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review

Assos UMA GT Wind Jacket

9
£110.00

VERDICT:

9
10
Superb, almost flawless windproof that won't have you boiling inside it – assuming you're happy with the price
Blocks wind effectively
Considered cut
Very breathable
Exceptionally light and packable
It's a hefty investment
Weight: 
107g
Contact: 

At road.cc every product is thoroughly tested for as long as it takes to get a proper insight into how well it works. Our reviewers are experienced cyclists that we trust to be objective. While we strive to ensure that opinions expressed are backed up by facts, reviews are by their nature an informed opinion, not a definitive verdict. We don't intentionally try to break anything (except locks) but we do try to look for weak points in any design. The overall score is not just an average of the other scores: it reflects both a product's function and value – with value determined by how a product compares with items of similar spec, quality, and price.

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The Assos UMA GT Wind Jacket is fantastic – okay it's pricey, but it ticks every box a windproof shell should: it's very light, easily packable, gives zero rustle and offers exceptional breathability even as it protects you from chill winds.

We're still waiting for the predicted heatwave here in the Cotswolds, where it's actually been perfect for testing the UMA GT Wind Jacket; strong winds, drizzle carried by said winds, and some pretty cool mornings. I'd say it's the most breathable windproof I've ever used.

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At the front is Assos' very light Foil Ultra windproof, water-repellent and ripstop woven fabric. It's DWR treated for extra protection. Meanwhile the side panels and underarms are a glossy, warp-knit, windproof textile with plenty of give, so the jacket can easily accommodate bulky layers.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - shoulder logo.jpg

The rear panel is 'stretch-net' – basically a mesh with plenty of give, which contributes hugely to the breathability so many windproof jackets lack. All of this is closed with a full-length zipper, with camlock.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - back.jpg

Fit

I tested a medium, as recommended by the size chart, and it was spot on. It's been completely unrestrictive; all the fabrics have varying degrees of stretch. The entire jacket has a considered cut; a regular body and sleeve length, combined with a feminine cut to ensure it all sits just as it should on the bike.

There's no flapping, and the cuffs are sufficiently elasticated to keep out drafts without being restrictive or impossible to get over mitts (or lightweight gloves). It's a fight to get them over thick winter ones, mind you.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - cuff.jpg

The rear drop reaches easily over packed pockets, and the elasticated hem – fully lined with silicone – stays in place without issue.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - gripper.jpg

The collar is well-judged to protect against biting winds, height-wise, and neither restrictive nor irritating; it's pretty stretchy if you happen to have a high-collared jersey on, too.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - collar.jpg

Performance

As a windproof jacket, I can't fault it. It doesn't rustle. It's as breathable as any windproof I've ever used. It doesn't flap about. It moves with you on the bike. It's worth noting that the toggle on the zipper isn't the biggest – grabbing it with a thicker glove is a little more challenging – but that's a pretty minor complaint.

> 11 of the best windproof cycling jackets — packable outer layers to keep out the chill

The water repellency is effective, and holds off very light showers for a decent duration – I was impressed by it, given how thin the fabric is. However, given mesh rear panel, you really don't want to be out in anything more than a bit of drizzle; having the front half repelling water is pretty useless if your back is getting a drenching.

Assos has done everything to make this as light as possible. This means no stuff pouch or pockets, and no two-way zip. I personally didn't miss these.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - tail.jpg

You can access you jersey pockets via the rear vents. Reaching the central one takes a bit of patience, though I rarely found it a problem – I'd invariably been stashing the jacket in that one anyway. It scrunches up easily and is exceptionally small when packed down, small enough I could fit other things in with it.

2021 Assos UMA GT wind jacket - pocket gaps.jpg

Reflective detailing is minimal – there's a tab on the front of each shoulder and some on the rear seams. I wasn't a fan of the black version in terms of visibility, but there's also a Galaxy Pink version that at least offers increased visibility from the front - the mesh rear panel, however, is still black.

Value

£110 is a hefty amount for a windproof, and up there with the rest of the premium crowd. Castelli's Aria Shell W Jacket is £120, for instance, while Velocio's Women's Ultralight Jacket is £130.

If these prices sting too much, Specialized's Women's Hyprviz Race Series Wind Jacket is similar for £100 and Pactimo's Women's Divide manages to cost only two figures at £92, though Anna wasn't completely won over by it.

There are cheaper options still: for example, the Giro Women's Chrono Expert is £69.99 (and currently selling for £14 less).

