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TECH NEWS

Hiplok reveals ‘world’s first truly portable bike lock to resist angle-grinder attacks’

Hiplok claims its new 1.8kg lock can withstand attacks from the weapon of choice for professional bike thieves

British security and storage brand Hiplok has launched a 1.8kg portable bike lock solution that it claims is capable of resisting "a severe, sustained angle grinder attack".

> 6 of the best bike locks

2021 Hiplok D1000 IN AIR

Angle grinders are motorised hand tools that are commonly used by professional bicycle and motorcycle thieves as they are highly effectively at cutting through locks, no matter how big or chunky... but “the grind is over”, claims Hiplok, with the launch of its D1000 D-lock. Hiplok want to set a new bar for portable angle grinder-proof locks, given the relatively low weight of 1.8kg (if it is in fact angle-grinder proof - we have one on the way to find out!) 

> Bike locks: how to choose and use the best lock to protect your bike

2021 Hiplok D1000 COLLAGE 1

Ferosafe composite graphene material is used, that according to Hiplok, “effectively resists high power angle grinders due to its unique chemical and physical properties”.

2021 Hiplok D1000 TESTING

Independently tested by Sold Secure and carrying their top level Diamond rating, Hiplok’s D1000 should also stand up to all other traditional methods of attack.

Its square profile hardened steel core should protect against tools such as bolt croppers, and the D1000 also features Hiplok’s anti-rotation double locking tabs found in all its D-locks. With this technology thieves will need to cut through both sides to steal the bike, according to Hiplok. 

> “It makes you feel powerless” – victims in UK's bike theft capital share their frustrations

The 1.8kg lock is available with an optional Carry Pouch for transporting on the handlebars or pannier rack of the bike, or the waist via the integrated belt loops.       

2021 Hiplok D1000 CARRY POUCH

A hard-wearing rubberised outer surface of the lock is also included to prevent the D1000 from scratching the frame when locked up.

Its rubberised weatherproof key seal should protect against elements, while the scalloped design ensures easy access when wearing gloves.

2021 Hiplok D1000 STANDING GLASS

With an internal locking dimension of 155mm high by 92mm wide, and overall dimensions of 225mm high by 155mm wide by 40mm deep, Hiplok says this sizing is ideal for portability, locking convenience, weight and security.  

With a claimed weight of 1.8kg, that’s really quite impressive. US brand Altor Locks created the first angle grinder-proof bike lock back in 2019, but it was not one for carrying around with you; the SAF Lock is a meaty 6.2kg.

Compared to other Diamond rated D-Locks, the D1000 is around double the weight. Master Lock’s Mini U-Lock is the lightest I’ve come across and it's 929g. This difference seems reasonable enough to me, if the D1000 really is angle grinder-proof.

Hiplok is launching the D1000 lock via a Kickstarter campaign which can be found over here, and production is already underway with delivery expected to be in early 2022. You can 'secure' one for £150 if you're one of the first 150 backers, which is a 40% discount off the eventual RRP which will be £250. £168 gets you the lock and a carry pouch, and then the next set of backers after the first 150 will get a 20% discount. 

hiplok.com

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54 comments

Avatar
grOg | 2 years ago
2 likes

Now to find something to lock it to that a grinder won't cut through..

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spaceyjase replied to grOg | 2 years ago
1 like

Or just cut through the bike frame; actually happened to me.

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Robert Hardy replied to spaceyjase | 2 years ago
0 likes

Wheels and group set are probably safer to steal and fence on a high end bike than the whole bike.

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Secret_squirrel replied to Robert Hardy | 2 years ago
2 likes

But you're unlikely to see a tea leaf sitting next to a locked bike frantically unscrewing the rear mech and shifters.  Even with wheels which could be liberated quickly its pretty obvious they are being nicked.

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Dave Dave | 2 years ago
0 likes

If you believe this, I have some magic beans to sell you. Zero chance the claims are true. By the sound of it they're pretending a dremel or mini grinder is a proper angle grinder as used by thieves.

Reality is a proper angle grinder with a 300mm+ cutting disc will make short work of titanium bar, hardened steel, anti-cut rollers in door locks, and so-on. There is no possibility of building a bike lock that will prevent your bike from being stolen. There is only deterrence, and almost none of that since people will ignore the most blatant thievery.

