Aqua2go PRO - Smart Pressure Cleaner

8
£157.95

VERDICT:

8
10
Well-thought-out bike cleaner with some clever extra features
Weight: 
5,680g
Contact: 

The Aqua2go PRO - Smart Pressure Cleaner is the most sophisticated portable pressure washer I've used. It's just the thing for post-ride bike clean-ups if you don't have a hose handy or your mains pressure's a bit feeble.

Washing bikes is a pain, so anything that makes it easier is good. The Aqua2go PRO - Smart Pressure Cleaner pumps out a stream of water that shifts mud and grime, but isn't so intense it'll rinse the grease out of your bearings if you're a bit sloppy with it.

Buy Aqua2go PRO - Smart Pressure Cleaner

The trigger-operated spray gun comes with three nozzles: the usual adjustable spray, a brush and a shower head. The spray gun is the one you'll use most and it works well enough. A few turns of the nozzle switches it between a broad spray and a narrow jet but the spray gun and attachments don't feel as high-quality as the rest of the washer.

The 20-litre water capacity means that when it's full it's heavy. I certainly wouldn't want to carry it more than a few metres. Aqua2go has thought of that and fitted wheels and a fold-out handle so you can tow it around, like a very heavy plastic overhead bag.

You can run the Aqua2go from either your car's 12V socket or the included battery pack. Since you're going to be carrying it your car, and sooner or later you're going to need a torch to find out where you've dropped your keys, Aqua2go has incorporated the battery pack into a torch and included a USB socket for charging small devices such as your phone or GPS. Four blue LEDs indicate the charge state of the battery.

And that's not all. The pump can be removed from the tank and used independently. It has a standard Hoselock connector so you can attach a hose and put the other end in whatever water supply you have available. All very ingenious.

If you do stick with the tank, as you probably will most of the time, there's easily enough water and battery capacity to wash two bikes.

The obvious applications are mountain biking and cyclocross where you want to clean up a bike before taking it home, but I've found it handy at home too. It's easier to pull it out of the garage and give a bike quick rinse after a soggy ride than to drag a dirty bike through the house to the back garden. Your mileage will vary of course, but if, say, you live in a flat, then this is a big improvement on washing your bike in the shower.

I'd have liked a hose lance to get me away from spray bounce-back, and to make it easier to get the water right into frame nooks and crannies. The spray gun and attachments are a bit basic; I managed to break the brush head with some industry standard clumsiness, but it's not like I don't have plenty of bike-cleaning brushes around.

Those niggles aside, this is a well-made, full-featured and very convenient bike cleaner.

Verdict

Well-thought-out bike cleaner with some clever extra features

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Aqua2go PRO - Smart Pressure Cleaner

Size tested: 20L , Green

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

It's a portable source of pressurised water for the outdoors.

Aqua2go says

The outdoors is adventurous and exciting. But the elements can also damage your equipment, making thorough cleaning essential.

The Aqua2go PRO pressure washer is multifunctional, highly effective and can be used anywhere. Mud, clay, dust, sand and salt: the Aqua2go PRO will wash it all away!

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Aqua2go lists the features as:

Separated portable multifunctional power

Works without fixed electricity and fixed water connection

With own battery, rechargeable with 220 volts (1 year warranty on battery)

Own 20L water reservoir for 30 minutes continuous use

No limited water capacity when using the pump with suction hose

Water pressure of 3-10 bars

Effective cleaning with 10.000 pulsating vibrations

Adjustable spray positions

Illumination with 12V and USB charging function

Handy storage for the hose and sprayer

Draw-bar and wheels for easy moving

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Sturdy, thick plastic that looks like it's stand plenty of kicking around in your car boot.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

Puts out a decent water jet, lasts ages on a charge

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for value:
 
7/10

It's quite expensive as portable washers go.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

It's good. Water pressure is enough to dislodge dirt, but not so intense it'll trash your bearings which can be a problem with jet washers. The extra features are clever.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Makes cleaning a bike – far and away my least favourite chore – easier.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The shower and brush attachments are flimsy.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 48  Height: 5ft 11in  Weight: 85kg

I usually ride: Scapin Style  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, touring, club rides, general fitness riding, mtb,

Acknowledged by the Telegraph as a leading cycling journalist, John Stevenson has been writing about bikes and cycling for over 30 years since discovering that people were mug enough to pay him for it rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work.

He was heavily involved in the mountain bike boom of the late 1980s as a racer, team manager and race promoter, and that led to writing for Mountain Biking UK magazine shortly after its inception. He got the gig by phoning up the editor and telling him the magazine was rubbish and he could do better. Rather than telling him to get lost, MBUK editor Tym Manley called John’s bluff and the rest is history.

Since then he has worked on MTB Pro magazine and was editor of Maximum Mountain Bike and Australian Mountain Bike magazines, before switching to the web in 2000 to work for CyclingNews.com. Along with road.cc editor Tony Farelly, John was on the launch team for BikeRadar.com and subsequently became editor in chief of Future Publishing’s group of cycling magazines and websites, including Cycling Plus, MBUK, What Mountain Bike and Procycling.

John has also written for Cyclist magazine, edited the BikeMagic website and was founding editor of TotalWomensCycling.com before handing over to someone far more representative of the site's main audience.

He joined road.cc in 2013 and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

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