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Cambridge residents try to block junction improvements for cyclists

'We don't need more cycle lanes' say locals...

The council is coming up against opposition from residents as it tries to tackle an accident blackspot for cyclists in Cambridge.

Proposals to revamp Queen Edith’s Way, improving the road and making junctions safer, residents say are ‘madness and not fit for purpose.’

There will be an orbital cycle lane which ‘allows cyclists to travel separated from traffic and have priority over the arms of the roundabout’ at Fendon Road roundabout.

The works would need the removal of roadside trees and verges.

Dara Morefield, Queen Edith’s Way Residents’ Association chair, told Cambridge News: “With a road which is only 5m or 6m wide, large vehicles will have to use the cycle lane.

“We ratepayers, voters and those likely to be most affected by the scheme - and who have most knowledge of the issues on this road – were not consulted by the council.

“Queen Edith’s Way works perfectly well at the moment and there is no need for any cycle paths.”

During the past five years there have been 33 accidents along Queen Edith's Way, with 25 involving a car and a cyclist – the council said.

The majority of these accidents have been at side road junctions and the Fendon Road roundabout.

Vanessa Kelly, Cambridgeshire County Council’s Cycling Project Officer, said: “We initially consulted residents in 2015 asking whether they had issues when using Queen Edith’s Way and where improvements should be made.

“Many concerns were raised about the dangers for pedestrians and cyclists at the Fendon Road roundabout.

“Using this information, we developed proposals which were consulted on this summer.

“The results showed that 99 people who live on Queen Edith’s Way supported the roundabout proposals, whilst 36 opposed them.

“We believe the roundabout proposals will improve the safety of pedestrians and cyclists at what has long been an accident blackspot in the city.”

For more information on the proposals, visit the council's website here.

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.

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