Team edition models that are available to buy… you just need a shedload of cash
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If you’re suffering from post-Tour de France blues, how about some peloton-ready bikes to brighten up your day? Here are a few team edition bikes that you can buy yourself – as long as you’re willing and able to shell out a big wedge of cash.

Yesterday, we showed you seven bikes like the pros ride, but a bit cheaper – bikes in the £2,700 to £3,600 price range. The bikes we have here are different. In some cases they’re virtually identical to bikes ridden in the Tour, in other instances there are a few differences in terms of components, but they're pretty close.

We’ve stuck to bikes in team colours here (or, in one case, an individual rider’s personal finish) rather than including models in standard finishes that just happen to be ridden by pro teams. If team colours don’t interest you, all of these framesets are available in other finishes.

Team Sky: Pinarello Dogma F10 X-Light frameset, £6,000

Pinarello Dogma F10 X-Light

Since the start of last year, Team Sky has been using the Dogma F10 (frameset is £4,500) with a claimed frame weight of 820g (size 53cm) and aero features, such as a ‘Flatback’ down tube that has been designed to smooth the airflow around the water bottle. Pinarello reckons that the F10 has 15% lower drag than the previous F8 model.

However, some members of the team, such as Tour de France winner Geraint Thomas and four-time winner Chris Froome, have been riding the X-Light version of this frame.

“Using the Torayca T1100G UD carbon fibre in the form of pre-preg with lower resin content already used on Dogma F8 X-Light, a new lay-up, a slower and more controlled moulding process and new dedicated moulds, we managed 60g of weight reduction on the frame,” says Pinarello.

Get all the info on the Pinarello Dogma F10 here
Find a Pinarello dealer

Peter Sagan: Specialized S-Works Venge Sagan Collection, £10,000

Specialized S-Works Venge Sagan Collection - 1 (1)

We all have a spare 10 grand kicking about to spend on a new road bike, don’t we? No? Me neither. If you did, though, you’d be able to get yourself a new Specialized S-Works Venge with a special Peter Sagan sparkly finish. 

The spec isn’t 100% the same as on Peter Sagan’s Specialized S-Works Venge that we saw at the Tour de France, but it’s very close with a Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupset and Roval CLX 64 Disc wheels.

Read about Specialized's Sagan Collection
Find a Specialized dealer

Trek-Segafredo: Trek Madone SLR 9 Disc, £10,550

Trek Madone SLR9 Disc Trek Segafredo

This is almost exactly the same bike that members of Trek Segafredo have been racing recently, the only real differences we can spot being that the team use tubular tyres/wheels rather than the tubeless-ready clinchers on offer here, and they also have Shimano Dura-Ace power meters as opposed to a regular chainset.

Although Trek Segafredo bike had a white finish for the Tour de France, this is the usual team finish.

Get all the info on the new Trek Madone 
Find a Trek dealer

Bahrain-Merida: Merida Reacto Team-E, £8,000

Merida Reacto Team-E 2018

Vincenzo Nibali was riding a superlight version of the Merida Reacto before injury forced him out of the Tour de France, but other members of the team were on bikes very like this one.

The Reacto is the aero road bike in Merida’s range, the Scultura being the lightweight option. It’s available in both disc brake and rim brake options. 

Read our review of the Merida Reacto Disc Team-E 

The Bahrain Merida riders use Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupsets and, in many cases, a Vision Metron F5 combined handlebar/stem, both of which are features of the Reacto Team-E.

Find out all about the Merida Reacto
Find a Merida dealer

EF Education First-Drapac p/b Cannondale: Cannondale SuperSix Evo Hi Mod Disc Team, £8,499.99

Cannondale SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod Disc

The EF Education First-Drapac p/b Cannondale team now get to choose between the new Cannondale SystemSix or the superlight Cannondale SuperSix Evo. 