It is currently not advisable to lock up your bike in public and leave it unattended. There is no suitable anti-theft mechanism available.

The ony real solution to this is to vastly increase the sentences for bike theft and related crimes.

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Sriracha replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
4 likes

You watched the video over at Cycling Weekly? You say they are in on the conspiracy?

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Dave Dave replied to Sriracha | 2 years ago
0 likes
Sriracha wrote:

You watched the video over at Cycling Weekly? You say they are in on the conspiracy?

No, I think they're daft or stupid.

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whizzo replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
3 likes

There are some tests and it is a lot more resistant to proper angle grinders. It's still possible to cut but it takes a long time and multiple discs... and you have to cut through it twice.

https://gearjunkie.com/biking/hiplok-d1000-bike-lock-review

Constructed with layers of resistant "ferosafe" material. But I guess unless what you are locking it to and your frame is made of the same material then it's just shifting the weakest point.

Still pretty impressive IMO and I'd be tempted if I regularly parked outside.

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Dave Dave replied to whizzo | 2 years ago
0 likes
whizzo wrote:

There are some tests and it is a lot more resistant to proper angle grinders. It's still possible to cut but it takes a long time and multiple discs... and you have to cut through it twice.

Yes, that's the bit that's bollocks. Bigger angle grinder will go straight through - and through both sides at once if lined up correctly.

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DrG82 replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
7 likes

But people aren't running around with 12 inch/300 mm grinders/disc cutters they are running around with 4.5 inch/115 mm battery powered grinders.

I'd even go as far as saying that if Hiplock are confident in their testing they have overengineered their lock, seeing as they claim they needed 10 discs to cut through it. Thieves aren't taking spare discs, and certainly not 10 of them.

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Steve K replied to DrG82 | 2 years ago
5 likes

In any case, it's a bit like the old joke about two guys running away from a lion.  One says to the other - there's no point, we can't run faster than a lion; and the other says, I don't need to, I just need to run faster than yours.  Thieves will go for the easiest bike to steal.

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Dave Dave replied to Steve K | 2 years ago
0 likes
Steve K wrote:

In any case, it's a bit like the old joke about two guys running away from a lion.  One says to the other - there's no point, we can't run faster than a lion; and the other says, I don't need to, I just need to run faster than yours.  Thieves will go for the easiest bike to steal.

Judging by what I see at my local station on a regular basis, they actually go for the expensive bikes with good locks in preference to the BSOs with cheap locks.

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Xenophon2 replied to Steve K | 2 years ago
1 like

If that were true, my Canyon Grail or my upstairs neighbours' Pinarello might still be attached with their respective serious U-locks to the fixed anchors in the common bike room, while the unlocked and unattached clunker from the ground floor owner would have been stolen.  Things didn't turn out that way.  

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Dave Dave replied to DrG82 | 2 years ago
0 likes
DrG82 wrote:

But people aren't running around with 12 inch/300 mm grinders/disc cutters they are running around with 4.5 inch/115 mm battery powered grinders.

We're talking about bike thieves. They use whatever is needed. They aren't 'running around'. There's one who carries the tools, one who rides the bike away, and one in a van round the corner. It's carefully planned.

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Tom_77 replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
4 likes

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

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Hirsute replied to Tom_77 | 2 years ago
1 like

Would you not need 3 folk to use that ?
One to cut
One to hold
One to take the holder to a&e

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Dave Dave replied to Tom_77 | 2 years ago
0 likes
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) What you've seen is irrelevant. There are battery powered versions of the same. (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

The power required varies considerably depending on what thickness of cutting disc you use. Bike thieves can go for the narrowest possible disc - cutting, rather than grinding.

B) The cost is well in the range of what 'professional' bike thieves spend on cutting tools. Good bolt croppers cost hundreds too. A van costs more.

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oceandweller replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
1 like
Dave Dave wrote:
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) [...] (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

No, I think the disc is 300mm. For men, the distance from the point of the elbow to the 1st knuckle is typically 300mm or so (for example, it's 330mm on me & I'm a slightly-above-average-for-the-UK 1.77m tall). Measuring off the photo, it looks like the disc diameter is a whisper less than the length of the operator's elbow-to-knuckle.

