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“Is Tom Pidcock wasting his talent and time racing off-road?” asks former Vuelta winner – after British star dominates mountain bike races a week before Tour de France starts; Snow on the Galibier a week before the Tour arrives + more on the live blog

It’s Tuesday, there’s snow on the Galibier, and Ryan Mallon’s back with more cycling news, views, and nonsense on the live blog

SUMMARY

25 June 2024, 08:07
Tom Pidcock, 2024 Strade Bianche (Zac Williams/SWpix.com)
“Is Tom Pidcock wasting his talent and time racing off-road?” asks former Vuelta winner – after British star dominates mountain bike races a week before Tour de France starts

As we all know by now, the last few years in professional cycling, thanks to the varied exploits of Marianne Vos, Wout van Aert, Fem van Empel, and Mathieu van der Poel, have witnessed the rise of the multidisciplinary star.

That trend was never more apparent than at the weekend, when Tom Pidcock – Olympic mountain bike gold medallist, former cyclocross world champion, and Alpe d’Huez conqueror – rocked up to the UCI MTB World Series in Crans-Montana, just a week before he will line up in Florence for the start of the Tour de France.

And not only did Pidcock swap the road and time trial bike for some knobbly tyres in Switzerland, he also put in two imperious, crushing displays – overcoming a mechanical and early crash to rip through the field and go from dead last to first on Saturday’s short-track event, before dominating the cross-country race the following day, beating Switzerland’s Mathias Fluckiger by over a minute, in an ominous showing ahead of title defence at the Paris Olympics.

Very impressive.

One retired racer who wasn’t as impressed with the 24-year-old Ineos rider’s off-road exploits was Chris Horner, the former Astana, Lotto, and RadioShack pro whose 2013 Vuelta a España win over Vincenzo Nibali at the age of 41 still ranks as one of the more, ahem, surprising grand tour triumphs in recent memory.

[The road.cc legal team have informed me that I’m not allowed to say anything else about the 2013 Vuelta…]

But anyway, Horner took to his YouTube channel – like any American pro of the noughties tends to do – to question Pidcock’s decision to race his mountain bike so close to the Tour, asking whether he was “wasting his talent” by devoting so much time to the off-road side of the sport.

“I’m thinking dumbfoundedly, why would he be at the short-track mountain bike event in Switzerland?” Horner asked. “Why would he be racing there, instead of recovering fully after the Tour de Suisse, followed by training and then recovery before the Tour de France in one week’s time?

“To place it into perspective, Tom Pidcock has won five races in four seasons,” Horner continues.

Of course, Chris, those wins do include an Amstel Gold, Strade Bianche, and a Tour de France stage victory atop Alpe d’Huez. Sure, they’re no Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah or Tour of Langkawi stage win, but not too shabby, I’m sure you’d agree.

“He has some fantastic wins, no doubt about it,” the former RadioShack rider concurred. “And he finished sixth overall the Tour de Suisse, and had a great final time trial. So he’s starting to show he can do great time trials too.”

Vuelta 2013 Stage 18 Chris Horner (© Unipublic:Graham Watson)

Horner on the way to his 2013 Vuelta win (Unipublic/Graham Watson)

But then Horner explained that the window to recover and train for the Tour de France following the Tour de Suisse is small – compared to the Dauphiné, which ends the week before – and that Pidcock’s weekend spent racing his mountain bike at Crans-Montana was eating into that “precious” pre-Tour recovery time.

“You’re like ‘Chris, he won’, but I still wonder whether the sponsors, team Ineos, Pidcock himself – are they really wasting his effort?” the 52-year-old asked.

“In past interviews, he said he gets bored as a domestique at the Tour, he wants to be aggressive, he wants to be attacking. And I assume cyclocross and mountain biking is more exciting than a flat day at the Tour, but you’re winning against a bunch of riders who aren’t paid very much salary, they’re not really professional, I bet half the field has a side job during the winter.

