Support road.cc

Like this site? Help us to make it better.

news

Three quarters of Brits want drivers to retake their driving test; Alexandar Richardson smashes London to Brighton (and back) at 40km/h solo; Burgos organiser blames RIDER for crash; Fly tipper caught thanks to cyclist's camera + more on the live blog

It's another sunny Friday and Dan Alexander is in the house for one final live blog this week before we all disappear off into the weekend...
05 August 2022, 15:30
Three quarters of Brits want drivers to retake their driving test
London cyclist in traffic (picture copyright Simon MacMichael).PNG

Almost three quarters (74 per cent) of Brits believe you should have to retake your driving test, with two thirds (66 per cent) saying this should happen before drivers turn 80. That's according to research from personal finance comparison site finder.com.

There is currently no law that drivers must retake their test when they reach a certain age, although 74 per cent said there should. 10 per cent suggested this should happen before drivers reach 55 years old. Laws apply to drivers who have been disqualified or have certain medical conditions, but the research suggested only 18 per cent of Brits agree with the current regulations and think drivers should never retake their test at a set age.

In the age-specific breakdown, Gen Z (18-25 year olds) said 65 years old was the right age to retake a driving test, while those aged 74 and above said 76 years old would be an appropriate age.

Thoughts?

05 August 2022, 14:59
Want to host bike races? Sort your potholes out then

Editor Jack, having watched the Commonwealth Games TT visit his local roads, might baulk at the suggestion bike races only visit areas with good road surfaces...BUT Derby City Council is in the market for hosting a bike race, with the Tour Series, Women's Tour and Tour of Britain on their radar, reports the Derby Telegraph.

However, concerns have been raised about whether the streets are "smooth" enough to host such events. With the Conservative council ready to approve a bid, Lib Dem councillor Lucy Care asked: "My question is about the renewal of roads to ensure they'll be smooth enough to be ridden on at speed because some of our roads at the moment are not as good as they might be. Is there going to be an additional budget provided or do we have to find it ourselves to ensure the race roads are to a very good standard?"

Before calling the state of their roads "dubious", aren't they all, Lucy, aren't they all...

05 August 2022, 13:40
"It would be an achievement to average that speed on that route in a car, let alone a bike... astonishing": We're all in awe of Alexandar Richardson's speedy seaside smash

Of course, I'm sure that local legend is his proudest achievement from this one...

Under the live blog comments, PRSboy suggested it would be a decent average speed in a car, let alone on a bike, given the built-up nature of the route (and avoiding the M23/A23).

peted76 added: "London to Brighton and back at 25mph..  the more I think about it, the more impressive it gets. Chapeau sir!"

Secret_squirrel replied: "Doubly amusing to me as the First London to Brighton car rally had the cars limited to a top speed of 14mph."

Over on Facebook, Mikael Rasmussen commented: "Yeah OK .. now try that from Central London. rather than somewhere south of the South Circular 😉" We'll assume that's tongue in cheek, but I'm sure Alex could arrange a two-up TT to the south coast if you think you've got 41km/h in you, Mikael...

Seymour Yang commented: "At first I was like, L2B in four hours doesn’t sound impressive, then I saw that it was L2B and back again. Wow!"

05 August 2022, 07:46
Alexandar Richardson smashes London to Brighton (and back) at 40km/h solo

Chances are if you live somewhere in and around London or the the South East, you've had a big day out on the bike down to Brighton and back. It's a popular weekend route for riders in and around the M25 — you'll normally clock up close to 100 miles, and have a photo-worthy halfway stop by the coast with the added lure of ice cream or fish and chips...

Or, if your name is Alexandar Richardson, you can smash there and back in four hours at a quad-burning average speed of 40.5km/h... solo.

 

 To be fair Richardson isn't your usual club rider spinning the legs at the weekend, he was third at British National Champs behind that guy from Quick-Step whose name escapes me...

