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Floyd Landis – The UCI comes out fighting

How dare you! & Get your facts right buster! Would seem to be the gist

Cycling's governing body, the UCI has hit back at allegations by Floyd Landis that senior UCI figures helped cover up a failed dope test by Lance Armstrong at the 2002 Tour de Suisse.

In a statement the UCI flatly rejects the claim that any of its officials would have acted in such a way pronouncing itself "deeply shocked" at the suggestion. It then fatally holes that aspect of Landis' allegations by pointing out that Armstrong did not compete in the 2002 edition of the race.

Interestingly the UCI posted two responses to Landis on its website you can read the full transcript of both UCI releases below. In the shorter of the two which it is safe to assume was written before they knew that Landis was dragging ex-UCI supremo Hein Verbruggen in to the affair. Translated in to teen-speak the first UCI response amounts to little more than "whatever", there is even what probably passes for a joke amongst high ranking blazer wearers with the assertion that:

"An impartial investigation is a fundamental right, as Mr Landis will understand having contested, for two years, the evidence of his breach of the Anti-Doping Rules in 2006."

For its other statement on the affair however the UCI goes in to full-on shocked maiden aunt mode at the insult to its honour:

"Deeply shocked by the gravity of this statement, which considerably impinges on the honour of all persons who have dedicated themselves to the fight against doping, the UCI wishes to clearly state that it has never changed or concealed a positive test result."

The statement concludes:

"Finally, the UCI wishes to make clear that it will undertake all necessary measures to defend its honour as well as the honour of all its executives who have been unfairly accused by Mr Floyd Landis."

Which very much sounds like they are reaching for their lawyers.

Those UCI statements in full

The International Cycling Union has learned of the declarations made by Mr Floyd Landis and published in the Wall Street Journal.

The UCI regrets that Mr Landis has publicly accused individuals without allowing sufficient time for the relevant US authorities to investigate.

An impartial investigation is a fundamental right, as Mr Landis will understand having contested, for two years, the evidence of his breach of the Anti-Doping Rules in 2006.

The UCI will leave it to the individuals accused by Mr Landis to take the position they see fit with regards to this issue

Longer release

The International Cycling Union (UCI) categorically rejects accusations made by Mr Floyd Landis, in particular the allegation that a positive doping result by Lance Armstrong during the 2002 Tour of Switzerland was concealed after an agreement was reached between the American rider, his directeur sportif Mr Johan Bruyneel and the former UCI President, Mr Hein Verbruggen.

Deeply shocked by the gravity of this statement, which considerably impinges on the honour of all persons who have dedicated themselves to the fight against doping, the UCI wishes to clearly state that it has never changed or concealed a positive test result.

The accusation by Mr Floyd Landis, guilty himself of a breach of the Anti-Doping Rules in 2006, is thus completely unfounded and the UCI can only express its outrage at this new attempt to harm the image of cycling. Our sport has long paid a heavy price for the fraudulent behaviour of individuals such as Floyd Landis and we cannot accept the principles governing our work being challenged in terms of their ethics and honesty by a person who has not hesitated to breach such principles.

By way of information, the UCI would like to point out that Lance Armstrong did not participate in the 2002 Tour of Switzerland.

Finally, the UCI wishes to make clear that it will undertake all necessary measures to defend its honour as well as the honour of all its executives who have been unfairly accused by Mr Floyd Landis.

 

Tony has been editing cycling magazines and websites since 1997 starting out as production editor and then deputy editor of Total Bike, acting editor of Total Mountain Bike and then seven years as editor of Cycling Plus. He launched his first cycling website - the Cycling Plus Forum at the turn of the century. In 2006 he left C+ to head up the launch team for Bike Radar which he edited until 2008, when he co-launched the multi-award winning road.cc - which he continues to edit today. His favourite ride is his ‘commute’ - which he does most days inc weekends and he’s been cycle-commuting since 1994. His favourite bikes are titanium and have disc brakes.

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