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Verdict: 
Simple and effective lubricant that'll take care of the majority of jobs on the bike
Weight: 
400g

TF2 Lubricant Smart Spray with Teflon is a great solution to keeping your bike and components running smoothly and squeak-free, taking pretty much everything in its stride.

  • Pros: Stands up well to bad weather; smart spray head works better than the straw
  • Cons: Can get washed off your chain quite quickly in really heavy rain

It's an ideal spray can to keep in your shed or toolkit for general maintenance on your bike, whether post-wash or keeping things running smoothly through the various seasons.

> Find your nearest dealer here

> Buy this online here

The test period has seen me riding various bikes through the snow and subsequent salt-covered roads, through to dry and dusty gravel rides in warm and sunny conditions.

Storing a test bike in the shed after one of the snowy rides without cleaning it left it with a fair amount of rusty, stiff links in the chain – not surprising, as all that had been on the chain before the ride was the original coating from the manufacturer. After a bit of a soaking with TF2, once in the evening and once the following morning, it soon had everything moving freely and looking clean and shiny.

TF2 isn't as thick as some non-spray chain oils, so the only thing I would say is that if you ride a lot in heavy rain with lots of road spray then you'll find that it washes off quite easily and you'll need to reapply it religiously.

For more run-of-the-mill conditions it lasts surprisingly well. I've been using it weekly on my winter bike where it has been keeping the gears, brakes and bottom bracket running smoothly and quietly.

Going off road in the wet and dry, TF2 has also worked well without seeming to attract too much in the way of grit and dust.

The lubricant is available in the standard aerosol or this new Smart Spray version, which has a foldaway nozzle that removes the need to keep poking the small straw into the top. It's much better for getting into nooks and crannies, and the large button is easy to use from all angles.

Weldtite TF2 Lubricant Smart Spray with Teflon-2.jpg

Value-wise, at £7.99 (400ml) it looks a better bet than the WD-40 Bike All Conditions Lube which costs £6.49 for 250ml. TF2 sounds like it performs better too.

It also works out cheaper than B'twin's Teflon Aerosol Lubricant, which is £3.99 for 150ml and has no straw to target the spray.

Overall, TF2 lubricant does a great general maintenance job for a decent price, and only high-mileage, all-weather riders might need something more specialist for their chain.

At the time of writing, the new smart-spray option isn't readily available to buy online (at least not without a premium) but we're assured by Weldtite (TF2 is a Weldtite brand) that it is stocked by independent bike shops – find your nearest using the link at the start of the review.

Verdict

Simple and effective lubricant that'll take care of the majority of jobs on the bike

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: TF2 Lubricant Smart Spray with Teflon

Size tested: 400ml

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Weldtite says, "TF2 Lubricant Spray with Teflon is an advanced, multi-purpose lubricant with excellent dirt repellence, water resistance and anti-corrosion effects."

In the Weldtite catalogue it says:

TF2 ULTIMATE SMART SPRAY

Our best-selling line just got better. The evolution of our TF2 Ultimate Spray now includes an innovative SMART head with integrated straw for better penetration and less wastage.

> Repels dirt and cleans surfaces leaving a protective film

> Enhanced with Teflon™ surface protector

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Teflon® surface protector coating with high lubricity

Built-in repellant to disperse water

High penetration into bearing surfaces of chain

Repels dirt and cleans surfaces leaving protective film

Also suitable for motorcycles, cars, boats, etc

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for value:
 
7/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

You can't really knock it for general bike maintenance.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Ease of use and overall performance.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Can wash off quickly in heavy rain.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

It's one of the cheapest we've tested.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

Some more expensive specialist products may work better on the chain for extreme weather, but this still covers most of the bases really well.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 40  Height: 180cm  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: This month's test bike  My best bike is: B'Twin Ultra CF draped in the latest bling test components

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, fixed/singlespeed

Stu knocked out his first road.cc review back in 2009 and since then he's chucked the best part of seventy test bikes around the West Country, a couple of them quite literally! With three alloy and two steel bikes in his fleet he's definitely a metal man (that'll be the engineering background) but is slowly warming to that modern carbon fibre stuff along with fat tyres & disc brakes.
It's not all nostalgia though, after spending the last few years in product design Stu keeps banging on about how 3D printing is going to be the next big thing and he's a sucker for a beautiful paint job too.

11 comments

Avatar
ktache [1286 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

I do like the smart spray head, I think my big can of WD40 (never on the bike) has something similar.  I miss the Finish Line trigger, and still have some.  It's nice when they think about the applicator as well as the lube, even though I didn't get on the the Muc-Off wet ceramic, or the wet which I preferred, the nozzle is brilliant.  Finish Line wet, my favorite, has a very basic nozzle, much more difficult to control drop size.

