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Patrick Kiehlmann averaged 90 miles a day over 11-day end-to-end ride

An 11-year-old boy from Scotland has ridden from Land’s End to John O’Groats to raise more than £2,500 for a hospital where doctors saved his life two years ago.

Patrick Kiehlmann, who lives in Bishopbriggs, East Dunbartonshire, completed the end-to-end trip in 11 days, riding an average of 90 miles a day alongside his father, Mark, reports the Herald.

On their way, they stopped at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Yorkhill, Glasgow, where Patrick had suffered complications after being treated for a ruptured appendix.

After convalescing at home, he was readmitted after his condition worsened due to a constricted bowel, requiring a second operation.

His fundraising target on Justgiving.com was £1,011 – equivalent to £1 for each mile of the journey – but he has now raised more than two and a half times that amount.

He completed the ride on Sunday and tweeted: “Done, just a little wet."

Before he embarked on his journey, the head of fundraising at Yorkhill Children’s Charity, Kirsten Sinclair, said: "It's absolutely incredible, it's such a mammoth challenge for anyone to complete, let alone an 11-year-old.

"Seeing kids help other kids is really incredible."

When he was aged five, Patrick completed the 50-mile Pedal for Scotland ride from Glasgow to Edinburgh, finishing it in around five hours.

Looking ahead to his Land’s End to John O’Groats ride, Patrick had said: “After the shock of going into hospital, I just wanted to have fun on my bike again. Last year’s Sportive was a huge achievement, but I felt I could do even more and this time raise money for Yorkhill Children’s Charity.”

Last year, he rode a 110-mile sportive that included more than 2,000 metres of climbing.

Yesterday morning, he was back on his bike again, this time to ride to school, modestly describing himself in a tweet as a “regular kid.”

You can find out more on Patrick’s Ride 4 Recovery UK website.

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.