When it comes to the SuperSix Evo, Education First used rim brake models in the Tour de France but it’s available in this disc brake configuration in team colours. It’s built up with a Shimano Dura-Ace groupset although the wheels are from Mavic (whereas the team uses Vision) and the saddle is from Fizik rather than Prologo, so this is by no means a carbon copy of a team bike.

Find a Cannondale dealer

Team Movistar: Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc 9.0 Movistar, £5,099

Canyon ultimate-cf-slx-disc-9-movistar-eps_c1286

Including this bike in our list is a bit of a cheat because, although the Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc 9.0 might come in Movistar colours, there are a lot of differences from the bike the team rode in the Tour de France, starting with the fact that they didn’t use disc brakes.

Also, this bike is equipped with a Campagnolo Record 12-speed groupset and mechanical shifting, whereas the Movistar riders are using 11-speed Super Record EPS (electronic shifting) – 12-speed EPS doesn’t exist yet. Some pretty big differences, then.

The Canyon Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 Ltd (currently discounted from £5,199 to £4,549) doesn’t come in Movistar colours but it does have rim brakes and a Campagnolo Super Record groupset, albeit the mechanical version. 

Go to Canyon's website

Groupama-FDJ: Lapierre Aircode SL 900 Ultimate FDJ, £6,999

Lapierre Aircode SL 900 Ulitmate FDJ (1)

With an Aircode SL carbon frame and a Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupset, this is a similar bike to the one that Arnaud Demare rode to victory on Stage 18 of this year’s Tour de France, although the Groupama-FDJ team uses Dura-Ace rather than Mavic wheels, and Prologo rather than Fizik saddles.

Read our review of the Lapierre Aircode SL 900 Ultimate 
Find a Lapierre dealer 

Team Dimension Data: Cervelo S5 Dura-Ace 9150 Team Edition, £9,799

Cervelo S5 Team Edition (1)

This version of the Cervelo S5 aero road bike has a frame finish that’s the same as Team Dimension Data’s, along with a Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupset. Unlike the other models in the range, it has Enve SES 4.5 wheels, and the handlebar and stem are from Enve too. 

The chainset, incorporating a power meter, is Rotor Power2Max while the headset and bottom bracket are from CeramicSpeed.

Take a look at the Cervelo S5 that Mark Cavendish rode in the Tour de France

The only big difference from the bikes used by Dimension Data is that this model comes with a saddle from Fizik rather than Astute.

Find a Cervelo dealer 

Want more 2018 Tour tech? Then visit our special Tour de France tech 2018 tag page and fill yer boots! 

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

28 comments

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don simon [2545 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Get yourself a job with a team sponsor and get the real things at knockdown prices.

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PRSboy [334 posts] 2 months ago
3 likes
don simon wrote:

Get yourself a job with a team sponsor and get the real things at knockdown prices.

Yay, my Mrs bought some Quickstep floor covering the other day, do I qualify for a bargain basement Venge?

 

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don simon [2545 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

No.

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Allez1984 [22 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes

 

My friend does the PR for Quickstep Floors and rides Tom Boonens old Eddie Merkx bike, he got it for £2K when they switched to Specialized. 

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don simon [2545 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Allez1984 wrote:

 

My friend does the PR for Quickstep Floors and rides Tom Boonens old Eddie Merkx bike, he got it for £2K when they switched to Specialized. 

That sounds about right, I had the chance for some and they started at about £1.5k.

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A440 [46 posts] 2 months ago
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Of course, the nitwits at road.cc left out the Argon 18 Gallium, which won two stages of this years Tour.

But what else would we expect from a dopey millenial that tell us we can "actually buy" something?

Really? I can "actually" buy it? With "actual" money? That I've "actually": earned? From "actually" working?

Wow, that's amazing. I mean, that's "actually" amazing.

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BehindTheBikesheds [2425 posts] 2 months ago
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I've never been a fan of the Dogma's style wise and too spendy for me anyway but of the bunch here it's the best looking (with shallower rims not the deep rimmed DAs), the rest are just naff, the forks on that Cannondale S6 look so out of place, they're very much 'stiletto' forks as used BITD on steel and early ti racing frames.

