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Plumbing tool pressed into service in Wichita, Kansas at junction where motorists encroach on cycle lane

We’ve seen cycling campaigners deploy paint and traffic cones in their efforts to persuade city authorities to roll out decent cycling infrastructure, but here’s a first – an existing cycle lane that has been given soft segregation from motor traffic with the help of toilet plungers.

They appeared in the city of Wichita, Kansas, either side of a cycle lane that is in the centre of the carriageway with motor traffic on either side, but according to KSN News, no-one knows who put them there.

The toilet plungers, covered with reflective tape and similar to the type of soft segregation known as ‘wands’ that are often used to help protect cycle lanes, were spotted by local cyclist Tom Ramsey, reports Nextcity.org.

He said that even though motorists are not allowed into the bike lane, which is delineated by solid white lines, they often move into it ahead of turning at the junction – a likely explanation for why activists decided to put the guerrilla infrastructure in place.

As a story we reported on from San Francisco last year showed, such initiatives can force those responsible for roads to take steps to improve the safety of people on bikes.

> San Francisco authorities respond to guerrilla bike lanes ... by making them permanent

A group calling itself the San Francisco Transformation Agency (SFMTrA) installed first traffic cones, then soft-hit posts – similar to wands – on a bike lane on the city’s Folsom Street as a means of highlighting that greater protection was needed.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) which is responsible for the city’s streets and had earlier removed the cones, said it would leave the posts in place and eventually install its own.

Last year also saw the Aussie soap Neighbours run a plotline involving guerrilla bike lanes when, in response to a hit-and-run collision involving a child on a bike, longstanding character Dr Karl Kennedy painted his own cycle lane on the street, mirroring initiatives that have been undertaken by campaigners in the real world.

> Aussie soap Neighbours runs guerrilla bike lane plotline

An episode of the long-running show depicted Dr Kennedy broadcasting on social media, where he said: “Normally I would not condone guerrilla action, but the cyclists of Erinsborough – both old and young – deserve to be safe.”

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

12 comments

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Grizzerly [362 posts] 3 months ago
6 likes

They're marking lines in Witchita...

It should be perfectly obvious who put them there.

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Man of Lard [331 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes
Grizzerly wrote:

They're marking lines in Witchita...

It should be perfectly obvious who put them there.

Except he was concerned with electricity

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Anthony.C [226 posts] 3 months ago
7 likes

That's a B and Q sink plunger in the picture not a toilet plunger, I just bought one !  Before you ask, my sink is now unblocked.

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gunswick [96 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes
Anthony.C wrote:

That's a B and Q sink plunger in the picture not a toilet plunger, I just bought one !  Before you ask, my sink is now unblocked.

I also have one, and can inform you, it also works great on toilets!   4

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mbrads72 [210 posts] 3 months ago
3 likes
Grizzerly wrote:

They're marking lines in Witchita...

It should be perfectly obvious who put them there.

Thanks for the earworm! laugh

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Andrew Southard [11 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Anthony.C wrote:

That's a B and Q sink plunger in the picture not a toilet plunger, I just bought one !  Before you ask, my sink is now unblocked.

It even credits Screwfix in the photo caption. Maybe available at other DIY stores, but I doubt it's B&Q own brand.

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guyrwood [828 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Screwfix and B&Q are essentially the same company which makes you wonder why Screwfix is a third the price of B&Q for the same things. Explains the plunger anyhow. 

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DrG82 [130 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
Man of Lard wrote:
Grizzerly wrote:

They're marking lines in Witchita...

It should be perfectly obvious who put them there.

Except he was concerned with electricity

 

I thought it was telephone lines, hence the lyric "I hear you singin' in the wire"

 

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Man of Lard [331 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
DrG82 wrote:

I thought it was telephone lines, hence the lyric "I hear you singin' in the wire"

 

 

Nah, electricity - "Searchin' in the sun for another overload" - telephone cables don't get overloaded. I assumed the singing in the wire was the noise they sometimes make in the wind...

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ColT [334 posts] 3 months ago
4 likes
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The _Kaner [1074 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Man of Lard wrote:
DrG82 wrote:

I thought it was telephone lines, hence the lyric "I hear you singin' in the wire"

 

 

Nah, electricity - "Searchin' in the sun for another overload" - telephone cables don't get overloaded. I assumed the singing in the wire was the noise they sometimes make in the wind...

T'was indeed the old "dog and bone"...

Jimmy Webb's inspiration for the lyric came while driving through Washita County in rural southwestern Oklahoma. At that time, many telephone companies were county-owned utilities, and their linemen were county employees. Heading westward on a straight road (arguably Country Road 152) into the setting sun, Webb drove past a seemingly endless line of telephone poles, each looking exactly the same as the last. Then, in the distance, he noticed the silhouette of a solitary lineman atop a pole. He described it as "the picture of loneliness". Webb then "put himself atop that pole and put that phone in his hand" as he considered what the lineman was saying into the receiver

Avatar
whobiggs [99 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

 

DrG82 wrote:

I thought it was telephone lines, hence the lyric "I hear you singin' in the wire"

 

 

Nah, electricity - "Searchin' in the sun for another overload" - telephone cables don't get overloaded. I assumed the singing in the wire was the noise they sometimes make in the wind...

[/quote]

T'was indeed the old "dog and bone"...

J

[/quote]

 

I always thought it was a railway line like we had linemen or lengthmen