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“I love you guys, but come on”: Jeremy Vine films bin lorry blocking cycle lane AGAIN, as company promises to “keep all road users safe”; Black Friday comes early to Chain Reaction; Helmets and hi-vis, Dutch style; Kuss homecoming + more on the live blog

It may be dark and gloomy outside, but at least it’s Friday, right? And even better, Ryan Mallon is here to ease you into the weekend with the latest cycling news, views, and usual old nonsense on the live blog

SUMMARY

20 October 2023, 08:09
Bin lorry blocks Camden cycle lane (Jeremy Vine)
“I love you guys, but come on”: Jeremy Vine films bin lorry blocking cycle lane AGAIN, as company promises to “keep all road users safe”

Considering the sheer scale of Jeremy Vine’s online database of cycling commuter clips and dodgy driving, which he publishes on social media on an almost daily basis, it’s understandable that a sense of déjà vu will creep in from time to time.

And that was certainly the case this week, when the pedalling broadcaster posted another snazzily edited video showing a bin lorry blocking a cycle lane in Camden – just over two months after Vine shared a clip of a driver working for the same company heading the wrong way down a cycle lane in, you guessed it, Camden.

Jeremy Vine films bin lorry driver heading wrong way down Camden cycle lane (Jeremy Vine, Twitter)

> “Two wrongs?”: Jeremy Vine accused of jumping red light as he films bin lorry driver heading wrong way down cycle lane

While the waste collection company in question, Veolia, thanked the presenter last month for reminding their drivers of the importance of keeping bike lanes “clear at all times”, Vine claimed this week that they appear to be “quietly” resuming the “illegal and dangerous” practice.

“Bin operators do a hard job with great dedication and I respect them… But don’t park in cycle lanes!” the Strictly alumnus wrote in the video.

During the clip itself, captured by the ‘drone’ flying over Vine’s head at all times, as he says (because why not, it keeps the internet on their toes), the broadcaster – upon noticing the lorry blocking the lane – mutters to himself, “And now I have to go out into oncoming traffic here”, before telling the operators: “Guys, you can’t park in a cycle lane, I’m really sorry. People have to pull round you and they could get hit here.”

Meanwhile, recognising the cyclist (I suppose the so-called ‘drone’ helmet camera is a giveaway), one of the workers joked, “Where’s your bike? Didn’t it get mangled?” – a reference to an incident from last month which left Vine desperately banging on the back of a van as the driver reversed over his bike having turned onto a stretch of cycling infrastructure.

> Jeremy Vine's lucky escape as bike run over by reversing driver who turned onto cycle lane

“Listen I love you guys, but really come on, it’s not safe,” Vine said, before departing.

While his post elicited the usual complaints on social media – with some noting that the operators would only be stopped for a “short period” and that stopping in the road and wheeling the bins across the lane would still prove an “inconvenience” – Veolia yesterday apologised and promised to review its procedures while collecting bins near bike lanes.

“We continue to work closely with Camden Council and their highways team to determine best practice that keeps all road users and our frontline teams safe when collecting along busy roads with cycle lanes,” a spokesperson said.

"Health and safety is paramount to the work we do and we want to ensure the crew have limited contact with both cyclists and vehicles. We apologise for any inconvenience caused as we develop the safest course of action.”

Meanwhile, a spokesperson for Camden Council added: “We are clear that cycle lanes must not be used or obstructed by vehicles and we are working with Veolia to ensure that our waste and recycling vehicles follow their set routes at all times and that drivers understand the importance of keeping cycle lanes clear.

“Where cycle lanes are repeatedly being obstructed by lorries, vans, and other vehicles we will seek to add additional road safety measures that keep our cycle lanes clear and all road users safe.”

Anyway… Same time, same place in December?

20 October 2023, 15:33
What the hell is going on in the bike industry? Wiggle Chain Reaction turmoil discussed on the latest special edition of the road.cc Podcast

Yep, I know we’re a week early, but desperate times call for special podcast episodes, as they say, and we managed to quickly gather around the microphone to discuss this week’s massive cycling story (no, I’m not talking about Jeremy Vine) in time for a bonus Friday episode

In this week’s episode, George and Jack are joined by Rory Hitchens, a long-time bike industry stalwart and the founder of brand new agency Greenleaves Cycling, to break down what on earth is going on at Wiggle CRS, how it compares to trouble and strife within the bike industry in the past, especially this year, and – crucially – what might happen next.

