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review

Lazer Vento KinetiCore helmet

8
£259.99

VERDICT:

8
10
Impressive, comfortable and breezy aero lid with new rotational impact system – it'll cost you, though
Decent airflow
Innovative anti-concussion system
Comfortable and easy to use fitting system
Expensive
Others are lighter
Weight: 
290g

At road.cc every product is thoroughly tested for as long as it takes to get a proper insight into how well it works. Our reviewers are experienced cyclists that we trust to be objective. While we strive to ensure that opinions expressed are backed up by facts, reviews are by their nature an informed opinion, not a definitive verdict. We don't intentionally try to break anything (except locks) but we do try to look for weak points in any design. The overall score is not just an average of the other scores: it reflects both a product's function and value – with value determined by how a product compares with items of similar spec, quality, and price.

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The Lazer Vento KinetiCore is an impressive and innovative helmet that mixes decent airflow with a new fitting system and good looks, and avoids giving you the mushroom-head look of some aero helmets.

The KinetiCore system here is billed as a 'MIPS killer,' and this is the first chance we've had to get our hands on it. Instead of allowing (controlled) independent rotation of your head and the helmet, this uses EPS foam crumple zones to disperse impact energy.

Although I love road.cc, I wasn't willing to test how effective it is in a real-world scenario, but independent testing at Virginia Tech resulted in a five-star safety rating.

I personally found it more comfortable than MIPS as well, as you don't have a cradle sat directly against your head. One further benefit is that it allows a little more freedom for the closure system, because you don't have the harness getting in the way.

Lazer has taken advantage with its new ScrollSys system, an update of RollSys. It has a similar full headband to reduce hotspots, but rather than a wheel on top of the helmet, it has a treadmill-like section on the rear. It's a cinch to get the fit correct with this, and by adjusting the height of the harness.

2022 Lazer Vento KinetiCore helmet - rear.jpg

The result is a very comfortable helmet, helped by the soft straps and plush, well-positioned pads. The pads don't tend to soak up too much sweat, and they dry quickly too, but the straps are quite wide and can interfere with glasses. Only very slightly, mind – I found it more comfortable to wear my sunglasses under the straps rather than over them like normal.

2022 Lazer Vento KinetiCore helmet - strap.jpg

The vents (four and the front, nine at the back) create a well-directed and impressive airflow, especially for an aero helmet. It's not quite at the level of a Lazer Genesis or Z1, but I comfortably wore this in the mid-20s Centigrade without ever overheating.

2022 Lazer Vento KinetiCore helmet - inside 1.jpg

The Vento hits the scales at 290g, which isn't exactly heavy but is still heavier than other aero helmets in its price range. The £269 Kask Wasabi is 26g lighter, for instance, whilst the Met Manta MIPS Aero is 42g lighter and £49 cheaper at £220. Aero helmets aren't normally designed to be lightweight, of course, but if you're looking to minimise weight you can find better.

> 22 of the best cycling helmets for 2021 — plus how to choose the right helmet for you

In fact, at £259.99 this is the fourth most expensive helmet we've seen on the site. That being said, new technologies always cost more when they are introduced, and KinetiCore is new. The Met Manta features MIPS which is of course very well established and the whole lid is cheaper, but then the Kask Wasabi is £10 more expensive and doesn't have any kind of rotational force protection at all.

Overall

I am impressed by this helmet. It may be expensive, but the new KinetiCore system works really well on the bike and – at least according to the independent lab testing it – in a crash too. The airflow is impressive for an aero helmet, the fitting system is great and it's comfortable.

Verdict

Impressive, comfortable and breezy aero lid with new rotational impact system – it'll cost you, though

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Lazer Vento KinetiCore helmet

Size tested: 58-61

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Lazer says: "The Vento's lightweight, all-new aerodynamic design is engineered to go faster with no compromise. Built for those who want more than just marginal gains, the Vento provides superior comfort thanks to the ScrollSys adjustment system that lets you alter the fit on the move with a simple scroll of the belt."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Lazer Kineticore technology uses controlled crumple zones to protect against rotational and direct impact

Designed in sprint position at a 15° angle with a reduced frontal surface

Refine your helmet's fit by scrolling the easy-to-use Lazer ScrollSys belt for the ultimate fit

Lazer's advanced ventilation system channels draws cool air into the helmet and expels hot air through the rear

The floating front headband increases airflow and eliminates pressure points, to keep you more comfortable

Keep your eyewear safe when you're not wearing it by storing them securely in the vent docking system

Compatible with the aftermarket Lazer Direct Mount LED

Manufacturer claimed weight of 290 grams (size medium)

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Feels very well made.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

It is comfortable with loads of airflow and an easy to use fitting system.

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
7/10

Not what you would ever class as 'heavy,' but you can get lighter.

Rate the product for comfort (if applicable)
 
9/10

Very comfortable for long rides thanks to an excellent fitting system and impressive airflow.

Rate the product for value:
 
4/10

It's very good, but you can get very similar performance for less.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Very well: it's comfortable, offers decent airflow, doesn't give you mushroom head, and has soft straps that help on longer rides.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The KinetiCore system feels like a potential game changer.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The price - this is expensive!

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

The Met Mantra comes in £40 cheaper offering broadly similar qualities, but with MIPS. The Kask Wasabi is £10 more expensive, although this doesn't have any kind of rotational force protection and doesn't look as good either.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

This is very well made, very comfortable and surprisingly well cooled for an aero helmet. If – or perhaps when – the new KinetiCore design gets cheaper as it becomes established, it could score higher still.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 33  Height: 6 ft  Weight:

I usually ride: CAAD13  My best bike is: Cannondale Supersix Evo

I've been riding for: 10-20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed,

George spends his days helping companies deal with their cycling commuting challenges with his company Cycling for Work. He has been writing for Road.cc since 2014. 

When he is not writing about cycling, he is either out on his bike cursing not living in the countryside or boring anybody who will listen about the latest pro peloton/cycling tech/cycling infrastructure projects. 

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