Tom Pidcock, Dublin UCI Cyclocross World Cup 2022 (Alex Whitehead/SWpix.com)

(Alex Whitehead/SWpix.com)

“So when you’re winning over there, instead of at the Tour de France, I think you’re being wasted. I think Tom Pidcock is wasting his time.

“It may be good for the sponsors, but when I’m watching him win a 20-minute event a week before the Tour, I’m seeing a young rider, with his victories he has and the ability he has to be able to follow Tadej Pogačar or Remco Evenepoel, or finish high on GC at the Tour de Suisse – what I really see is a wasted two-week period before the Tour.

“And I see a rider, who can go top 10 in all these events, and he’s getting ready to start the Tour de France… And instead he’s on the mountain bike, it’s ridiculous.”

However, despite Horner’s pure roadie claims of wasted talent, his YouTube comments section was brimming with support for Pidcock mixing it up and enjoying racing his bike.

“Completely disagree,” said Axel. “What worked for Chris in his career, in his time, with his style of training, with his priorities, worked for him. Pidcock is one of my favourite riders precisely because of his versatility and ability to win in different disciplines within cycling. His enjoyment and success stems from doing just that.

“Matter of fact, his mountain bike skills are arguably the reason why he even has a TDF stage win at all, as MTB descending gives you so much confidence once you step on a road bike and launch yourself down Alpe d’Huez at inhuman speeds.”

2021 tom pidcock gold medal team gb great britain mountain bike tokyo 2020 olympics

(Alex Broadway/SWpix.com)

“We’re all not road snobs. I really appreciate Pidcock elevating MTB racing. I’m sure his bike sponsor is happy and he’s well compensated. The TDF is not the end all be all to a lot of us bike fans,” said James.

“He’s at Crans-Montana because of the Olympics,” noted Andrew. “The more mountain bike World Cup points he has, the better his starting position in the Olympics. Given the rest of the World Cup mountain bikers aren’t road cyclists, they’re banking points week in week out, Pidcock has limited opportunities.

“Pinarello will be paying a big chunk of his wage and an Olympic gold medal, in general in the UK, is held in much higher regard than a TDF stage (Pinarello developed their MTB just for him and Pauline Ferrand-Prevot). A second gold, in the UK, would massively increase his worth and this will be his last big push. Once this Olympic cycle is done he’ll switch 100 per cent over to the road.”

However, some also agreed that 2024 would mark the end of Pidcock’s road, cyclocross, and MTB juggling act.

“I think this is the last acceptable year for this multitasking. He does have the Olympics this year and an Olympic gold is huge for Britain and I’m sure Pidcock feels the same. And as he’s still young he hasn’t missed out on any prime years yet,” wrote Enda.

“But for the next three years it would be honestly ridiculous for him not to hang up the mountain bike for the summer and target Grand Tours. With his punch, sprint, climbing, light weight, and technical skills he absolutely can win a Vuelta at the very least.”

Fair point. But still, if Pidcock adds another Olympic gold to his collection this summer, I doubt he’ll look back when he’s retired and view the early years of his career on the mountain bike as “wasted”…

25 June 2024, 12:23
Vuelta 2013 Stage 10 - Chris Horner back in red (© Unipublic:Graham Watson)
“No, he’s living his best life and loving what he does and WINNING”: Cycling fans not impressed with Chris Horner’s “wasted talent” take on Tom Pidcock

Well, the verdict’s back on Chris Horner’s claim that Tom Pidcock is “wasting his talent and time” by dividing his time between road, cyclocross, and mountain biking – and winning at all three, of course.

And let’s just say that not too many cycling fans agree with ol’ Hoa-noa (anyone who’s read ‘Lance Armstrong’s War’ by Daniel Coyle should immediately get that admittedly niche reference).

Tom Pidcock 2023 UCI World Championships (Alex Broadway/SWpix.com)

 (Alex Broadway/SWpix.com)

So, is Pidcock wasting his talent?

“Nope. Glad we could clear that up,” wrote journalism lecturer and cycling writer Vern Pitt on Twitter.

Expanding on Vern’s point, fellow cycling writer Simon Warren said: “No, he’s living his best life and loving what he does and WINNING”.

