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The US heritage brand has unveiled this updated Road Logic steel frame, with classic lines and clearance for up to 30mm tyres

The 2018 Road Logic frame gets a fresh Skyline Blue paint job, and Ritchey say the TIG-welded frame "gracefully delivers a breathtaking combination of classic aesthetics, modern features and top performance desired by discerning riders around the world."  

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Ritchey's renowned steel road frame gets a wider tyre clearance of up to 30mm to meet current demands for a more comfortable ride experience on varying surfaces. The frameset gets a new carbon fork, and the frame itself is built with Ritchey's proprietary Logic steel tubing designed by Tom Ritchey himself. The frame has short-butted sections to reduce weight, and the machine-integrated head tube uses standard drop-in bearings to reduce the weight by 80g compared to a standard head tube design.

Ritchey Road Logic front end.jpg

Ritchey Road Logic front end.jpg

Carbon forks and wider tyre clearance merges old-school looks with modern versatility 

To answer demand from dealers for an affordable package for the Road Logic frame, Ritchey are now offering the Comp Road Logic complete bike with a mid-level spec, something Ritchey say that bike shops were building up for their customers anyway. You get a full Shimano 105 drivetrain, and the rest of the spec is mostly from Ritchey's Comp range of alloy components including their Comp Zeta wheels with 27mm tyres, Comp Curve handlebars and 4-Axis stem.   

The weight has been kept impressively low, with the frame coming in at 1.77kg and the full build weighing 8.7kg. The price isn't bad either: £1,120 for the frameset and £2,099 for the complete build, and both will be available through numerous Ritchey dealers in the UK.  

 

 

After cobbling together a few hundred quid during his student days off the back of a hard winter selling hats (long story), Jack bought his first road bike at the age of 20 and has been hooked ever since.  He joined road.cc in 2017, having previously worked for 220 Triathlon magazine. Jack's preferred events are time trials, sportives, triathlons and pogo sticking (the latter being another long story), and on Sunday afternoons he can often be found on an M5 service station indulging in his favourite post-race meal of 20 chicken nuggets, a sausage roll, caramel shortbread and a large strawberry milkshake.