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Verdict: 
Properly technical jacket for going fast in changeable conditions while remaining cool
Weight: 
250g
Contact: 

The Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring Fall is a cracking choice for riding hard in the cooler seasons, where changeable weather is the norm. With beautifully engineered technical features, it doesn't put a foot wrong. Just be aware that it expects you to work, and keep working.

  • Pros: Excellent thermal regulation – almost to a fault, technical features, warranty
  • Cons: Signature Assos price

Assos of Switzerland has the tagline 'sponsor yourself'. It isn't afraid to price accordingly pro, and you pretty much get what you pay for. Anecdotally, the gear lasts and lasts – friends have Assos kit that's over a decade old, that's ridden hard year in, year out. But longevity wouldn't amount to a hill of beans if it weren't comfortable and functional to boot. Fortunately, in the Mille GT Spring Fall jacket, it's nailed both.

> Find your nearest dealer here

The Mille GT Spring Fall is classed as a jacket, not a jersey. At the front the triple-layer high-vis chest panel (other colours are available – with a blue panel and, for £170, black-fronted) is rated at 10,000mm of water head – i.e. waterproof, and it's windproof too.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - collar.jpg

Around the stomach, shoulders and front of the arms is a thermal brushed fabric, while across the back and under the arms a lighter, non-thermal fabric aids cooling and sweat loss. There's no DWR-treatment, mind – if it's going to rain for prolonged periods you'll be needing an actual waterproof. 

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - material panels.jpg

Technical features abound. The full-length zip features a flap and garage at the top, the hem has a dual-stretch multi-angle design that keeps things snug when bent over, with the obligatory silicone grippers at the back, and there are reflective accents down each side.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - zip flap.jpg

The 1.5in cuffs are strongly elasticated to keep the long sleeves put under your gloves, and the pockets feature Assos' 'triple ramp' retention flaps.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - sleeve.jpg

These are a simple idea but work so well. You slide whatever – a pump, a tool roll, a phone – into the pocket, then the flap that's sewn into the jersey side goes over the top, preventing your stuff being ejected. Very simple.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - pockets.jpg

Assos offers a three-month no-quibble return on any fault you may find, and a free one-year crash repair or replace policy. Just as well, because if you trash a £165 jacket on your first outing you're likely going to be more worried about your wallet than any injuries.

I reviewed the Mille GT Spring Fall in a Scottish autumn, with temperatures varying between 5 and 12 degrees, mixed wind and sun, and a bit of rain. Safe to say, 'Spring Fall' pretty much covered there. I run pretty cold, and need to keep my forearms toasty to ward off Reynaud's Syndrome in my hands when circulation shuts down no matter how thick the gloves. The Mille GT paired with a 100gsm merino long-sleeve layer did the job, so long as I kept working at 80% of max heart rate.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - rear.jpg

I could feel the fleece insulating my forearms and biceps at the same time moisture was evaporating from the rear of my arms and back. Over many hours I never felt cold, nor hot – rather, always aware my temperature was just right to push on fast. Certainly if I'd been bimbling along I'd have needed something warmer, but this appears to be Assos' market – people who want to go hard pretty much the whole ride. The totally windproof and waterproof front panel occasionally got zipped down a bit on longer climbs, but never felt sweaty, nor did the stomach area.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - riding.jpg

Pairing the Mille GT with a thin, pocketable windstop jacket over the top upped the insulation enough to comfortably ride in low single digit temperatures while maintaining breathability. Clearly overkill on the front waterproof panel, but for me keeping hands working through warm arms is critical.

Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring-Fall Fluo Yellow - hem.jpg

I reviewed a size Medium, which was bang on for my 75kg/6ft tall/38in chest with long arms (and bang on with Assos' fit chart). The arm fit in particular was a very pleasant surprise; I'm used to cuts being an inch or two short which is definitely not what you want in a spring or autumn jacket, when you're likely to be layering long-cuffed gloves. (It's not me in the photos, by the way.)

> Buyer's Guide: 23 of the best winter cycling jackets

The £150 Endura Pro SL Thermal Windproof is of a similar ilk, not a total waterproof but good for cooler days out with a bit of a sprinkle not posing a problem. Steve did note the short arms being an issue, mind, something Assos has sorted to ensure no gaps between gloves and sleeves.