“Is the current World and Olympic champion wasting his talent doing something he clearly loves, but that certain dinosaurs don’t think is valuable?” asked Stine Momo.

“Is racing joy ever a waste? By what metric? If anything his talent for MTB may be greater than on the road. Is road racing a waste?”

“So he's complaining about Tom spending his weekend racing when he should be recovering, whilst most of the other riders going to the TdF have been racing their national championships?” added another Twitter user.

Good point…

Vuelta 2013 Stage 10 - Chris Horner wins (© Unipublic:Graham Watson)

(Unipublic:Graham Watson)

Meanwhile, over in the live blog comment section, Secret Squirrel said: “Pidders appears to be having as much fun as you can possibly have whilst still being a professional athlete and grinding out training. F*** the h8ers, hope he keeps doing him.

“(Fingers crossed for at least one Alaphilippe style blood and guts multi-day GC lead in his future though.)”

Now that would be something.

“Sounds very much like Chris Horner is projecting his preferences onto Tom Pidcock,” says MattieKempy. “How winning MTB XCO and XCC races in the same weekend, emphatically in both cases, can be called a waste of talent is beyond me! It would make a more convincing argument if he’d suggested that Pidcock was wasting his talent by messing about on the road!”

“I doubt Tom Pidcock will have any regrets over his palmares. Not many pro road riders have the handling skills and tactical nous to compete at the sharp end of other disciplines at such a high level,” added Matthew Acton-Varian.

Tom Pidcock, 2023 Tour of Britain (Alex Whitehead/SWpix.com)

(Alex Whitehead/SWpix.com)

However, there was one lone voice of dissent, howling out from the wilderness.

“Pidcock is 100 per cent leaving road success on the table by focusing on MTB,” says the contrarian EraserBike. “That’s fine if he wants to do MTB Olympics/CX but let’s not pretend that doing World Cup races a week before the Tour is ideal training for a road racer. Pogačar isn’t doing this, Jonas isn’t doing this, no other serious GC rider does this.

“I’m biased because I don’t care about off-road racing but I’d like to see what he can do with a properly focused road programme. Maybe we’ll see that after the Olympics.”

So, not quite an emphatic rejection of the oldest Vuelta winner’s controversial take, but close enough…

25 June 2024, 15:37
It’s that time of the year again… Get your DS caps on, the road.cc Fantasy League is open!

Now that most of the teams have announced their Tour de France squads, we can finally spend the next four days checking the form, picking, unpicking, deliberating, and doubting every decision we make, as we all prepare for the biggest competition of the year: the road.cc Tour Fantasy League!

Fantasy Cycling (Zac Williams/SWpix.com)

> Sign up for road.cc’s 2024 Tour de France Fantasy Cycling here

And your resident blogger is feeling the pressure to build upon his promising 10th place overall from last year’s Tour.

Now I know how Jonas, Tadej, and Remco feel this week…

25 June 2024, 10:56
Cycle lane dividers, New Zealand (LDS)
“That’s like removing the barbed wire from a fence because burglars kept hurting themselves”: Council criticised for removing bike lane separators that “inadvertently” made road more dangerous – because drivers kept hitting them

Just when you thought rows about light cycle lane segregation and motorists’ tendency to drive into the dividers was confined to the UK, think again.

Over in New Zealand, a local council has confirmed it is removing the separators from a cycle lane where the number of students cycling to school has rocketed since they were installed – because drivers kept hitting them.

The dividers were installed earlier this year on Salisbury Road in Richmond, in the far north of New Zealand’s South Island, leading to reports from local schools that bike racks are “full to overflowing” thanks to the new safer route for school, while feedback from council surveys suggests that the majority of residents believe that the road is safer now than before the separators were installed.

However, motorist have repeatedly hit the dividers, sending them into the cycle lane and creating hazards for those on bikes using it.

> Removal of safety wands and dividers from cycle lane will “make it safer for all road users”, claims council – but cyclists say plan is “vindictive and insane”

So what is the local council proposing to do about the shoddy state of the area’s drivers? Penalise cyclists by removing their protection, of course.