You won’t want to miss it…

podcast episode 63

> What the hell is going on in the bike industry? Wiggle Chain Reaction turmoil discussed plus pro cycling's idiot problem on the road.cc Podcast

20 October 2023, 14:58
Cameron Mason (Cyclocross Reds)
British cyclocross champion Cameron Mason joins Cyclocross Reds team after four years at Trinity Racing

British national cyclocross champion Cameron Mason has signed for pro Belgian team Cyclocross Reds (formerly Team 777), after four years at Trinity Racing.

The 23-year-old multidiscipline rider, who also finished ninth in his first elite world ‘cross championships in Hoogerheide in February, will make his debut for the Cyclocross Reds at this weekend’s Superprestige event in Overijse, where he hopes he can build on his promising performances in the British stripes on the biggest stage.

Cameron Mason (Cyclocross Reds)

“I’m really excited to join The Cyclocross Reds team for this season”, Mason said in a statement today.

“To be in a top Belgian team with top riders, equipment, and knowledge would have been the dream of a young Cameron coming to Belgium for the first time as a junior. I’m looking forward to showing off my national stripes at the front of the biggest races.”

20 October 2023, 13:53
Wiggle and Chain Reaction logos
“I hope anyone who bought recently used a credit card”: Rumours spread that Wiggle Chain Reaction has stopped paying suppliers and is refusing to receive goods until further notice, as Black Friday turns blacker for beleaguered retailer

Wiggle and Chain Reaction Cycle’s Black Friday – in more ways than one – continues as unconfirmed reports, stemming from people within the cycling industry, suggest that the beleaguered retailer has cancelled orders and stopped paying supplier invoices, and is also refusing to receive any more stock until further notice.

Those reports come as another of Signa Sports United’s companies, tennis and outdoor e-commerce brand Tennis-Point GmbH, has filed for insolvency following the withdrawal of funds from SSU by its parent company.

According to a statement to investors released today, other companies within the SSU umbrella “are currently in the course of preparing the initiation of insolvency proceedings”.

A letter sent by Wiggle CRC to business partners also asks “not to hand over new goods”, and that they are kept in the recipient’s warehouse “for the time being”.

As uncertainty increases around the future of Wiggle CRC, we analysed the current situation, giving you some tips on how not to lose your hard-earned cash should Black Friday turn blacker, with one  chartered accountant – who assessed Wiggle’s predicament – telling us: “I hope anyone who bought recently did so on a credit card”.

Read more: > “I hope anyone who bought recently used a credit card”: Black Friday begins at Wiggle Chain Reaction Cycles… but is it safe to spend with the troubled retail giant?

20 October 2023, 14:32
Cyclist who rode through red light and was hit by taxi driver awarded €190k damages

A Dublin cyclist who sustained serious head injuries after he rode through a red light and was hit by a taxi driver has been awarded more than €190,000 in damages.

The High Court in the Irish capital set the amount of damages the 64-year -old will receive after the parties to the action agreed that he was 80 percent to blame for the crash.

Cyclist in Dublin (licensed CC BY 2.0 on Flickr by Teyvan Petttinger)

Read more: > Dublin cyclist who rode through red light and was hit by taxi driver awarded €190k damages

20 October 2023, 13:20
Movistar stalwart José Joaquín Rojas set to retire after 18 years as a professional cyclist

Adding to the end of an era theme prevalent throughout this season of professional cycling, one of the peloton’s longest-serving member, José Joaquín Rojas, has announced his decision to retire from the sport after 18 years as a pro.

One of the bunch’s more charismatic riders (and arguably the owner of the most famous legs), the 38-year-old turned pro with Liberty Seguros in 2006 (the less said about that team and that year the better, however) before joining the then-Caisse d’Epargne team, with its super-cool black and red kit, the following year.