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wycombewheeler replied to oceandweller | 2 years ago
3 likes
oceandweller wrote:
Dave Dave wrote:
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) [...] (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

No, I think the disc is 300mm. For men, the distance from the point of the elbow to the 1st knuckle is typically 300mm or so (for example, it's 330mm on me & I'm a slightly-above-average-for-the-UK 1.77m tall). Measuring off the photo, it looks like the disc diameter is a whisper less than the length of the operator's elbow-to-knuckle.

shhhh he has been telling Mrs Dave that his tool is 300mm for years

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
6 likes
Dave Dave wrote:
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) What you've seen is irrelevant. There are battery powered versions of the same. (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

Funny, because just out of curiosity I just Googled 300mm cordless electric angle grinders and nobody seems to make one, the biggest available disc is 230mm. Could you provide an example or should we just assume you're making it up?

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Dave Dave replied to Rendel Harris | 2 years ago
0 likes
Rendel Harris wrote:
Dave Dave wrote:
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) What you've seen is irrelevant. There are battery powered versions of the same. (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

Funny, because just out of curiosity I just Googled 300mm cordless electric angle grinders and nobody seems to make one, the biggest available disc is 230mm. Could you provide an example or should we just assume you're making it up?

Your weak google-fu leads you to conclude people are lying about claims that are in no way extraordinary? Mate, you have a problem. Seek help.

Avatar
Tom_77 replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
5 likes

Rules Of The Internet

Avatar
Sriracha replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
2 likes
Dave Dave wrote:
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) What you've seen is irrelevant. There are battery powered versions of the same. (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

Damn, you've got an eagle eye there - it's actually 305mm (to begin with, at least).
https://www.toolden.co.uk/power-tools/cordless-power-tools/cordless-saws...

Avatar
Dave Dave replied to Sriracha | 2 years ago
0 likes
Sriracha wrote:
Dave Dave wrote:
Tom_77 wrote:

Only angle grinders with 300mm cutting discs I've seen are petrol powered ones like this. It costs £640, weighs 8.5kg and it's not exactly low-key.

A) What you've seen is irrelevant. There are battery powered versions of the same. (Also, it looks to me like that's an even bigger one than 300mm in your picture.)

Damn, you've got an eagle eye there - it's actually 305mm (to begin with, at least). https://www.toolden.co.uk/power-tools/cordless-power-tools/cordless-saws...

Heh, I meant like 450mm or something. Just bad guesstimating  1

Avatar
Sriracha replied to Dave Dave | 2 years ago
2 likes
Dave Dave wrote:

I have some magic beans to sell you

I think your supplier may have hoodwinked you about those. How much did you pay?

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Tom_77 | 2 years ago
1 like

This is rated Motorcycle Diamond (in addition to Bicycle Diamond). AFAIK the only other locks available with this rating are massive chain locks like the Oxford Beast - 3.6kg for the lock and another 12kg for the chain.

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brooksby | 2 years ago
1 like

I bought a Kryptonite New York mini (the Fahgeddaboutit) for nearly £100, and I thought that was horrendously expensive.

I suspect that the group of people who can happily afford to buy a £200 lock are not the same group of people who would happily carry such a weighty lock around with them (even in what actually looks like a really good lock carrying pouch).

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OnYerBike replied to brooksby | 2 years ago
7 likes

Cargo bike users are probably a notable exception - expensive bike but no issue carrying around an extra 2kg of lock.

Another scenario would be people who can leave a lock in-situ at their destination (i.e. leave it on the office bike racks) and so don't have to lug it around all the time. 

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brooksby replied to OnYerBike | 2 years ago
0 likes

I guess, but aren't many office bike racks in locations that make them slightly less vulnerable to lairy blokes with angle grinders?

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OnYerBike replied to brooksby | 2 years ago
2 likes
brooksby wrote:

I guess, but aren't many office bike racks in locations that make them slightly less vulnerable to lairy blokes with angle grinders?

Some are, but some aren't. I've certainly heard stories of theives targetting office bike racks - often tucked away out of sight and away from passing members of the public, and the owner unlikely to return until the end of the working day.

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