Mark Cavendish wins 2022 British road race championships (Alex Whitehead/SWpix.com)

Taking in a berg under 2,000m of elevation, the Saint Piran pro, who spent the last couple of seasons with Alpecin-Fenix, hit a top speed of 78km/h descending the South Downs on his way home and maintained a metronomic 91 cadence.

Brutally, the wind from the north meant a less-than-ideal tailwind out, headwind home, but he still managed to take six KOMs on the way out and a few top 10s back into the headwind.

Top of the KOM list? The 20km 'London to Brighton fast section' covered by thousands of riders at the annual charity ride (with the benefit of drafting and closed roads), which Richardson ticked off at 45.5km/h...as you do...

05 August 2022, 13:25
Which of these four WorldTour bikes is your favourite?

QuizMaker

05 August 2022, 11:24
Burgos organiser blames RIDER for sprint crash
Burgos crash (GCN/Eurosport)

Okay I think I've tracked it down...

Speaking to L'Équipe the race organiser Marcus Moral (dubbed Marcus Immoral by some clever people on Twitter) denied the speed bump was a speed bump...

"It was not a speed bump, but a zebra crossing no more than 2.5 centimeters high. On a slope," he said. "This obstacle was indicated by markings on the ground and by a signalman's flag. In preparation we showed the last three kilometers to the riders. It is impossible to find a track by removing roundabouts or passages like this one."

Brace yourselves... "It is a mistake by David Dekker," he continued.

Burgos crash (GCN/Eurosport)

"He has since realised this and has asked for forgiveness. I do now. I'm not saying it's just the rider's fault. It's everyone's fault. But we cannot attack the race organisation if the obstacle is indicated. I think the last kilometers of the second stage were correct. We take our responsibility, but people should not demonise us for that."

05 August 2022, 11:17
UPDATE: USA Cycling says Leia Genis was ineligible to race in the Elite Women’s category as she "had not completed the required steps to meet the UCI's Athlete Eligibility Regulations"
05 August 2022, 11:02
Vuelta a Burgos organiser blames THE RIDERS for huge sprint pile-up

This from Jos van Emden, teammate of Jumbo-Visma sprinter David Dekker, who was brought down by the speed bump on stage two's run-in, causing a terrible crash...

> "Disgrace": Pro riders rip into UCI over "unacceptable" speed bump sprint crash

We haven't yet seen any comments from the race director, so have to rely on Van Emden's word for the accusations. We'll see what we can find...

05 August 2022, 10:26
Count the cyclists
05 August 2022, 10:19
Fly tipper caught thanks to cyclist's camera

The Dorset Echo reports a man has received a hefty fine after a cyclist's camera footage proved he had illegally dumped stones and gravel on a roadside verge in Dorchester.

Richard Dunn appeared at Poole Magistrates Court after a rider's handlebar-mounted camera caught the act, with the cyclist reporting the footage to Dorset Council along with a statement.

The cyclist asked "That's not being fly tipped, is it mate?", to which Dunn replied "It's stones" before driving away. Last May he was issued a Fixed Penalty Notice of between £200 and £400 (depending on how promptly it was paid), but this was not paid.

Dunn was subsequently arrested and pleaded guilty to violating Section 33 (1)(a) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. He was sentenced to pay £479, including £150 fine, costs of £300 and £29 compensation.

05 August 2022, 09:40
All of us seeing Alexandar Richardson's Strava activity...
05 August 2022, 09:20
Surrey traffic cops add Brompton folder to force fleet

The Surrey Roads Policing Unit, known for its social media schoolings of ignorant road users, has managed to go up even further in our estimation after revealing it has added a Brompton folder to the fleet of crime-fighting vehicles.

> Surrey traffic cops tell driver spouting Highway Code whataboutery to return licence

Apparently "many people" in the Surrey town were pleased to see the "bobby on a Brommy" and ITV reports the force will also launch a road crime reduction team this autumn with the aim of reducing "the number of people killed and seriously injured on Surrey's roads by targeting and reducing road crime", specifically by reducing the so-called 'Fatal 5' — inappropriate speed, not wearing a seatbelt; driving under the influence of drink or drugs; distracted driving, such as using a mobile phone behind the wheel; careless driving.