> How to dress for cycling in autumn

Yes, it's a lot of cash for a mixed-up chameleon of a product like the Mille GT Spring Fall. It's too technical/pricey to replace a single-fabric jersey, and layering under a proper 100 per cent waterproof jacket seems overkill. And if it starts to pour or gets seriously cold you'll be soaked or freezing after a while. It's best regarded as Baby Bear's porridge for the written-on-the-tin non-torrential Spring Fall season days, offering protection where it counts from rain, spray and wind while you fang along at a rate of knots among the green shoots or the falling leaves.

Verdict

Properly technical jacket for going fast in changeable conditions while remaining cool

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Assos Mille GT Jacket Spring/Fall

Size tested: Medium

Tell us what the jacket is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

It's for going fast in cooler seasons, with a slim fit and technical features.

Assos says: "The cool, sometimes wet, and constantly shifting weather patterns of fall and spring inspired the textile blend for our versatile new MILLE GT Spring/Fall Jacket. We see it as a fine cross between a thermal LS jersey and a membrane-equipped shell''perfectly suitable for mild days in the saddle and essential when conditions take a turn for the wet and windy.

 

"Cut in our revised MILLE regularFit, the Spring/Fall Jacket is less compressive than our racingFit apparel, providing a clean silhouette when paired with a jersey or base layer. The upper front panel is constructed using our NEOS MILD, which is a 3L softshell with PU bonded membrane. Highly breathable, water-resistant, and 100% windproof, this flexible house-developed textile ensures your chest stays fully protected from rain, road spray, biting winds, and low temps. For a touch of insulation, we included our brushed bi-stretch RX material along the abdominal and tops of the arms, with Type.157 on the central back panel and underside of the arms for boosted breathability. In the back is our Triple Ramp Pocket system that locks in your cargo, the spring/fall (2/3) climaCode graphic on the upper panel, and a set of reflective strips on the lower left and right sides."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the jacket?

From Assos:

NEOS MILD: A patented 3L windproof and highly breathable softshell constructed with a PU bonded membrane for added water-repellency. Weight: 260g/m2; Breathability: MVP 20,000g/m2/24h; Water Column: >10,000mm; Elasticity: 4-way stretch.

RX: A brushed bi-stretch warp-knit fabric developed to wick moisture and add light insulation.

Type.157 Stripe Tex: Our proprietary breathable and stretchy circular knit textile with built-in UV protection and odorControl.

2W waistWave: Stitch construction on the waist preserves the natural stretch of the front panel's textile, absent of elastic material.

Triple Ramp Pockets: Flexible fabric panels sewn into each of the three pockets create "lids" for your cargo, covering the contents for added security and stability.

Full-Length Zipper: Temperature regulation courtesy of a lightweight full-length zipper with camlock.

Reflective Accents: Placed on the sides of the outer pockets for added visibility.

Abdominal Cut: Triangulated pattern on the abdominal area provides a smooth, comfortable wrap.

Raglan Cut: Sleeve design free of a traditional shoulder seam, continuing up to the neck for greater range of motion.

regularFit: Optimized for total comfort in the riding position, with a more relaxed cut than our second-skin racingFit.

Rate the jacket for quality of construction:
 
9/10

Beautifully made – not a stitch out of place.

Rate the jacket for performance:
 
8/10

It lets you stay dry and comfy whilst going hard.

Rate the jacket for durability:
 
8/10

It still looks new, after a month of washing.

Rate the jacket for waterproofing based on the manufacturer's rating:
 
8/10

The chest panel does indeed appear to be totally waterproof – but kind of moot as it's surrounded by non-waterproof panels.

Rate the jacket for breathability based on the manufacturer's rating:
 
10/10

Yep, it breathes like nothing I've ever work before in this use case.

Rate the jacket for fit:
 
10/10

Love the fit – if you're broad of shoulder and long of arm, it's a cracker.

Rate the jacket for sizing:
 
10/10

Spot on, to the mm.

Rate the jacket for weight:
 
9/10

At 250g, for the technical features, it's pretty darn light.

Rate the jacket for comfort:
 
9/10

The cut of the panels come together to wrap you like a glove.

Rate the jacket for value:
 
5/10

£165 is a lot of cash for a two-season non-waterproof, but if you want to be perfectly balanced in the shoulder seasons, this is the one to do it in.

How easy is the jacket to care for? How did it respond to being washed?

Still looks like new, in a common wool wash.

Tell us how the jacket performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Can't fault it. Perfect.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the jacket

The pockets are rather nifty, as are the lovely long sleeves.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the jacket

Maybe more visibility from the back...

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market including ones recently tested on road.cc?

