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Video: World cyclo-cross champion Wout van Aert grinds to a halt through cramp on final climb but remounts to make Strade Bianche podium

Belgian was a late invitee to early season Italian classic and didn't disappoint in epic edition won by Tiejs Benoot...

When the organisers of the Strade Bianche extended a late invitation to the three-time world cyclos-cross champion and his Vérandas Willems-Crelan team to take part in the race, it’s unlikely they expected the conditions to be more akin to those that the Belgian 22-year-old faces in the depths of a northern European winter.

But with the snow that had covered Tuscany during the week thawing ahead of yesterday’s race, the white gravel roads from which it takes its name had turned into a quagmire, and van Aert took full advantage to grab a podium spot, despite grinding to a halt on the final climb of the via Santa Caterina in Siena after suffering cramp in both legs.

The narrow street, where the gradient hits 16 per cent, comes inside the final few hundred metres ahead of the finish in Piazza del Campo and Lotto-Soudal’s Tiesj Benoot, caked in mud, had already taken a storming solo win.

His nearest pursuers – van Aert and AG2r-La Mondiale’s Romain Bardet, who had been out on their own at the head of the race before being joined then dropped by the eventual victor   – were still negotiating it, meanwhile.

Bardet, third at last summer’s Tour de France, took second place (and has uploaded his ride to Strava) while van Aert suffered cramp in both legs on the toughest section of the ascent, making him fall of his bike by the barriers, the incident missed by TV cameras but captured by spectators on either side of the road, with the rider remounting and managing to secure his third place.

Earlier in the day, the women's race had been won by Anna ven der Breggen of Boels-Dolmens.

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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