Dan is the road.cc news editor and has spent the past four years writing stories and features, as well as (hopefully) keeping you entertained on the live blog. Having previously written about nearly every other sport under the sun for the Express, and the weird and wonderful world of non-league football for the Non-League Paper, Dan joined road.cc in 2020. Come the weekend you'll find him labouring up a hill, probably with a mouth full of jelly babies, or making a bonk-induced trip to a south of England petrol station... in search of more jelly babies.

Add new comment

80 comments

Avatar
Hirsute | 1 year ago
4 likes

Hopefully this will be a news item on Monday.

https://twitter.com/MatBurnham/status/1556228868201218049

//pbs.twimg.com/media/FZjVSYEXgAEYfQT?format=png&name=small)

 

 

 

"So if I’m turning left or right and someone is crossing the road where I want to turn. I can just hit them because they put themselves in harms way, as long as I look like I’m not trying to hit them! Cool"

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Hirsute | 1 year ago
1 like

hirsute wrote:

Hopefully this will be a news item on Monday.

https://twitter.com/MatBurnham/status/1556228868201218049

//pbs.twimg.com/media/FZjVSYEXgAEYfQT?format=png&name=small)

"So if I’m turning left or right and someone is crossing the road where I want to turn. I can just hit them because they put themselves in harms way, as long as I look like I’m not trying to hit them! Cool"

That's almost the definition of not doing their job. Matt Morris of Northants police should be sacked for that.

Avatar
Secret_squirrel replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
0 likes

Hmm I don't disagree about the shoddy statements from the police but I'd like to see a longer video before making a call as to whether this is one sided or not.  From the start of the video on twitter it's not clear how the OP got into conflict with the driver in the first place. 

Avatar
Hirsute replied to Secret_squirrel | 1 year ago
1 like

Aggressive use of the horn.

How is using your 2.5T vehicle as a weapon a proportionate response even if it were one sided (although what would amount to being one sided ?)

 

edit: as per the twitter thread this one sided argument lead to a dangerous driving charge

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/insulate-britain-range-rover...

Avatar
HoarseMann replied to Hirsute | 1 year ago
1 like

hirsute wrote:

Aggressive use of the horn.

It does seem inappropriate. I think it's perfectly reasonable to ask the driver why they beeped their horn if there's no obvious imminent danger. Could be they've noticed your QR is loose.

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Secret_squirrel | 1 year ago
2 likes

Secret_squirrel wrote:

Hmm I don't disagree about the shoddy statements from the police but I'd like to see a longer video before making a call as to whether this is one sided or not.  From the start of the video on twitter it's not clear how the OP got into conflict with the driver in the first place. 

I'd usually agree, but the officer admits that it was assault. Even if someone deliberately lies down in the middle of a busy junction, no right-minded individual is then going to ride/drive over them without expecting consequences.

The message that Matt Morris and his sergeant are sending is that it is acceptable to assault people who are obstructing your forward progress. I think that's incorrect and morally wrong.

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
0 likes

Let's see the video.  However it sounds like PC Morris is grasping a potential improvement on mere victim-blaming to avoid work.  He's got the logic to use the cyclist's evidence to do them for e.g. obstructing the highway or threat of criminal damage to the car's paintwork.  I see him going far.

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to chrisonabike | 1 year ago
3 likes

The video is on the Twitter link. Basically, the cyclist didn't move quickly enough in a traffic jam for the Range Rover so got hooted (against HC 112 "Use only while your vehicle is moving and you need to warn other road users of your presence. Never sound your horn aggressively."), turned his bike at an angle to look round and remonstrate with the driver, after some to and fro the driver attempts to drive round him but smashes into the front wheel. Antis (and the police, it seems) are clearly going to say he shouldn't have stopped, not sure how that justifies being driven into. Also not sure how the police can write "there is an assault" and then follow that by saying they're doing nothing. The police's job is to investigate and charge assaults, if they admit there's an assault it should be charged, deciding on mitigating circumstances is the job of CPS and/or the courts, not the cops.