“The reason we put these in, which I voted for, was to keep cyclists safe,” said Councillor Glen Daikee, according to 1News. “We have inadvertently made it more dangerous. We cannot leave them.”

Meanwhile, the council also intends to reinstall two car parks that were removed to make way for the cycle lane, while the trial 30kph speed limit will be scrapped and the road returned to 50kph – because, the local authority says, drivers were failing to comply with the lowered limit due to a lack of speed bumps on the road.

I give up.

And so, apparently, do a host of local cyclists.

“Cars hitting the cycle lane separators show they are needed, not that they’re a hazard,” said Lachlan.

“That’s like removing the barbed wire from a fence because burglars kept hurting themselves.”

“‘Car drivers can’t drive’ should have been the headline,” added Kate. Quite…

25 June 2024, 14:47
What? Lighter than an SL8? Get out of town…

Wilier’s new all-rounder, the Verticale SLR, is a climber's dream with a brand new lightweight cockpit and frame (amounting to a 10 per cent weight reduction on its predecessor), and you’ll need at least £9,000 to own one.

And by our calculations, the frame, fork, and seatpost combined are a shade lighter than even Specialized’s flagship road bike, the SL8. Anyone want to lend me around £9,000?

WilierVerticaleAction-1395

> Wilier unveils its "lightest ever bike", the Verticale SLR... and it's (we think) even lighter than the Specialized Tarmac SL8

25 June 2024, 14:05
The Tour ‘special’ kits are here, as Alpecin-Deceuninck swap their double denim for… errr, grey double denim

Now, if you thought Alpecin- Deceuninck’s double denim kit was divisive – and that Mathieu van der Poel’s world championship win was merely a ploy to avoid resembling the cycling version of an ageing rocker at an AC/DC gig – then wait until you see their special kit for the Tour…

 Alpecin 'Grey Attack' 2024 Tour de France kit

 

Yep, grey double denim. Or, as Alpecin’s press release called it, a nasty attack of the greys (Okay, they actually said ‘grey attack’, but close enough).

And it gets better. The new dark grey look for the Tour was designed to promote sponsor Alpecin’s new Grey Attack shampoo, with its “natural-looking colour effect” to ward off grey hairs. Therefore, according to the team, the new Tour kit, and I quote, “symbolises the fight against one of the most visible signs of aging – grey hair”.

The presser continues: “The campaign tells a heroic story, that shows that it is worth fighting and never giving up – even in the battle against time.”

Mathieu van der Poel - Alpecin 'Grey Attack' 2024 Tour de France kit

Oh cycling, never stop being you.

Though no wonder MVDP looks suitably nonplussed. And I say that as a fan of the original double denim look…

25 June 2024, 12:48
Total cost of hosting Glasgow World Championships to exceed budget by 20% as reports claim Scottish Government spent £9 million to improve cycling facilities
Royal Mile, 2023 UCI Cycling World Championships, Men's Elite Road Race, Edinburgh to Glasgow, Scotland (Alex Broadway/SWpix.com)

The final figures for the total amount spent on the 2023 UCI World Championships held in Glasgow are expected to exceed the budget by almost 20% to reach a total of “at least £63 million”, with reports suggesting that the Scottish Government will have to pay a share of almost £40 million, exceeding the figure of £30 million it had initially committed for the event.

> Total cost of hosting Glasgow World Championships to exceed budget by 20% as reports claim Scottish Government spent £9 million to improve cycling facilities

25 June 2024, 10:23
And the award for best Tour de France team announcement goes to…

Now, this is how you do it. No weird AI-generated effects (looking at you, Visma). No weird, convoluted nods to the Renaissance (eh, that’s you again Visma).

Just a simple, touching video on what bike racing means to all of us…

And a lovely way to inform the public that Remco Evenepoel’s maiden yellow jersey tilt will be supported by Soudal Quick-Step teammates Jan Hirt, Mikel Landa, Gianni Moscon, Casper Pedersen, Ilan Van Wilder, Louis Vervaeke, and Yves Lampaert.