Overall

The UMA GT Windproof Jacket is an outstanding bit of kit, and the quality of its fabrics, construction and fit – plus its first-rate breathability and lightweight packability – justify the price tag.

Verdict

Superb, almost flawless windproof that won't have you boiling inside it – assuming you're happy with the price

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Assos UMA GT Wind Jacket

Size tested: Medium

Tell us what the jacket is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Assos says: 'An indispensable windproof, lightweight shell jacket for female riders, formulated for maximum protection and minimum bulk.'

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the jacket?

Assos lists:

Foil Ultra: A windproof, water-repellent, ripstop, lightweight and hyper-stretch woven fabric.

Stretch net: Deployed on the rear of the jacket for increased ventilation and improved contouring while on the bike

Rustle-free: This piece of apparel has been designed to be as quiet as possible with a rustle-free fabric

DWR: Treated with DWR (Durable Water Repellency) to protect you from rainfall

Full-length camLock zip: Slim, light zip for individually adjusting to the conditions

Ultra lightweight, ultra-packable: Designed with the lowest possible weight and great packability

Rate the jacket for quality of construction:
 
9/10

The quality you'd expect for £110.

Rate the jacket for performance:
 
8/10

Great protection from the wind with top notch breathability. Only really good enough for the lightest of drizzle, due to the mesh rear.

Rate the jacket for durability:
 
8/10

The stretch means it stands up to rough handling. As with most garments, the DWR will wear off over time.

Rate the jacket for waterproofing based on the manufacturer's rating:
 
7/10

The front and sleeve areas are actually quite impressive for such a flimsy, thin fabric – but that's negated somewhat by having a mesh rear.

Rate the jacket for breathability based on the manufacturer's rating:
 
9/10
Rate the jacket for fit:
 
10/10
Rate the jacket for sizing:
 
9/10

True to size.

Rate the jacket for weight:
 
10/10

Medium tipped our scales at 107g... by comparison, Pactimo's medium is 117g. These are featherlight jackets.

Rate the jacket for comfort:
 
9/10
Rate the jacket for value:
 
6/10

Expensive, but as a wind jacket, it's near faultless.

How easy is the jacket to care for? How did it respond to being washed?

It's only been through a few cycles, but is still performing as it did at the start of the test.

Tell us how the jacket performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Does exactly what Asssos claims: provides maximum protection with minimum bulk, and most importantly, no boil in the bag effect.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the jacket

Breathability.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the jacket

The black option. Assos does it in 'Galaxy Pink' too, though the rear mesh is still black.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market including ones recently tested on road.cc?

£110 is a hefty amount for a windproof, and up there with the rest of the premium crowd. Castelli's Aria Shell W Jacket is £120, for instance, while Velocio's Women's Ultralight Jacket is £130.

If these prices sting too much, Specialized's Women's Hyprviz Race Series Wind Jacket is similar for £100 and Pactimo's Women's Divide manages to cost only two figures at £92, though Anna wasn't completely won over by it.

There are cheaper options still: Giro Women's Chrono Expert is £69.99 (and currently selling for £14 less).

Did you enjoy using the jacket? Yes

Would you consider buying the jacket? Yes

Would you recommend the jacket to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

This offers great protection with outstanding breathability and a considered cut, all in an exceptionally light, minimalistic bundle. The only real issue is the high price, but even then it earns it.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 42  Height: 173cm  Weight: 64kg

I usually ride: Road  My best bike is: Carbon road.

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, touring, club rides, general fitness riding, Getting to grips with off roading too!

Emma’s first encounters with a road bike were in between swimming and running. Soon after competing for GB in the World Age Group Triathlon Championships in Edmonton in 2001 she saw the light and decided to focus on cycling. 

After a couple of half decent UK road seasons racing for Leisure Lakes, she went out to Belgium to sample the racing there and spent two years with Lotto-Belisol Ladies team, racing alongside the likes of Sara Carrigan, Grace Verbeke, Rochelle Gilmore and Lizzie Deignan. Emma moved from Lotto-Belisol to Dutch team Redsun, then a new Belgian team of primarily developing riders, where there was less pressure, an opportunity to share her experience and help build a whole new team; a nice way to spend her final years of professional racing. 

Since retiring Emma has returned to teaching. When not coercing kids to do maths, she is invariably out on two wheels. In addition to the daily commute, Emma still enjoys getting out on her road bike and having her legs ripped off on the local club rides and chain gangs. She has also developed an addiction to touring, with destinations including Iceland, Georgia and Albania, to mention just a few. There have also been rare sightings of Emma off-road on a mountain bike…

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