Every now and again  an ex team frame/bike comes up, depending on who the rider is and the team you can sometimes bag a comparative bargain if the original buyer hasn't looted all the goodies on it and mashed on the first attempt to take a corner like their idol!

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don simon [2545 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
A440 wrote:

Of course, the nitwits at road.cc left out the Argon 18 Gallium, which won two stages of this years Tour.

But what else would we expect from a dopey millenial that tell us we can "actually buy" something?

Really? I can "actually" buy it? With "actual" money? That I've "actually": earned? From "actually" working?

Wow, that's amazing. I mean, that's "actually" amazing.

Chill Winston!

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Steve Cooper [18 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

The Trek bike is great, I just wish they'd make the logo a bit bigger - so people on the International Space Station can see what your riding.

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slappop [28 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Regardless of the cost, is a team bike even a sensible thing to buy for an individual rider? After all, they're not exactly designed for longevity or robustness.

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fukawitribe [2577 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
slappop wrote:

Regardless of the cost, is a team bike even a sensible thing to buy for an individual rider? After all, they're not exactly designed for longevity or robustness.

Umm.. what ?

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Hypoxic [68 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Great bikes but it's a bit sad when you see some white haired, pot bellied bloke huffing and puffing doing 23km/h on one of them. Each to his own though, I guess. Hats off for effort and for getting more bikes on the road.

 

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Yorkshire wallet [2269 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Hypoxic wrote:

Great bikes but it's a bit sad when you see some white haired, pot bellied bloke huffing and puffing doing 23km/h on one of them. Each to his own though, I guess. Hats off for effort and for getting more bikes on the road.

 

You could say the same of cars. Porsches driven by middled aged women that their rich husband has bought them, an utter waste of a car.

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vonhelmet [1227 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Yorkshire wallet wrote:
Hypoxic wrote:

Great bikes but it's a bit sad when you see some white haired, pot bellied bloke huffing and puffing doing 23km/h on one of them. Each to his own though, I guess. Hats off for effort and for getting more bikes on the road.

 

You could say the same of cars. Porsches driven by middled aged women that their rich husband has bought them, an utter waste of a car.

Most cars are an utter waste on the roads. Unless you’re doing track days you’re not getting the most out of the car. There’s a reason Top Gear raved about the MX-5.

You’re much more likely to get the most out of a bike, or at least out of yourself on that bike.

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slappop [28 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
fukawitribe wrote:
slappop wrote:

Regardless of the cost, is a team bike even a sensible thing to buy for an individual rider? After all, they're not exactly designed for longevity or robustness.

Umm.. what ?

My point is that there's no incentive to make a race bike that will last for a few years. If they want to win races, manufacturers are better off concentrating on other aspects and if they have to throw the bike away after a few races or a season, that's not a problem for pro teams.

The bike makers even recognize this. Here's a quote from the article about the Pinarello Prince (low cost version of the Dogma):

A key difference is the carbon fibre used in its construction, T900 and T700 compared to T1100, to ensure the price makes it a little more affordable. Pinarello also says the use of carbon “contributes to increase the impact strength and to prevent breakages.”

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fukawitribe [2577 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
slappop wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:
slappop wrote:

Regardless of the cost, is a team bike even a sensible thing to buy for an individual rider? After all, they're not exactly designed for longevity or robustness.

Umm.. what ?

My point is that there's no incentive to make a race bike that will last for a few years. If they want to win races, manufacturers are better off concentrating on other aspects and if they have to throw the bike away after a few races or a season, that's not a problem for pro teams.

The bike makers even recognize this. Here's a quote from the article about the Pinarello Prince (low cost version of the Dogma):

A key difference is the carbon fibre used in its construction, T900 and T700 compared to T1100, to ensure the price makes it a little more affordable. Pinarello also says the use of carbon “contributes to increase the impact strength and to prevent breakages.”