The £150 Endura Pro SL Thermal Windproof is probably the closest fit – so at £165 Assos isn't far off the mark.

Did you enjoy using the jacket? Yes

Would you consider buying the jacket? Yes

Would you recommend the jacket to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

Yes, it's £165 for a garment you'll likely wear 4-5 months of the year tops. My rating of 4.5 stars – 'exceptional' – is based on the specific use case of clothing to go fast in, in the cooler seasons where changeable weather makes wind and rain a likelihood but not a certainty on a given ride. Yes, that's a niche use case, but it would be unfair to compare the Mille GT Spring Fall against a generic multi-season jersey or jacket. It's a specific hybrid of a product, for a specific use case. Considered in that regard, it is indeed exceptional at what it does.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 46  Height: 183cm  Weight: 72kg

I usually ride: Merida Ride 5000 Disc  My best bike is: Velocite Selene

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: A few times a week  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo-cross, club rides, general fitness riding, mountain biking, Dutch bike pootling.

13 comments

Avatar
antares [1 post] 1 week ago
0 likes

I just sent one of these back, want to share some thoughts. Was looking for a softshell jersey for Swedish autumn/spring with a temp range primarly +5C to +10, when it gets too cold in my 2 years old Castelli Perfetto Light. Ordered Perfetto ROS Long Sleeve but it fitted quite poorly in the shoulders thanks to weirdly placed seams, so also ordered Assos in black and Etxeondo Sekur in red to pick one and send others back.

I would say Assos is just a bit warmer than Perfetto Light with the arm warmers, with slightly thicker frontal part but the back side is more or less the same. They never state the temp range but I would say +9 to +15, otherwise you'll need thick base layers like Mike used, something I didn't want to go for.

Etxeondo is pretty much the same as Perfetto Long Sleeve, so I expect to use it with the mash base layer for range +5 to +15. It looks relatively boring, has no vent pockets, but fit is much better than Castelli so I decided to keep it and send two others back.

Otherwise Assos is very-very nice and high quality product, spent few days trying to find a reason to keep it along with Etxeondo but didn't want to let go Perfetto Light  1 So if you don't have a good early autumn / late spring jersey this one would be a great option.

Avatar
KoenM [140 posts] 1 week ago
1 like

Assos have good products BUT and there is a big BUT most of them are hideous and the others are just boring, I mean this is happening for years now, they only get uglier/more boring every year, they should fire whoever is in charge of this! How difficult can it be, they asking alot more than for example Sportfull but those look awesome! 

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [456 posts] 1 week ago
2 likes

Mike, you used the term "technical" six times in this review. I challenge you to provide a definition of it.

I don't see anything special about this jacket. A cheap fleece jersey paired with a windblocking vest would perform just as well and be more versatile.

Avatar
CyclingInBeastMode [175 posts] 1 week ago
1 like

Using the word "bicep" when clearly has twigs for arms, lol, maybe use 'upper arms' instead, it would come across better and refer to all the parts that the jacket sleeve covers intead of it to a specific area.

And you had to unzip going uphill, so you had to do that to compensate for the fact that you were running too hot when pushing on ... hmmm.

I'm all for a quality bit of kit but honestly this doesn't do anything that other long sleeves half the price and even lower don't do. 

 

Avatar
Chris Hayes [464 posts] 1 week ago
1 like

My Assos Air Block jackets are still going strong after 20 years - just the reflectors on the back have peeled off: and that makes these probably the wisest GBP180 I've spent on cycling clothing. 

Having inspected the GT Mille this very afternoon, I quickly came to the conclusion that it would be insufficient for today's weather in the Ashdown Forest (+/- 10). And it doesn't feel any way near at robust as my Airblocks.

I agree with much of the sentiment on here regarding Assos.  The Bonka winter jacket is a decent garment - but at GBP 360 and with an effing stupid name to boot - I think my Airblocks will see me out.  They come up on eBay from time-to-time....you'd be better off buying one of those. 

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [456 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
Chris Hayes wrote:

My Assos Air Block jackets are still going strong after 20 years

I suspect you are exaggerating the age of it. Laminates, such as "Air Block", usually delaminate with age. Also elastane in fabric deteriorates with age, even if the garment is never put in a dryer (or even worn!)

Avatar
Skimpy1 [7 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

I have a 20 year old Airblock jacket. The Airblock laminate is fine. The fleece back is now so thin, that you can see through it. Therefore, I conclude that Airblock does not delaminate with age but that other fabrics will wear out eventually. I also conclude that this was £90 well spent in a sale.