Rojas would spend the rest of his career with the long-standing Spanish squad, which became Movistar in 2011, earning a reputation as a solid if unspectacular sprinter – winning stages at the Tours of the Basque Country and Catalunya, and securing a handful of top threes at the Tour de France – before later developing into one of the team’s most reliable domestiques and road captains, supporting the likes of Alejandro Valverde and Enric Mas at the grand tours.

“17 years, practically all of it, with Movistar Team,” the Spanish team said today of their retiring rider. “An excellent teammate. Someone who knew how to put himself at the service of others and provide experience when the time came. A champion.”

20 October 2023, 12:35
VecchioJo’s latest opinion piece: We need to talk about overtaking

In his latest comment-provoking article, VecchioJo passes judgement on what should be a simple matter, but one that often drifts into what he calls “unnecessary bellendery” (now there’s a phrase for a Friday afternoon) – the etiquette of overtaking, or the lack of it among some cyclists…

Passing Ships by William Bradford

Read more: > We need to talk about overtaking: All things must pass, so be nice about it on your next bike ride 

20 October 2023, 11:53
Legendary Manchester bike shop Harry Hall Cycles closes down after 67 years

While online retailer Wiggle struggles in the face of a turbulent cycling industry, Harry Hall Cycles – one of the most well-known cycle retailers in the UK and one of the oldest businesses in Manchester city centre – has closed down.

The news was announced on the shop’s website this week by owner Graham Hall, the son of founder Harry, the long-time mechanic of the British national team who opened the shop in 1956, with his son taking over in 1985.

“We’ve many fond memories of working with the cyclists of Manchester (and around),” Graham wrote. “We’ve met many nice people and been lucky to work in an industry that was also ‘our past time’.

“We thank you for your custom, support, and friendship over the years. Harry Hall’s WAS a family owned and run business.

“We catered for most aspects of cycling; commuters, children and enthusiasts alike. Our aim was to provide good quality kit with a friendly service. I have been lucky to have worked with some great people who've helped the shop immensely on its journey.”

The shop was opened 67 years ago by frame builder and mechanic Harry Hall, who was still working as a lorry driver at the time, on Manchester’s Hyde Road, before moving to Cathedral Street in 1960, becoming the biggest bike shop in the city.

Harry Halls Cycles

During that early period, Hall also established his reputation as one of the finest mechanics in the country, working for the British national team throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

It was this role that ensured Hall’s name would – tragically – be forever etched into British cycling history. While working for the British team at the 1967 Tour de France, Hall became one of the last people to see Tom Simpson alive, the mechanic helping the former world champion back onto his bike after he collapsed a mile from the summit of Mont Ventoux.

After imploring Hall, who had rushed to his rider’s aid and lifted him up from the Ventoux’s stony bank, to let him carry on and to tighten his toe straps – by faintly uttering “Me straps, Harry, me straps” – Simpson then infamously murmured to the mechanic “on, on, on, on” as he pushed him on up the road.

Just 500 yards later, Hall was there to catch Simpson, as the finest British rider of his age succumbed for the second and tragically final time in the blistering Provençal heat.

After his two decades fixing the British team’s bikes, Hall moved his shop into the basement of the Corn Exchange in the mid-1980s, when it was taken over by his son Graham. Harry died, aged 78, in 2007, while Graham continued to manage the shop, which relocated to its ultimately final location, the railway arches on Whitworth Street, in 2000.

20 October 2023, 11:19
Iconic British road race Perfs Pedal cancelled for 2024

After we reported on yesterday’s blog comments from Yomp Bonk Crew founder James Hawkins – a new kid on the block when it comes to organising bike races in the UK – calling for volunteers to help revitalise the country’s ailing racing scene, it was confirmed that one of Britain’s oldest races, the Perfs Pedal, will not go ahead in 2024, bringing an end to its 60-year history.

First held in 1964, the Perfs Pedal National B race – which took place near Portsmouth, often in foul February conditions – quickly established itself as the annual curtain raiser of the British racing season, and lists Sean Yates and Alex Dowsett among its illustrious list of winners.

Jack Rootkin-Gray led home an ominous Saint Piran 1-2-3 at the 2023 edition which, organiser Mick Waite revealed yesterday, will be the legendary race’s last.