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to Rendel Harris | 1 year ago
2 likes

Thanks.  I think I can see how this one will go now - "you could have just cycled onward and sent footage later.  Instead you were blocking the driver - you moved the bike towards their car - while confronting them.  They could have felt threatened by you.  They made an attempt to move away from the confrontation and tried to avoid you and merely clipped the front of your bike. If they'd meant to hit you they could have driven straight forward".  Probably toss in a "man vs. woman" / "but the cyclist could have moved over into the gutter / onto the pavement before having a debate or to let them through" / "rather be safe than right" etc.

Of course you could also argue that the motorist shouldn't have honked, the cyclist was clearly not threatening them (they're behind the bike and make no attempt to move towards the driver after "establishing themselves") and this was careless driving at the least as the driver could clearly see them, made a choice to drive forward and still hit them.

So this won't go anywhere and we'll have the usual suspects out in force on here.

Avatar
Hirsute replied to chrisonabike | 1 year ago
4 likes

Chief constable has just tweeted he is on to it.

I was bit worried they'd outdo lancs !

Avatar
wtjs replied to Hirsute | 1 year ago
0 likes

I was bit worried they'd outdo lancs !

I appreciate that my public is expecting me to rubbish this possibility- the responses from PC 856 are poor, but Lancashire has really upped their 'cyclists are the rats of the road' game and simply refuse to respond to anything sent to the abysmal OpSnapLancs. It is difficult for outsiders to appreciate just how thick these traffic officers are- in the days when responses were issued they were clearly not up to working out what a headcam is. They persist in referring to all cameras as 'dashcams' despite all my reports describing a 'headcam'. I try to leave in sections of me looking right down at the cassette for gear ascertainment but despite that they invariably interpret me looking right, when the psycho Sainsbury's or Stagecoach driver 'cuts me up a treat', as me swerving to the right. It's not a difficult concept, but they just can't grasp it.

What your Chief Constable is 'on to' is confirming to the officers concerned 'keep it up lads, and I'll talk my way out of it with the usual'. This is black Transit MC18 EHR cutting me up a treat at speed and avoiding collision with oncoming larger white Transit by pulling over much closer to me, but still earning a well-deserved blast of the horn from the other Transit. There will be no response from OpSnapLancs and I'm now in the 5th week of waiting for a reply from Lancashire PCC over the complete failure of OSL to respond or act. When it comes it's likely to be really stupid.

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to Hirsute | 1 year ago
1 like

hirsute wrote:

Chief constable has just tweeted he is on to it. I was bit worried they'd outdo lancs !

Oh!  Let's see then.  I still think the most that'll happen is a statement like "I'm sorry an officer misspoke somewhat; now, as you were".

This is "failing a driving test"-level driving on at least one and likely more counts.  Sadly I can see far too many "outs".  I doubt it'd even get to court and (although it's a lottery) I'd bet on it failing for most charges should it do so.  A civil action over bike repair costs might be a winner though.  Can you recoup punitive damages on assault via the civil route?

Avatar
NOtotheEU replied to Hirsute | 1 year ago
4 likes

I've watched the video and they clearly 'placed themselves in harms way'. The entitled cyclist was actually in the road!

As I was told by a defence witness in Magistrates Court last week, I shouldn't have wobbled away from a stop, gone slowly uphill or even been in the road when a perfectly good pavement was there.

If only there was some code for users of the highway that everyone could follow then cyclists wouldn't keep stupidly and dangerously getting in the way.

Avatar
IanMSpencer | 1 year ago
4 likes

Mandatory retests - not sure, but I would be quite happy that anyone clocking up more than 2 driving offences must retest within a year or lose their licence and a 12 point is mandatory ban, though any exceptional circumstances could have a licence reinstated by retaking a test - possibly an extended test depending on the nature of offences.