Also, shout out to the young racer in the video who said he wants to become the next Yves Lampaert – “but a little better”.

That kid will go far…

25 June 2024, 11:40
Designing cities for cars versus designing cities for active travel
25 June 2024, 11:18
Garmin releases shiny new bike computer with built-in speaker – and shorter battery life
25 June 2024, 09:54
Sepp Kuss Angliru 2023 Vuelta (Luis Angel Gomez/SprintCyclingAgency©2023/ASO)
Vuelta winner Sepp Kuss pulls out of Visma-Lease a Bike Tour de France squad due to Covid

More news involving American Vuelta a España winners this morning (and there are only two of them), as Visma-Lease a Bike announced this morning that Sepp Kuss has been withdrawn from their Tour de France squad after failing to recover sufficiently from the bout of Covid he contracted during the Critérium du Dauphiné.

The 29-year-old climber, who took a popular overall win at the Vuelta last season after years spent shepherding Jonas Vingegaard and Primož Roglič over mountains for the Dutch squad, is the second high-profile rider to fall victim to Covid and miss out on the Tour, after Tao Geoghegan Hart pulled out of Lidl-Trek’s team last week.

According to Visma-Lease a Bike this morning, Kuss withdrew on the penultimate day of this month’s Dauphiné, where he put in a surprisingly subdued performance and failed to stick with the best on the climbs, with mild Covid symptoms.

While the team thought he had recovered in time for the Tour, his illness returned in recent days, with his spot in the team now going to debutant Bart Lemmen.

Kuss’ absence is another bitter blow for a Visma-Lease a Bike team that has been plagued by bad luck and injuries this season, as doubts still hang over the form and fitness of reigning double Tour winner Jonas Vingegaard, with the Dane yet to race since his horror crash at the Tour of the Basque Country in April, while vital all-rounder Wout van Aert is also on the path to recovery after crashing heavily during the spring classics.

“This is of course very hard for Sepp in the first place. His contribution is always very important in the team, but then of course he has to be completely fit,” DS Merijn Zeeman said today.

“Unfortunately, we had to conclude together today that this is insufficiently the case, after Covid. He now needs to recover properly and will therefore not start. Fortunately, we have a good replacement ready with Bart Lemmen.”

25 June 2024, 09:08
“Think we’re going to need a bigger shovel”: Col du Galibier still covered in snow – exactly one week before the Tour de France peloton ascends the Alpine monster
Col du Galibier snow (Julien Dussuchale)

Believe it or not, this time next week the Tour de France peloton will be waking up in Pinerolo, after three tough and stressful days racing in Italy, and getting ready for the race’s first foray into the Alps.

Yes, that’s right, I haven’t just checked the wrong month on my calendar. Next Tuesday, the riders will ascend skywards to Sestriere (the scene of Armstrong, ’99, and all that), before crossing the border back into France via the Col de Montgenèvre, and finally taking on the 2,642m-high Col du Galibier, one of the Tour’s true giants, and a swift descent into the finish at Valloire.

A proper mountain stage. In a week’s time. I’m not ready.

And nor, it appears, is the Galibier itself, at least judging by these photos posted on social media this morning by Iain Cameron, Britain’s foremost authority on snow patches (so he knows what he’s talking about):

The snow clearing operation will be fun…

However, one commenter noted that the road, despite not being opened yet and surrounded by snowbanks, has nevertheless been cleared and passed for the Tour’s arrival next week. Phew.

Although some seemed to be wishing for some extra snow drama on the Galibier.

“They should leave it and make the riders carry their bikes over the snow, running. It would be epic,” added a rather sadistic James.

To be fair, hike-a-bike is all the rage these days…

25 June 2024, 09:35
“Apparently the road is too dangerous to police properly to protect vulnerable road users, but I’m sure they will attend to scrape you off the road when you’re hit by a motorist!”

In case you missed it last night, Police Scotland have said that they “don’t tend to” carry out cyclist close operations on A roads, due to safety concerns for their bike-riding officers, after one cyclist complained of consistently dangerous driving and frequent close passes on the A92 between Inverbervie and Montrose, which forms part of the National Cycle Network, ironically enough.