“After nearly 60 years of organising Perfs Pedal Race, I have taken the difficult decision to stop running this event. Suffice to say that organising a National B Road Race has become more complex over the recent years,” the 77-year-old told Velo UK.

“I have only been able to keep Perfs going with the help of my family, friends, and many volunteers. I have great memories from this event over the years and I am pleased we have managed to keep it running for so long.”

Posting on the race’s own social media account, Waite added: “It’s been a great run and there are far too many to thank who have assisted over the decades.”

> “Instead of going to Twitter and whining about it, get involved and try to make it better”: British race organiser says volunteers and people “giving back” essential to keeping domestic scene alive

20 October 2023, 10:23
And now it’s Wiggle’s turn to jump on the Black Friday train…

In what can be hardly be described as the most earth-shattering, shocking news, especially in the wake of earlier developments, Wiggle has followed Chain Reaction’s lead in ushering in its Black Friday sales somewhat early this year. 

Wiggle Black Friday sale

As of this morning, the retailer is now offering some mammoth discounts of up to 30 percent on bikes, 40 percent off on wheels, and 60 percent off on clothes and bike parts.

A sign of troubled times or just some nice, early savings? You decide…

We’ve also recorded a special podcast episode on the latest developments concerning the future of Wiggle and Chain Reaction, and what all it means for you, so stay tuned for that this afternoon.

20 October 2023, 09:33
Black Friday comes early to Chain Reaction, on what could be a grim day for the troubled retailer

No, you didn’t black out and lose a month of your life.

While normal Black Friday – that American black hole of consumerism and sweet, sweet deals that has loomed over our shores in recent years – isn’t set to take place until the end of November, Chain Reaction has decided to jump on board a month early, in what appears to be an attempt to stem the financial troubles currently plaguing the cycling retailer.

Chain Reaction Black Friday sale

> Wiggle reportedly heading towards administration due to parent company funding woes

Yesterday we reported that Wiggle Chain Reaction Cycles looks set to enter voluntary administration in the wake of a funding crisis that has engulfed its parent company, Signa Sports United, after the company that controls it announced that it would be no longer be providing a promised €150 million in funding to the business over the next two years.

Recent Companies House reports by Wiggle and Chain Reaction indicate that the company relies upon the troubled SSU for funding, without which the “group’s ability to continue as a going concern” would be subject to “material uncertainty”.

Mike Ashley’s Frasers Group is currently considered the most likely candidate to buy Wiggle CRC should it be put up for sale.

We’ll have more on this development over the course of the morning, but what is clear for the moment is that Black Friday has commenced early at Chain Reaction.

The retailer will certainly be hoping that particular moniker only applies to the deals and big savings it’s offering…

20 October 2023, 10:53
Cycling a potential “pathway to improved health and well-being in adolescents,” study finds

A US-based study has found that taking part in cycling programmes in school is beneficial to the psychosocial wellbeing of children aged 11 to 14, supporting previous findings that have established a positive link between riding a bike and mental wellbeing.

“It was really encouraging to see such a positive student response to a cycling-specific physical education programme,” researcher Fletcher Dementyev said.

“This motivates us, and hopefully others, to continue investigating and developing cycling as a pathway to improved health and well-being in adolescents.”

Outride Riding For Focus Initiative picture credit outridebike.org)

Read more: > US study finds that cycling programmes at school boost mental health

20 October 2023, 10:02
Win a grand tour, lead a group ride, and sign some babies: Thousands turn out in Durango to celebrate Vuelta winner Sepp Kuss

America’s newest cycling star, 2023 Vuelta a España winner Sepp Kuss, returned home to a hero’s welcome in Durango yesterday, as thousands packed the small Coloradan mountain city to celebrate the country’s first grand tour winner for a decade.

The festivities included speeches, GC Kuss t-shirts (obviously), and a massive group ride led by the red jersey winner:

Oh, and the very American tradition of – checks notes – signing babies…

I have no idea either. 