Avatar
Car Delenda Est | 1 year ago
1 like

Mandatory theory retest every 5-10 years, seems fairly obvious.

Avatar
lonpfrb replied to Car Delenda Est | 1 year ago
1 like
Car Delenda Est wrote:

Mandatory theory retest every 5-10 years, seems fairly obvious.

The statistically safest transport mode, Aviation, has a safety first mentality including Fitness for Type, and Currency.

Fitness for Type means that in addition to the foundation of license for each level of conditions; visual flight , night flight, instrument meteorological conditions, multi-engines, etc. the pilot is fully trained on the specific type of aircraft e.g. 757-200 so fully aware of all peculiarities required for safe operation.

Currency means that the pilot has been flying recently enough to be sharp on all the practical skills and specific knowledge. So not: I used to, but not so much now...

So all of this is safety best practice justified by the low appetite for risk that is the consensus between manufacturers, operators, passengers and regulators.

I suppose, what is our risk appetite for road transport and is the regulation effective to deliver it?

Avatar
espressodan | 1 year ago
2 likes

I'm not sure any of us would love a retest, but it's a real anomaly that in this world where so many risks are managed to the nth degree, these this activity that causes more harm than most of the others on a per-capita basis with absolutely no ongoing competence management or assessment requirement from initial qualification.

I don't think that retesting is really the answer, but some sort of regular refresher requirement for continued licencing (like the 'driver awareness' course that people receive after an offence) would be pretty simple to implement and manageable through existing DVLA systems. Just make sure it's free!

Avatar
Shaun TheDiver | 1 year ago
2 likes

I don't think there should be a 5 year practical retest until you hit your 60s, however there's no reason not to have a 5 yearly online theory, awareness, and hazard perception test at all ages.

Avatar
Patrick9-32 | 1 year ago
6 likes

Mandatory retests every 5 years would be incredibly unpopular with drivers but realistically every driver on the road should be at a standard far higher than the driving test standard so a test shouldn't be a problem.

The day you are worst at driving should be the day you pass your test, if after 5 years of driving you couldn't sail through the test with no minor faults then you should be doing additional training, if after that your bad habits are so ingrained you can't shake them then you shouldnt be driving.

It would save hundreds of lives and it would cost drivers almost nothing (around 4p and 2 seconds per day if you average the £69 and one hour over 5 years).

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Patrick9-32 | 1 year ago
6 likes

Patrick9-32 wrote:

Mandatory retests every 5 years would be incredibly unpopular with drivers but realistically every driver on the road should be at a standard far higher than the driving test standard so a test shouldn't be a problem.

The day you are worst at driving should be the day you pass your test, if after 5 years of driving you couldn't sail through the test with no minor faults then you should be doing additional training, if after that your bad habits are so ingrained you can't shake them then you shouldnt be driving.

It would save hundreds of lives and it would cost drivers almost nothing (around 4p and 2 seconds per day if you average the £69 and one hour over 5 years).

I used to think that mandatory retests would be a good idea, but I've got my doubts now. Some of the poor driving behaviour is entirely optional (e.g. mobile phone use; speeding; MGIF; close-passing) so a retest wouldn't catch those issues. I prefer the idea of better road policing, whether that's actual police, increased dashcam usage or automated driving evaluation (e.g. black boxes).

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
4 likes

Interesting. I agree it's certainly not a guarantee of or quick fix for safety.  And we could definitely do with (much) more immediate feedback e.g. enforcement, however delivered.  I would like to see something in the way of retest / skills refresher however to:

  • Demonstrate this is indeed a regulated activity (hence you're tested and licenced), not like a society you have to get into but then you're there for life.
  • Provide a means of updating people's knowledge and skills.  Rules, practices and even vehicles and infra change.
  • Pick up some reasonably common things like "this person has now gone mostly blind" or other issues which would prevent you from driving safely but which people might not have not reported themselves.
Avatar
chrisonabike replied to chrisonabike | 1 year ago
2 likes

I do appreciate that all tests (and indeed black box monitoring) can be circumvented and indeed that may set up a market for "getting past".  Reminds me of Withnail and I too:

https://y.yarn.co/8c95981d-f4c7-4210-994d-76292d661a0b.mp4

Avatar
mdavidford replied to chrisonabike | 1 year ago
5 likes

And it's not an either /or - doing periodic retesting doesn't somehow preclude also improving / increasing policing and enforcement.

