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Verdict: 
The additional Peloton feature genuinely adds to the TraceR MK2, with only a fiver price hike
Weight: 
49g

Exposure's TraceR with ReAKT and Peloton rear light impressed us previously without the latter Peloton technology, but one year on it's gained this extra feature to help keep it near the top of the pile.

  • Pros: Very bright, lots of modes, good run-time, added Peloton feature
  • Cons: Still expensive

If you want to know how Exposure's TraceR MK2 ReAKT rear light performs, and what we already think of it, then allow me to direct you to Dave Arthur's full review.

> Find your nearest dealer here

> Buy this online here

In this updated version, the recipe hasn't changed, it's just been added to: you still get a beaming 75-lumen max output from this little unit, with six modes of varying brightnesses that dictate how much burn-time you can have. That ranges from 3 hours in the brightest static mode to 24 hours on the lowest flash mode, while you get access to Exposure's DayBright pulse in the flash settings too.

ReAKT is probably the best feature of the lot, as it allows the light to adapt to the light conditions at the time, as well as flare up when it senses that the rider is braking.

It still comes in a nifty little alloy package with a tool-less attachment system that keeps it secure and pointing in the right direction.

Exposure TraceR Reakt rear light - bracket.jpg

Everything Dave thought, I agree wholeheartedly with, and now there's a new feature to add to the mix. It's called Peloton, and in short what it does is recognise when there is a front bike light behind you and dim accordingly, to save dazzling the rider of said following bike.

I went out for a specific test run with a friend of mine and found it to be a fairly nifty thing – sure, I never noticed it, but I know that my friend appreciated the auto-adjustment given that the light itself is pretty darn powerful.

When he moved out of the way, the light would flare up again to full (or chosen) strength, completing the job.

It's obvious that this feature is there for use in a peloton or pace line, and from my look at it, and Dave's, it seems that it's effective. (Liam also tested the Exposure Blaze that has the same two features, and pointed out that the following riders do need to be displaying a front light for Peloton to work.)

> Buyer's Guide: 16 of the best rear bike lights

The new feature has added a fiver to the price tag (well, £5.05, to be exact), matching up with the See.Sense Icon, which isn't so bad – hardly worth knocking a value point off given the general excellence of the light itself. If you are looking for lower priced rear lights, Blackburn's DayBlazers are worth a look: £27.99 for the 65 and £44.99 for the 125.

To quote Dave himself: 'It's at the very top end of the rear light market in terms of price, but the performance is near-faultless.' With the added Peloton feature, you could say that it's just strengthened its hand despite the slight price increase – although as for 'top end', the Blaze is £115...

Verdict

The additional Peloton feature genuinely adds to the TraceR MK2, with only a fiver price hike

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Exposure TraceR MK2 With ReAKT And Peloton

Size tested: Length: 57mm Head Diameter: 28mm

Tell us what the light is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Exposure says: "Intelligent and extremely lightweight rear lighting for commuting, road cycling and Time Trial. Ambient Kinetic Technology (ReAKT) enables the light to automatically flare under braking and when entering areas of higher ambient light to create a contrast in brightness.

"Updated with Peloton mode utilises ReAKT Technology for use in a chain gang by dimming upon detection of a rider's front light, preventing a dazzling effect, but flaring up as a beacon at the tail of the pack. Features USB convenience, a choice of 6 burn times, DayBright flash pattern and side illumination for 180 degree visibility."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the light?

Features:

Output

LED Configuration: 1 x Red XPE-R Cree LED

Lumens: Max 75

Battery

- Battery: 700 mAh Lithium-Ion

- Runtime: 3hrs - 24hrs

- Rechargeable: Micro USB

- Charge Time: 4hrs

Construction

- Weight: 35g

- Anodised 6063 Aluminium

- Water Resistance IPX6

Dimensions

- Length: 57mm

- Head Diameter: 28mm

Rate the light for quality of construction:
 
9/10
Rate the light for design and ease of use. How simple was the light to use?
 
9/10
Rate the light for the design and usability of the clamping system/s
 
9/10
Rate the light for waterproofing. How did it stand up to the elements?
 
9/10
Rate the light for battery life. How long did it last? How long did it take to recharge?
 
8/10
Rate the light for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the light for durability:
 
9/10
Rate the light for weight:
 
8/10
Rate the light for value:
 
7/10

It's gained a fiver, but that might be worth it for those who work in pace lines. And it's a fair bit less than the Blaze Mk3...

Tell us how the light performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Brilliantly, and the new Peloton feature is a neat addition too.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the light

Very bright, lots of modes, good run-time, added feature.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the light

Still expensive.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

Blackburn's DayBlazer 65 and 125 rear lights are probably better value for money at £27.99 and £44.99 apiece, but they don't adapt like this one does. You can pay £115 for Exposure's Blaze Mk3 with ReAKT and Peloton.

Did you enjoy using the light? Yes

Would you consider buying the light? Yes

Would you recommend the light to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

It's difficult to give it a 10, but it's still outstanding and the Peloton feature just adds a little extra utility too: 9.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 29  Height: 188cm  Weight: 80kg

I usually ride: Canyon Ultimate CF SL 9.0 SL (2016)  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: Under 5 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding

5 comments

Avatar
Prosper0 [232 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Exposure TraceR MK2 With ReAKT And Peloton

Dear USE/exposure lights. 

I love your lights, but please stop with the stupid product names. 

Sincerely,

The bike riding world. 

Avatar
Chris Hayes [457 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

Great company.  Great lights. Sturdy (mine are 4 years old, get used daily and are still going strong with no noticable deterioration in battery life). Great customer service (when the rubber cover perished it was replaced free of cost). Repairable not disposable. What's not to like?

Avatar
RobD [786 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Prosper0 wrote:

Exposure TraceR MK2 With ReAKT And Peloton

Dear USE/exposure lights. 

I love your lights, but please stop with the stupid product names. 

Sincerely,

The bike riding world. 

They're kind of easier to remember than many of the products with just letter and number codes.

Avatar
MarkiMark [104 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes

How does it differentiate between a following cycle light and a car headlight?

Avatar
handlebarcam [1322 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
MarkiMark wrote:

How does it differentiate between a following cycle light and a car headlight?

...and how would it react if your riding companion had one of these installed on their handlebars? Would this rear light dim, causing their front light to dim, causing this to switch back to full power, causing their front light to switch back to full power, causing this to dim, etc, etc, etc? At some point, doesn't it just make more sense to implement StVZO-style regulations, and for manufacturers to sell front lights with beam cut-offs, and for people to satisfy themselves with rear lights that can be seen half a mile away, like any 0.5W rear LED you can pick up for a tenner, and not insist on something that can project a red glow which can be seen from space.