20 October 2023, 09:01
“You know you have a mainstream cycling culture when this is how helmets and hi-vis are used around young children”

With so much discussion on the live blog this week focusing on contentious road safety campaigns advising us that ‘safety is a two-way street’ and admonishing vulnerable road users for wearing dark clothing (equating it with texting and driving, no less), I thought it would be worthwhile to hop over to the Netherlands, in order to ascertain what role hi-vis and helmets play in a safe, mainstream cycling culture…

And this oldie but a goldie from Zwolle, shared again on social media this week, sums it up rather nicely:

Canada, take notes…

> “We ask our children to do everything ‘right’, so adult drivers can do everything wrong”: Cycling safety activist responds to ‘safety is a two-way street’ video with powerful remix, hoping to “expose the absurdity we’ve normalised”

Ryan joined road.cc in December 2021 and since then has kept the site’s readers and listeners informed and enthralled (well at least occasionally) on news, the live blog, and the road.cc Podcast. After boarding a wrong bus at the world championships and ruining a good pair of jeans at the cyclocross, he now serves as road.cc’s senior news writer. Before his foray into cycling journalism, he wallowed in the equally pitiless world of academia, where he wrote a book about Victorian politics and droned on about cycling and bikes to classes of bored students (while taking every chance he could get to talk about cycling in print or on the radio). He can be found riding his bike very slowly around the narrow, scenic country lanes of Co. Down.

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61 comments

Avatar
ktache | 5 months ago
6 likes

Anyone else notice that the let the world burn, 15 minute city prison conspiracy nutter pro-drivist policies didn't seem to get the vote out.

What stopped them being able to drive to the polling stations...

Avatar
Cugel replied to ktache | 5 months ago
2 likes

ktache wrote:

Anyone else notice that the let the world burn, 15 minute city prison conspiracy nutter pro-drivist policies didn't seem to get the vote out.

What stopped them being able to drive to the polling stations...

Well, they won'ta changed their tiny minds so it was either the price of oil or a traffic jam. Or perhaps they were so eager to get to the voting that they became entangled in a vast "accident" so spent the day blaming each other, unsuccessfully?

Avatar
Hirsute | 5 months ago
10 likes

More wankpanzers

"And all kids should wear stilts to be seen"

//pbs.twimg.com/media/F8w2xWEb0AAvFRJ?format=jpg&name=small)

Avatar
brooksby replied to Hirsute | 5 months ago
6 likes

On that Abrams tank point, there's a diagram I saw out there on the internet which compares the sight lines for various modern "pickups" and SUVs vs the tank. They don't come out well...

Avatar
Adam Sutton replied to brooksby | 5 months ago
0 likes

When I were a nipper we were taught the green cross code and to check before crossing. And that was in the days of cars with solid metal bumpers, non deformable front ends, no forward collision detection and north south engines under bonnets the length of football pitches.

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giff77 replied to brooksby | 5 months ago
4 likes

Is this what you were thinking of 

Avatar
Adam Sutton | 5 months ago
3 likes

Probably Vine at his most entitled. The binmen are in a no win situation, what's the alternative, stop in the road and then they are crossing the cycle lane with rubbish  to get to the back of the vehicle. They're doing a job and not "parked up" it was zero effort to pass them (he had time to stop in the road and moan, to get another click bait vid for X, formerly Twatter). It would have been worse IMHO to try and pass them on the nearside between pavement and dustcart if they were stopped in the road as they are working. Basically if you want your rubbish cleared, whatever vehicle you are in, once a week if you time it badly (or maybe deliberatly to get a video?) you may be inconvenienced for a couple of minutes.

The van though, that is a different story and clearly a bellend.

Avatar
Hirsute replied to Adam Sutton | 5 months ago
4 likes

I think your point about crossing the lane is important. More chance of a collision with people moving bins to and fro and being unsighted as a natural outcome.

Avatar
Adam Sutton replied to Hirsute | 5 months ago
2 likes

It seems obvious and common sense. You can see the oncoming traffic far easier than you would see the binmen working at the back of the dustcart. Sadly common sense is a rare thing today.

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Adam Sutton | 5 months ago
2 likes

Adam Sutton wrote:

It seems obvious and common sense. You can see the oncoming traffic far easier than you would see the binmen working at the back of the dustcart. Sadly common sense is a rare thing today.