Yes the higher modulus carbon specs for some top-end bikes will favour stiffer, more brittle, frames - although that's not always the case, and the frames are hardly falling apart after a few years. Carbon frames are all typically treated for UV protection, the only real reason they'll degrade in typical usage, and they all suffer from potentially catastrophic failure due to focussed impact damage (although generally much more resistent to broader, 'crush' type deformations) - so in that regard the team frames should be expected to have a very similar lifes-span to a non-team frames bar a slight decrease in resistance to narrow cross-section impacts.. and the expected life-span is considerable in both cases.

 

As for the rest of the major components of the bike, i'm not sure why you would think that e.g. Dura Ace or Super Record group/wheelsets are in any way not 'robust' or capable of long life. Ancillaries such as saddles are basically the same as the what we buy off the shelf, and often changed due to user preference anyway, so can't see that being an issue.. Bottom line is i'm curious as to what, exactly, is going to make these bikes un-suitable for a public, non-team rider ? Hi-mod vs non-Hi-mod carbon has a minor difference to one particular type of damage but doesn't noticeably effect the expected life of the frame othewise, so what other things are concerning you ? I'm not having a pop, i'm simply interested in why you're worried about them.

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slappop [28 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
fukawitribe wrote:

[I'm not having a pop, i'm simply interested in why you're worried about them.

I'm not particularly worried about them (I have a such a bike myself) and agree that, if they're taken care of, should last just as long. It's just that they are more vulnerable to the minor knocks and falls some riders may get in general usage and a more robust carbon type and layup, although heavier, is more suitable for such users.

By the way, the titanium gear sprockets on Dura Ace definitely don't have the longevity of cheaper (and heavier) steel ones. This is an example of something that a pro team wouldn't worry about but an individual rider may well.

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fukawitribe [2577 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

I'll give you the DuraAce cassettes (Ti sprockets and the older carbon spider debacle) but these are all bikes that more than robust enough to last anyone a long time. The additional "vulnerability" of Hi-Mod carbon frames over non-Hi-Mod is really rounding error - of course you can get more robust bikes in general but seriously, these bikes are absolutely fine for general use and will probably get more stress, grief and abuse from the pro-riders than the majority of the folk that use them outside competition - people get far too hung up about carbon in general (IMO) but the difference a tweak in grade makes is neither here nor there. 

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madcarew [815 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes
slappop wrote:

Regardless of the cost, is a team bike even a sensible thing to buy for an individual rider? After all, they're not exactly designed for longevity or robustness.

Well, I have a top of the line Cannondale Evo, just as raced in the tour (in 2011) , with Dura ace and C24 rims. It has done coming up to 50,000 miles, plenty of that on gravel roads (On 25c tyres I might add) and the original shifters are still working fine. I've been through 1 set of chain rings, 3-4 clusters (I train on 105, race DA) and probably 20 chains. It's laster longer than most steel race bikes I had. Carbon frames last easily as long as a steel frame, and can be repaired if you crash them. 

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BehindTheBikesheds [2425 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
Hypoxic wrote:

Great bikes but it's a bit sad when you see some white haired, pot bellied bloke huffing and puffing doing 23km/h on one of them. Each to his own though, I guess. Hats off for effort and for getting more bikes on the road.

Typically pathetic comment from a plastic hat wearing wannabe! people can ride what they like, wear what they like and go at any speed they like., it's none of your business nor for you to criticise/pass judgment like you've done. It's people like you that put others off cycling/joining a club with their looks of distain and snarky comments.

If you can't bang out 25mph average over 100 miles then it'd be a bit fucking sad if you're riding anything decent!

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fukawitribe [2577 posts] 2 months ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

people can ride what they like, wear what they like and go at any speed they like., it's none of your business nor for you to criticise/pass judgment like you've done. 