Avatar
Rik Mayals unde... replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
5 likes

I agree. I see some ridiculously bad drivers, many are youngsters who must have only just passed their tests, so theoretically should be among the best drivers on the road. One lad wrote his car off up the road and killed a passenger a few years ago. He was speeding, on his phone, and had passed his driving test three weeks previously.

Most bad driving is sheer lazy driving. Not helped by modern cars being so easy to drive with so many distractions inside.

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Rik Mayals underpants | 1 year ago
2 likes

biker phil wrote:

I agree. I see some ridiculously bad drivers, many are youngsters who must have only just passed their tests, so theoretically should be among the best drivers on the road. One lad wrote his car off up the road and killed a passenger a few years ago. He was speeding, on his phone, and had passed his driving test three weeks previously.

Most bad driving is sheer lazy driving. Not helped by modern cars being so easy to drive with so many distractions inside.

The driving test should be considered the minimum standard - you pass the test and then gain experience and learn from it, but that doesn't seem to apply to a lot of drivers. Certainly, younger drivers have far worse insurance rates due to their inexperience and lack of judgement.

Avatar
lonpfrb replied to Rik Mayals underpants | 1 year ago
2 likes
biker phil wrote:

I agree. I see some ridiculously bad drivers, many are youngsters who must have only just passed their tests, so theoretically should be among the best drivers on the road.

Where is the data to prove that there is an issue and that this survey 'common sense' is not just ageist nonsense?

100% of motor vehicle drivers are expected to be aware of their fitness to drive whether related to vision, reaction, DVLA notifiable medical conditions, alcohol or medicine side effects.

Similarly, responsible for checking the vehicle fitness for purpose before driving, yet how many do?

Not many if the number of defective lights I see are a fair guide...

PS: fog lights in fine weather seems an indication of people who either don't know what all the vehicle controls do or haven't checked the lights before moving off. Either way, incompetence.

Avatar
Shelders replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
2 likes

I agree with this but would also like to see more co-ordinated adverts like drink driving or seat belt wearing campaigns of yester-year for mobile phone use at the wheel and drug driving, which now seems to be really on the rise.

However, they would need to be properly researched and organised so we don't get the Twitter style, #cyclelikeyoudrive nonsense. I can't believe it would be too difficult to get these signed off by all concerned, including the likes of Chris Boardman and markandcharlie etc 

Avatar
lonpfrb replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
1 like
hawkinspeter wrote:

I used to think that mandatory retests would be a good idea, but I've got my doubts now. Some of the poor driving behaviour is entirely optional (e.g. mobile phone use; speeding; MGIF; close-passing) so a retest wouldn't catch those issues. I prefer the idea of better road policing, whether that's actual police, increased dashcam usage or automated driving evaluation (e.g. black boxes).

The sooner we get the wetware out of the loop, and software in control, the safer we will be.

The default corporate liability will provide a strong push to safety that isn't there with plausible deniability that manufactures have now.

'It's not a dangerous product, rather people...'

Avatar
NOtotheEU replied to Patrick9-32 | 1 year ago
7 likes

Couldn't agree more.

My employer has to re-test all of us on any of the 6 different pieces of equipment we have licences for every 3 years to comply with the insurance policy and all of them are limited to 10mph.

There must be some tangible benefit.

EDIT: I forgot the yearly medical and eyesight test too, no idea if it's insurance related though.

 

Avatar
BIRMINGHAMisaDUMP replied to NOtotheEU | 1 year ago
2 likes

'There must be some tangible benefit' 

still non found. Mogg did mention something about Hoovers though. 

Pages

Latest Comments