I'd say that you should always approach bin lorries with caution (and reduced speed) as they usually have people working around and behind them.

Avatar
Adam Sutton replied to hawkinspeter | 5 months ago
1 like

Absolutely, a lot could happen. Overfilled bin spill etc.

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bensynnock replied to Adam Sutton | 5 months ago
3 likes

There isn't a cycle lane in any residential area that doesn't have delivery vans stopping on it constantly. It's rare to ride in a cycle lane and not to have to pull into the road to get past one. The rules are clear, they aren't allowed to stop there, and doing so creates danger for cyclists. It doesn't matter that they're doing a job, or how they are parked up for, they're creating danger for me when I need to be passing them. I don't care that they'll be gone in 30 seconds, so will I, if I survive.

Avatar
Adam Sutton replied to bensynnock | 5 months ago
0 likes

Sure so have them stop in the road and ride up the cycle lane between the truck and the rubbish their collecting. This is nothing more than vine level entitlement with no common sense.

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to bensynnock | 5 months ago
1 like

Well, I think it'd maybe be better for the bin lorry to be going the correct way up the street, but maybe this is for better driver visibility between them and any approaching vehicles?

Regardless, we've had a massive expansion in the delivery industry over the last decade or so. That is different - I guess the question is just to accept it's now a thing* and adapt our streets and rules to catch up. I'm not sure we can turn the clock back and say "do we need this? Why should private industry get a free pass in this way to drive the most dangerous vehicles ** through dense urban areas and park for free, often where they shouldnt?"

*... although countries with better support for localism and active travel seem to show that a slightly different model is possible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYHTzqHIngk

** According to the PACTS analysis of UK fatalities vans and light goods vehicles are proportional the most dangerous. Not surprising given their patterns of use and design.
https://www.pacts.org.uk/pacts-report-what-kills-most-on-the-roads-2/

Avatar
andystow | 5 months ago
6 likes

I love the photo of Harry Hall Cycles providing race support in one of the smallest cars available at the time. Quite a contrast to today's racing teams.

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Backladder replied to andystow | 5 months ago
0 likes

andystow wrote:

I love the photo of Harry Hall Cycles providing race support in one of the smallest cars available at the time. Quite a contrast to today's racing teams.

Must have had a very limited supply of spares as the wouldn't stop for me when I had a puncture in the Manchester div champs back in the 70's.

Avatar
Cugel replied to Backladder | 5 months ago
2 likes

Backladder wrote:

andystow wrote:

I love the photo of Harry Hall Cycles providing race support in one of the smallest cars available at the time. Quite a contrast to today's racing teams.

Must have had a very limited supply of spares as the wouldn't stop for me when I had a puncture in the Manchester div champs back in the 70's.

I rode many LVRC (League of Veteran Racing Cyclists) races in the early 90s in which Harold was also a participant. He was nice enough but not inclined to suffer any kind of cycling foolery - could be a bit "superior" towards any breaking the conventions of his racing cyclist generation.

On the other hand, he pitched in with organisational help as well as mechanical rescues. A chap worth knowing, despite his prickles and the odd bit of ankle-biting.

His bike shop was also typical of the age.  Rather like Huey's Ribble Cycles shop in Watery Lane, Preston, but better informed albeit always very ready to take yer money and get you out of the door with your new shiny thing.  1

Avatar
Backladder replied to Cugel | 5 months ago
2 likes

Cugel wrote:

His bike shop was also typical of the age.  Rather like Huey's Ribble Cycles shop in Watery Lane, Preston, but better informed albeit always very ready to take yer money and get you out of the door with your new shiny thing.  1

There seemed to be something alike in all the old fashioned cycle shops, my local one was Cowans cycles on Hyde road, Gorton and if you went in to ask for a puncture kit they would hand you a nail! But if you were in one of the local clubs you  would get invited into the back room where the kettle was always on and they were great for Saturday morning repairs before a Saturday afternoon race.

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to Backladder | 5 months ago
2 likes

Ain't this it? I mean, why would you get in to the business? It seems to involve long hours to make a slender living, and deaing either folks with no idea (but who expect things fixed for free) OR opinionated "cyclists" like ourselves who are also very "careful with their money"!

