 300 people turned out for a vigil and die-in to commemorate cyclist Mr Kollaros.

Coordinated by campaign group Stop Killing Cyclists, the vigil included the placing of a ghost bike near the spot where Akis died, and speakers including Tom Kearney who was hit by a bus in 2009 and ended up in a coma.

He said: “It is so important to remember and honour these people and to inspire us to change the conditions so no more of these have to take place.”

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.