Avatar
bechdan [203 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

Avatar
zero_trooper [278 posts] 1 week ago
1 like
bechdan wrote:

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

The WD-40 referred to - WD-40 All Conditions - contains PTFE, which I believe is the same thing.

There's loads of these sprays about, I suspect all of a muchness, so it probably comes down to price and as Ktache points out, the practicality of the applicator (bit of a tongue-twister!).

Avatar
janusz0 [317 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
zero_trooper wrote:

There's loads of these sprays about, I suspect all of a muchness, so it probably comes down to price and as Ktache points out, the practicality of the applicator (bit of a tongue-twister!).

Whether or not they're much of a muchness must depend on the size of the teflon particles in the oil spray. The teflon particles need to be small enough* to move into the gaps between the pins and the bushes of your chain and stay there to coat the potential wear surfaces.  (If they don't, the journals wear, the gaps get bigger, your chain "stretches" and the teeth start to deform.)

I guess I'm pondering this because I've just got to the point, this week,  when I need to replace my chainrings, chain and most of the sprockets** on my hack.  So thank you Spa Cycles and Probikeshop for the quick delivery of my orders, the speed of which matched this week's amazing deterioration from calm pedalling to annoying skipping in many gears.  Luckily the rest of my bike hasn't heard of the wonderful one-hoss shay!

*Sprays that I can find, that quote their particle sizes, are 2-3 μm, 3.7 μm and 5 μm.  I guess that smaller is better so maybe I should buy Sigma Aldrich 1 μm PTFE powder and mix my own lubricant?  Then again, maybe I don' want to be breathing PTFE dust.

**No half measures, I'm replacing all the sprockets.

For the record, I'm old enough to remember using Duckhams graphite grease to soak motorcycle and bicycle chains.  (You put the tin on the cooker and heated it until your cleaned chain sank into the liquid.  Then you hung the chain up to let the excess grease drip off.  Woe betide you if you forgot to turn the cooker off!)  Graphite was the only dry lubricant that we had in those days. (Cue: "shoebox in the middle of the road ...")

Avatar
AlanW [3 posts] 5 days ago
3 likes
bechdan wrote:

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

There's  a bit of marketing and trade mark semantics involved, as Du Pont Teflon® = PTFE   but PTFE is not Teflon.  I actually designed the original TF2 spray 25 years ago along with quite a few other of their products -- ICI's (as was) version of PTFE was called Fluon so we could have used that instead but everyone knew Teflon so we stuck with that and also gained the rights to use the Du Pont trademark. GT85 and WD40 can say they contain PTFE but they can't use the word Teflon unless it is indeed Du Pont Teflon. That's why they only say 'PTFE'.

BTW PTFE powder is all but insoluble so if anyone wanted to mix their own with eg a synthetic oil, eventually the PTFE will drop out and fall to the bottom. It likely won't distribute uniformly throughout a bottle of oil. I did some trials of this at the time and they weren't very successful.

-- Alan W

Avatar
Welsh boy [611 posts] 5 days ago
2 likes
AlanW wrote:
bechdan wrote:

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

There's  a bit of marketing and trade mark semantics involved, as Du Pont Teflon® = PTFE   but PTFE is not Teflon.  I actually designed the original TF2 spray 25 years ago along with quite a few other of their products -- ICI's (as was) version of PTFE was called Fluon so we could have used that instead but everyone knew Teflon so we stuck with that and also gained the rights to use the Du Pont trademark. GT85 and WD40 can say they contain PTFE but they can't use the word Teflon unless it is indeed Du Pont Teflon. That's why they only say 'PTFE'.

BTW PTFE powder is all but insoluble so if anyone wanted to mix their own with eg a synthetic oil, eventually the PTFE will drop out and fall to the bottom. It likely won't distribute uniformly throughout a bottle of oil. I did some trials of this at the time and they weren't very successful.

-- Alan W

Thats very interesting, I love reading things like this from people who have been involved with the development of something, so much more interesting than the usual marketing crap or second hand information passed on by people pretending that they know what they are talking about.  Thanks for posting that Alan 

Avatar
hawkinspeter [3284 posts] 5 days ago
0 likes
AlanW wrote:
bechdan wrote:

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

There's  a bit of marketing and trade mark semantics involved, as Du Pont Teflon® = PTFE   but PTFE is not Teflon.  I actually designed the original TF2 spray 25 years ago along with quite a few other of their products -- ICI's (as was) version of PTFE was called Fluon so we could have used that instead but everyone knew Teflon so we stuck with that and also gained the rights to use the Du Pont trademark. GT85 and WD40 can say they contain PTFE but they can't use the word Teflon unless it is indeed Du Pont Teflon. That's why they only say 'PTFE'.