Precisely, so why don't you shut the fuck up when others choose to wear helmets.

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BehindTheBikesheds [2425 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
fukawitribe wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

people can ride what they like, wear what they like and go at any speed they like., it's none of your business nor for you to criticise/pass judgment like you've done. 

Precisely, so why don't you shut the fuck up when others choose to wear helmets.

Because it's only the helmet wearing wankers that gob off about bikes being too for people/throw insults about 'pot bellied, white haired old men' riding pro bikes at XX speed. And they do it with regularity to the point where even MCN pose the question can bikes be too good for a rider, it's a ridiculous state of affairs where certain types (helmet wears ALL THE TIME!) start having a pop.

So no, I won't shut the fuck up when idiots like the abve keep attacking other cyclists for simply riding a bike!

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vonhelmet [1227 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes

I’ll bet I could find cyclists who don’t wear helmets who would be happy to say a rider has bought a bike beyond their ability...

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HowardR [231 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

Re: "it's only the helmet wearing wankers​"..... It's true!

P Bruegel (the elder) leaves a strong clue to those willing to look in his famous picture 'Dulle Greit

From the  bottom left hand corner : 

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srchar [1037 posts] 2 months ago
4 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Typically pathetic comment from a plastic hat wearing wannabe!

What exactly are you conflating helmets with here? I get your point re everyone riding what they like, how they like, but helmet-wearers aren't exactly a niche group are they?  I see all sorts of riders on my commute, particularly with the nice weather we've been having.  It is vanishingly rare to see anyone except those on Boris bikes/Ofos riding without a helmet.

Disclosure: I wear a helmet but only because Mrs Srchar won't talk to me if I don't.

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NorthEastJimmy [146 posts] 2 months ago
5 likes

BehindTheBikesheds

 

The problem is, with every argument you either start or have some form of input, you have an insane inability to put your opinions across in constructive way.  I'm all for debating matters, however controversial.  Swearing, insulting and contradicting yourself in almost every comment doesn’t exactly encourage people to listen to what you have to say.

 

Like I said before, you bring nothing positive to this site,  it also says something about the people who run this website by keeping you as an active member.

 

Thanks for the ‘helmet wearing w**kers’ comment.  Personally I don’t judge anyone whether they wear one or not.

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hawkinspeter [2515 posts] 2 months ago
4 likes
srchar wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Typically pathetic comment from a plastic hat wearing wannabe!

What exactly are you conflating helmets with here? I get your point re everyone riding what they like, how they like, but helmet-wearers aren't exactly a niche group are they?  I see all sorts of riders on my commute, particularly with the nice weather we've been having.  It is vanishingly rare to see anyone except those on Boris bikes/Ofos riding without a helmet.

Disclosure: I wear a helmet but only because Mrs Srchar won't talk to me if I don't.

Disclosure: I wear a helmet but only because Mrs HawkinsPeter won't stop talking to me if I don't.

@BTBS - I agree that anyone should be able to ride any bike, no matter their ability or skill level, but you're being an arsehole about helmet wearers.

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fukawitribe [2577 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

people can ride what they like, wear what they like and go at any speed they like., it's none of your business nor for you to criticise/pass judgment like you've done. 

Precisely, so why don't you shut the fuck up when others choose to wear helmets.

Because it's only the helmet wearing wankers that gob off about bikes being too for people/throw insults about 'pot bellied, white haired old men' riding pro bikes at XX speed. And they do it with regularity to the point where even MCN pose the question can bikes be too good for a rider, it's a ridiculous state of affairs where certain types (helmet wears ALL THE TIME!) start having a pop.

Bullshit - you've just demonstrated that it's not just helmet wearers that insult other cyclists for what they wear and ride.

BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

So no, I won't shut the fuck up when idiots like the abve keep attacking other cyclists for simply riding a bike!

Attack the message, like you did, don't go on some bigotted rant that simply contradicts what you just said.