Avatar
KiwiMike [1430 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

Mike, you used the term "technical" six times in this review. I challenge you to provide a definition of it. I don't see anything special about this jacket. A cheap fleece jersey paired with a windblocking vest would perform just as well and be more versatile.

 

Technical: Let's go with 'involving or concerned with applied and industrial sciences.'

Notable  things:

Use of multiple fabrics, in the right places, to either block rain/spray/wind, insulate, or allow evaporation

Cut of garment, to keep things close-fitting, not flappy and therefore more aero

 

A 'cheap fleece jersey' would be either too thin on the arms, or too thick on the back. One of the two. 

Putting a windblocking vest over the top would mean another garmet (weight), less access to pockets, something else to unzip if needed, etc. And it wouldn't be waterproof where needed.

 

Look, no-one's holding a gun to your head to buy this. If you want to spend £30 in Sports Direct buying a cheap fleece jersey and a windblocking vest, that's grand. Assos unashamedly makes high-performance garments for people who want the best performance, and in this case, for a particular season / weather type.

Imagine a world where the only products on offer were one person's idea of what represents justifiable spend and neccessary performance. 

Avatar
KiwiMike [1430 posts] 1 week ago
1 like
CyclingInBeastMode wrote:

Using the word "bicep" when clearly has twigs for arms, lol, maybe use 'upper arms' instead, it would come across better and refer to all the parts that the jacket sleeve covers intead of it to a specific area.

And you had to unzip going uphill, so you had to do that to compensate for the fact that you were running too hot when pushing on ... hmmm.

I'm all for a quality bit of kit but honestly this doesn't do anything that other long sleeves half the price and even lower don't do. 

Ignoring the slight upon the upper-body musculature of our model...

The reason there's a zip is to allow cooling when warranted. It's not an admission of failure. I have a nordic skiing jersey that I've unzipped in -10 degrees C and a howling gale - because I was working hard, and didn't want a layer of sweat to build up that would then chill me once the effort decreased. 

This product is designed to work across a range of temperatures when going fast. That means specificity and compromise. Too thin and you'd freeze, too thick and you'd sweat buckets. Yes, other products are available, and I've used many of them. This one, for the use case, is one of the best I've ever worn. 

 

Avatar
KoenM [140 posts] 1 week ago
1 like
KiwiMike]</p>

<p>[quote=Disfunctional_Threshold

wrote:

Look, no-one's holding a gun to your head to buy this. If you want to spend £30 in Sports Direct buying a cheap fleece jersey and a windblocking vest, that's grand. Assos unashamedly makes high-performance garments for people who want the best performance, and in this case, for a particular season / weather type.

Imagine a world where the only products on offer were one person's idea of what represents justifiable spend and neccessary performance. 

While this is all true, there are BETTER clothing for less money (that's why I don't understand the high score), and that looks alot more like high-end clothing. This is overpriced high-end clothing that looks like B-Twin clothing!
Sorry but I'm very dissappointed in Assos the last few years, if want to ask alot more money for about the same performance than at least let it LOOK good! 
I think they trust so much on their name and logo that they aren't in touch anymore, if I see people sponsored by Assos (like Juliet Elliott and GCN) I never think, wow that looks good, I want to buy it! 

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [456 posts] 1 week ago
1 like
KiwiMike]<p>[quote=Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

A 'cheap fleece jersey' would be either too thin on the arms, or too thick on the back. One of the two. 

That's what Assos would like you to believe. I don't find it to the be case.

KiwiMike wrote:

And it wouldn't be waterproof where needed.

This jersey/jacket is only waterproof on the chest. At least with a vest, you could get chest and back coverage. Thus the vest is more versatile.

Avatar
Chris Hayes [464 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

The article is a bit confusing on the subject of it being waterproof.  Early on it says that the front is waterproof  - though only the yellow bit (which in my view is pointless), but then adds that there is no DWP and that if it rains persistently, then you'll need a rain jacket - presumably a Sturmprinz at GBP 395?

Nothing against Assos, though the bloke in the adverts is a bit metro - and their design went a bit Kraftwerk for a while, but have been lusting after a Bonka jacket since laying my eyes upon one....trouble is my Air Block won't die! 

Avatar
peted76 [1622 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

All the Assos gear I have is all excellent. 

I have to agree that a lot of their products are not aesthetically pleasing, but I think the latest couple of seasons are far better than previous years. I think this jacket/jersey looks good, the review says it's right for a specific kind of riding and temp, and for me, that could work.