BTW PTFE powder is all but insoluble so if anyone wanted to mix their own with eg a synthetic oil, eventually the PTFE will drop out and fall to the bottom. It likely won't distribute uniformly throughout a bottle of oil. I did some trials of this at the time and they weren't very successful.

-- Alan W

At one point I had the idea to mix paraffin wax with PTFE and graphite, but the PTFE didn't turn up from some chinese eBay seller so I just went with the graphite. I wonder if it would have worked well.

Avatar
AlanW [3 posts] 5 days ago
1 like

If anyone's interested in how TF2 originally evolved, I wrote a blog about it a few years ago. Also there's a pic of the very first aerosol can design that I originally signed off.   I'm more involved with other sectors nowadays but my original write-up on TF2 can be found here.  I also added some interesting aerosol snippets of info at the end enlightened

-- Alan W

Avatar
AlanW [3 posts] 5 days ago
0 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
AlanW wrote:
bechdan wrote:

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

[...]

BTW PTFE powder is all but insoluble so if anyone wanted to mix their own with eg a synthetic oil, eventually the PTFE will drop out and fall to the bottom. It likely won't distribute uniformly throughout a bottle of oil. I did some trials of this at the time and they weren't very successful.

-- Alan W

At one point I had the idea to mix paraffin wax with PTFE and graphite, but the PTFE didn't turn up from some chinese eBay seller so I just went with the graphite. I wonder if it would have worked well.

The problem was how to get a uniform blend of product. It isn't like PTFE dissolves into grease, you just end up with a brown grease containing lots of irregular white specks. In oil it was worse, it separated out over time. I did actually try mixing PTFE powder with grease and we did a short run of Teflon grease (whatever) but it wasn't a very good product really and it wasn't homogenous. PTFE was also incredibly expensive.

Avatar
hawkinspeter [3284 posts] 5 days ago
0 likes
AlanW wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:
AlanW wrote:
bechdan wrote:

why compare it to wd40 rather than GT85, thats got teflon in it too?

[...]

BTW PTFE powder is all but insoluble so if anyone wanted to mix their own with eg a synthetic oil, eventually the PTFE will drop out and fall to the bottom. It likely won't distribute uniformly throughout a bottle of oil. I did some trials of this at the time and they weren't very successful.

-- Alan W

At one point I had the idea to mix paraffin wax with PTFE and graphite, but the PTFE didn't turn up from some chinese eBay seller so I just went with the graphite. I wonder if it would have worked well.

The problem was how to get a uniform blend of product. It isn't like PTFE dissolves into grease, you just end up with a brown grease containing lots of irregular white specks. In oil it was worse, it separated out over time. I did actually try mixing PTFE powder with grease and we did a short run of Teflon grease (whatever) but it wasn't a very good product really and it wasn't homogenous. PTFE was also incredibly expensive.

That sounds like it might have worked a bit with wax as long as you keep the hot wax and powder mixed whilst immersing the chain.

PTFE is cheap enough on eBay (50-100g for around a tenner) but I have no idea if it's a quality product or not.

Avatar
Argus Tuft [7 posts] 4 days ago
2 likes

First post for me - Finally something I know a little about. It's not too hard to copy some of the commercial brands(Say R&R Gold for example).Evaporate the solvent and weigh what's left to establish a wax/solvent ratio. Hawkinspeter is dead right. PFTE is a bugger to use-it forms small clumps that are hard to break up.Smear it around a glass plate with some grease using a spatula,then dissolve in the wax/shellite solution.Even with the bought stuff the PFTE settles out -shake before use!

Best method so far is to make up "Candles" of Wax/grease/moly/etc. Using a shield between the chain and wheel,warm the lower run of the chain with a heat gun and apply the lube stick . It's drawn deep into the links and displaces any dirty stuff that's left. Cleaning (after initial clean) isn't required.     

Don't use too much grease or it'll attract dirt. Lube needs to be more waxy than greasy.

An application lasts a couple of hundred ks depending on type of solid lubricant used.Plain old wax/grease mix works nearly as well.

Be patient mixing wax and grease.Use a double boiler on an electric hotplate.Wax melts easily.Grease has a high melting point.Use a whisk and great care!