Close pass operation (Police Scotland Greater Glasgow)

Read more: > Police claim they don’t carry out close pass operations on A roads due to “safety element involved towards police cyclists” — after cyclist complains of dangerous driving and “20 closes passes in a day” on national cycle route

Ryan joined road.cc in December 2021 and since then has kept the site’s readers and listeners informed and enthralled (well at least occasionally) on news, the live blog, and the road.cc Podcast. After boarding a wrong bus at the world championships and ruining a good pair of jeans at the cyclocross, he now serves as road.cc’s senior news writer. Before his foray into cycling journalism, he wallowed in the equally pitiless world of academia, where he wrote a book about Victorian politics and droned on about cycling and bikes to classes of bored students (while taking every chance he could get to talk about cycling in print or on the radio). He can be found riding his bike very slowly around the narrow, scenic country lanes of Co. Down.

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41 comments

Avatar
mikewood | 3 weeks ago
1 like

Does the Alpecin kit get a shade darker every day until it's blacker than a black hole?

Avatar
ktache | 3 weeks ago
6 likes

Pidcock can do whatever he wants as long as he continues to descend like a madman and they show it on TV in the middle week.

Or at the weekend.

Avatar
flyingpitman | 3 weeks ago
0 likes

"  "Chris Horner, the former Astana, Lotto, and RadioShack pro whose 2013 Vuelta a España win over Vincenzo Nibali at the age of 41 still ranks as one of the more, ahem, surprising grand tour triumphs in recent memory." Nailed it,but I still believe in Father Christmas,and the Tooth Fairy.Did little jack Horner win anything else?? mind he didn't test positive,wonder where I heard that before  1  

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to flyingpitman | 3 weeks ago
1 like

flyingpitman wrote:

Did little jack Horner win anything else??

He had major wins at the Tour of the Basque Country and Tour of California, plus top tens in the Tour de France, World Championship Road Race, Tour de Suisse, Tour de Romandie, Dauphine and many Monuments and one-day classics. Nothing to say he wasn't, ahem, "assisted" in those as well, but he didn't exactly appear out of nowhere.

Avatar
Hirsute | 3 weeks ago
0 likes

2 cyclists hit by drunk driver near dallas airport

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVXoOHxOCjI

Contains distressing scenes.

Avatar
brooksby replied to Hirsute | 3 weeks ago
1 like

Hirsute wrote:

2 cyclists hit by drunk driver near dallas airport

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVXoOHxOCjI

Contains distressing scenes.

Wasn't that video on the live blog a couple of days ago?

Avatar
Hirsute replied to brooksby | 3 weeks ago
1 like

Sorry, I've been away. It just popped up on twitter for me.

Avatar
brooksby replied to Hirsute | 3 weeks ago
1 like

I hope you went somewhere you could ride your bike? yes

Avatar
Hirsute replied to brooksby | 3 weeks ago
0 likes

English Welsh border - it was very hilly and attritional, so we didnt cycle much. Did try a gravel ride but had to walk on some of the downhill for fear of coming off ! That bit was off road to me requiring a decent mtb. We used a bit of NCN 423 which was another overgrown, narrow cycle way.

Previous week we picked up a bit of NCN 45 but it was wider and less nettlely on the tow path !

Avatar
brooksby | 3 weeks ago
2 likes

Remind me - how aero is a snow plough? 

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EraserBike | 3 weeks ago
0 likes

I'll go ahead and be a dissenting opinion from the commenters here. Pidcock is 100% leaving road success on the table by focusing on MTB. That's fine if he wants to do MTB Olympics/CX but lets not pretend that doing world cup races a week before the tour is ideal training for a road racer. Pogacar isn't doing this, Jonas isn't doing this, no other serious GC rider does this. 

I'm biased because I don't care about off-road racing but I'd like to see what he can do with a properly focused road program. Maybe we'll see that after the Olympics.

Avatar
Patrick9-32 replied to EraserBike | 3 weeks ago
1 like

I would love to see what he could do with a properly focussed XC program rather than wasting all that fitness on multi day races.