Was taking to someone who'd been in the business and he was reminiscing about friends he had - but commented that there seemed to be an excess of what he termed "neurodivergence"!

Avatar
chrisonabike | 5 months ago
7 likes

RE: Cycling a potential “pathway to improved health and well-being in adolescents,” study finds

I'm always glad that someone checks these things but I'd suggest this is getting towards "no shit Sherlock" territory.

One possible example: kids in NL (and then parts of Scandinavia) are apparently some of the happiest in the world.  Now there are lots of different things which could contribute there but the importance of "personal autonomy" is noted.  Perhaps being able to get about without your parents driving you (plus "incidental exercise") is an important part of that? (Plus much less traffic noise - increasingly recognised as a major stressor etc.)

Avatar
marmotte27 replied to chrisonabike | 5 months ago
1 like

This. One does get the impression that those studies are kicks into the long grass.

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NickSprink | 5 months ago
4 likes

So what happens to a baby once it has been signed?  Not framed and put on the wall I hope...

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HoldingOn replied to NickSprink | 5 months ago
0 likes

I believe they become teenagers and get emancipated from the parents that held them down as a baby and allowed a stranger to scribble on them...

Avatar
belugabob replied to NickSprink | 5 months ago
3 likes
NickSprink wrote:

So what happens to a baby once it has been signed?  Not framed and put on the wall I hope...

If they can avoid washing it, until they're 18, they can get it tattooed over

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to NickSprink | 5 months ago
1 like

Occupational hazard for some.  The birth of a messiah is often accompanied by signs.  Same for the children of George Foreman - they were so good he put his name on each of them.

Avatar
PRSboy | 5 months ago
6 likes

Vine stopping in the middle of a 'dangerous' road to reprimand the operatives is as daft as a road-rager stopping to get out of their car to remonstrate with a cyclist for holding them up.

Sometimes Jeremy Vine sounds unbelievably entitled, and this is one of those occasions.

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to PRSboy | 5 months ago
7 likes

PRSboy wrote:

Vine stopping in the middle of a 'dangerous' road to reprimand the operatives is as daft as a road-rager stopping to get out of their car to remonstrate with a cyclist for holding them up.

Sometimes Jeremy Vine sounds unbelievably entitled, and this is one of those occasions.

Well, it wouldn't make sense to stop in the cycle lane as that was blocked. I haven't watched the clip (I don't do Twitter/X), but as I understand it he wasn't so annoyed about being held-up, but by the danger that cyclists are being subjected to by blocking the lane. The problem is that the cyclists wouldn't be part of the usual flow of traffic on the road and so have to negotiate joining the existing traffic - that's usually the more dangerous part as most drivers are only looking for big car-shaped objects and often won't see a cyclist trying to merge from their left side.

I don't follow, listen or watch Jeremy Vine apart from reading about his exploits here, so I'm not defending him per se, but it doesn't sound like he's being unreasonable in this instance. I've got no problem with bin lorries or their crews as they'll often need to temporarily block roads, but blocking the cycle lane does introduce danger to cyclists. If the bin lorry leaves the cycle lane clear and blocks the road, it doesn't create any danger for the drivers and cyclists can watch out for the bin lorry crew as they cross the cycle lane (I'd give them priority and stop if necessary).

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to PRSboy | 5 months ago
5 likes

PRSboy wrote:

Vine stopping in the middle of a 'dangerous' road to reprimand the operatives is as daft as a road-rager stopping to get out of their car to remonstrate with a cyclist for holding them up.

Sometimes Jeremy Vine sounds unbelievably entitled, and this is one of those occasions.

There's no traffic coming in either direction, if there had been I expect he would've pulled round the lorry before speaking to them. No harm no foul.

Avatar
HLaB | 5 months ago
2 likes

Given there isn't a specifically designed waste collection facility and its a retrofit on an existing street I don't really see they have much alternative.   That van though surprise 

Avatar
ChasP replied to HLaB | 5 months ago
13 likes

The alternative is to stop on the carriageway as they would if there were no cyclelanes. This may delay traffic as bin collections do most places but doesn't put cyclists lives at risk.

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