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Cycle commuters most likely to get to work ‘on time and ready to go’

Active forms of transport more likely to leave people feeling energised

Bus riders are the most likely to arrive late for work and drivers have the lowest odds of feeling energised when they get there, according to a recent study. In contrast, cyclists have the highest odds of being both energised and punctual.

These were the findings of research carried out at McGill University in Montreal. The study, On time and ready to go, involved analysis of commuters’ punctuality and energy levels.

Researchers looked at the commuting patterns of the students, staff, and faculty at McGill University, surveying 5,599 people at the campus in 2013.

Participants were asked how they commuted (walking, cycling, driving, or by public transport); whether they arrived on time; and how they felt when they got there. Distance from campus, the duration of each commute and the weather were also taken into account, and this being Canada, separate figures were given for snowy days and sunny days.

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CityLab reports that the researchers found active forms of transport were more likely to leave people feeling energised.

Drivers felt energised 17 per cent of the time on snowy days and 41 per cent of the time on sunny days. Those who took public transport said they felt energised 19 per cent of the time on snowy days and 38 per cent of the time on sunny days.

In contrast, walkers felt energised 29 per cent of the time on snowy days and 55 per cent of the time on sunny days – and cycling was better still. Cyclists reported feeling energised 70 per cent of the time on snowy days and 82 per cent of the time on sunny days.

It should be noted at this point that walkers were more likely to be younger students, while drivers tended to be older staff members. Cyclists and those who took public transport were somewhere in between.

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As far as punctuality went, snowy days affected everyone to some degree. 32 per cent of cyclists said their commute caused them to be late when it snowed, as did 34 per cent of walkers, 41 per cent of drivers and 42 per cent of those who took public transport.

However, only three per cent of cyclists said their commute negatively affected their punctuality on sunny days, compared to eight per cent of walkers, 15 per cent of drivers and 19 per cent of those who took public transport.

The researchers concluded: “Overall, this study provides evidence that satisfaction with travel mode is associated with higher odds of feeling energized and being punctual. With these findings in mind, policy makers should consider developing strategies that aim to increase the mode satisfaction of commuters. Encouraging the habit of commuting by bicycle may also lead to improved performance at work or school.”

Alex has written for more cricket publications than the rest of the road.cc team combined. Despite the apparent evidence of this picture, he doesn't especially like cake.

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