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mdavidford replied to Patrick9-32 | 3 weeks ago
0 likes

Never mind all that - he should be focussing on his Zwift racing.

Avatar
Patrick9-32 replied to mdavidford | 3 weeks ago
0 likes

Zwift, with its pure wattage being the only thing that matters is much closer to modern road cycle racing than most would like to admit...

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the little onion | 3 weeks ago
2 likes

As far as I'm concerned, there have been the same number of American Vuelta winners as there has been American Tour winners.

Avatar
mitsky | 3 weeks ago
4 likes

"London remains Europe's most congested city"

I actually laughed out loud when I red:
"As an indication of strong economic activity, increased congestion can be a positive sign for cities."

If only there was a cheap solution...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cz447jl05yno

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to mitsky | 3 weeks ago
1 like

And more casualties (from pollution, from crashes) means more work for someone (treating injuries or diseases, undertaking, clearing up roads, fixing holes in buildings, making new motor vehicles)!

Avatar
mdavidford | 3 weeks ago
2 likes

Is Wout van Aert's head really three times the size of any of his teammates'?

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to mdavidford | 3 weeks ago
10 likes

mdavidford wrote:

Is Wout van Aert's head really three times the size of any of his teammates'?

Wouldn't yours be, if you were Wout van Aert?

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to mdavidford | 3 weeks ago
0 likes
Avatar
mdavidford replied to chrisonabike | 3 weeks ago
1 like

Touché!

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Secret_squirrel | 3 weeks ago
9 likes

Pidders appears to be having as much fun as you can possibly have whilst still being a professional athlete and grinding out training. 
Fuck the h8ers hope he keeps doing him. 
 

(Fingers crossed for at least one Alaphillipe style blood and guts multi-day GC lead in his future though.)

Avatar
Nick T | 3 weeks ago
10 likes

"I bet half the field has a side job during the winter"

I always assumed Pidcock's side job to fund his MTB career was road racing

Avatar
ubercurmudgeon | 3 weeks ago
8 likes

Chris Horner is a blowhard and a clickbait merchant. That is all.

Avatar
Brauchsel replied to ubercurmudgeon | 3 weeks ago
7 likes

I don't know, the former RadioShack rider and surprise winner of a Grand Tour in his forties probably has some handy tips on how to get one's body into shape for a three-week stage race. He could pitch for a job as his trainer, with a bespoke Enhancing Pidcock's Objectives programme. 

Avatar
Matthew Acton-Varian replied to Brauchsel | 3 weeks ago
7 likes

Brauchsel wrote:

He could pitch for a job as his trainer, with a bespoke Enhancing Pidcock's Objectives programme. 

I see what you did there.

Avatar
SimoninSpalding replied to Brauchsel | 3 weeks ago
4 likes

Steady, we don't want Ryan to get in trouble with the lawyers do we?😉

Avatar
Simon E replied to ubercurmudgeon | 3 weeks ago
1 like

ubercurmudgeon wrote:

Chris Horner is a blowhard and a clickbait merchant. That is all.

I agree. I watched a few of his 'analysis' videos some time ago and they are uniformly crap. It's just an ego trip.

Avatar
MattieKempy | 3 weeks ago
4 likes

Sounds very much like Chris Horner is projecting his preferences onto Tom Pidcock. How winning MTB XCO and XCC races in the same weekend can be called, emphatically in both cases, can be called a waste of talent is beyond me! It would make a more convincing argument if he'd suggested that Pidcock was wasting his talent by messing about on the road!

Avatar
Wingguy replied to MattieKempy | 3 weeks ago
1 like

MattieKempy wrote:

Sounds very much like Chris Horner is projecting his preferences onto Tom Pidcock. 

Yep. I think Americans in general don't really understand how huge an Olympic gold medal, let alone potentially two, is in UK sport. For the wider public a Tour de France stage win doesn't really move the needle in the same way. They don't even know what a Strade Bianche is. But succeed at the Olympics and they start paying attention to the other stuff you're doing.

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