Home
“If you jump a red light you give all cyclists a bad name”

The TV ads for Scotland’s Nice Way Code road safety awareness campaign broke cover this morning and... well, see for yourself.

There are two ads. ‘Nice Way Code Name’ shows a rider running a red light, and then cuts to Monty Pythonesque gag, while 'Nice Way Code Think Horse' says you should treat a cyclists as you’d treat a horse.

Here, they are. Let us know what you think in the comments.

Nice Way Code Name

Nice Way Code Think Horse

The Nice Way Code campaign was announced last week, but will be officially launched today. The £500,000 campaign aims to improve road safety by asking road users to all just get along and be lovely to each other. 

Scottish cycling campaign group Pedal on Parliament was not impressed. According to Pedal on Parliament, research shows that the most effective means to reduce road deaths are changes to the road environment and lower speeds. Education campaigns, especially where not backed up by visible enforcement, do very little.

In response to the group's criticism, a Scottish government spokesman said: “Road safety is everyone’s responsibility and we make no apology for raising awareness of this issue or for seeking to improve behaviour."

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.