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Verdict: 
A well made, practical jacket that is just as good off the bike as on it
Weight: 
548g

The Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket brings together off-the-bike comfort and style with on-the-bike practicality. It has a useful range of pockets and safety features plus the windproofing and waterproofing are as good as you would expect from Gore. The insulation could perhaps be a little more substantial, but overall it is a great cycling coat.

When I put on the Urban Print softshell, my first thought was that it is a walking (cycling?) contradiction. It is a camouflage design, but then has a significant amount of high visibility areas throughout. So... not one for hiding from the police – and you would think that another colour would be better for urban riding. But the high-vis areas work wonders and so does the camouflage, making it look good off the bike without impacting on its visibility on it.

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This concept of being good both on and off the bike was something I appreciated throughout the testing period. I found I was using it as much when I wasn't riding as when I was – which for review kit doesn't normally happen.

Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket - riding.jpg

Part of this comes from the waterproofing and windproofing that the jacket brings. This is no surprise given the history of Gore. I used it when riding fairly hard in treacherous conditions and stayed warm and dry throughout, then later in the day could use the same coat to walk for 10 minutes in the same inclement weather, without getting cold or wet and not attracting strange looks for wearing bike kit off the bike. It made a good outer layer regardless of what I was doing.

It is very much an outer layer rather than a full-blown coat. The insulation isn't terrible, but if I were to use it as a traditional jacket off the bike I would need to have more insulating material underneath it for colder conditions. The outer layer not having too much insulation helps with breathability though – an area it performs well in, allowing me to stay warm and dry without feeling like I was cycling in a portable sauna.

Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket collar.jpg

One reason it works so well off the bike is because of the cut: it's relaxed enough that it doesn't look strange if you wear it when walking into the pub. It isn't baggy, though, which means you don't get any flapping or excessive wind resistance when you are on the bike. It even has a fairly tight-fitting hood, which can be used for protection off the bike without getting in the way when you're on it.

Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket - hood.jpg

Unlike pure cycling jackets, it doesn't have the traditional back pockets either, instead incorporating them elsewhere in the jacket. There is a single zipped back pocket on the right hand side, which is good for things like keys and wallets that you wouldn't want in the front pockets while riding. There are two more casually placed pockets on the front, which are good for non-bike activities or storing small/flat objects when on the bike. Then there is one more chest pocket with a headphone hole, allowing you to run a cable from the pocket to your ear – more likely for music rather than a race radio...

Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket - pockets.jpg
Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket - chest pocket.jpg

Much like Optimus Prime (of Transformers fame), the jacket quickly converts from a casual item to an on-bike one, through some nifty changes. It has a high-vis tail which buttons to the inside of the coat when not in use, and inner cuffs (with thumbholes) made of the same material. In addition to this, the close-fitting hood has a large reflective area, there are large reflective bands running up the cuffs, and the entire hem area and the bottom of the back is reflective, making it very hard to miss in the dark. So the camouflage is definitely decorative – not recommended as standard issue in the army.

Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket - reflective.jpg

The jacket's rrp of £199.99, although expensive for a softshell, isn't excessive for a coat that is so practical. Given that I was happy to use this on the bike and off it, it's almost like having two jackets in one.

> Check out our guide to the best casual cycle commuting kit here

Overall I was very impressed with this jacket. I like its multi-functional use on and off the bike, and it has some well thought out design ideas that set it apart from many that try to do the same thing. The high visibility elements are not overwhelming for when you're not on the bike, yet create clear visibility while on it. The windproofing and waterproofing is also excellent, with nothing getting through the jacket even in the worst conditions.

Verdict

A well made, practical jacket that is just as good off the bike as on it

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Gore Element Urban Print Windstopper Soft Shell Jacket

Size tested: medium, Camouflage

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Gore says: "Unique style in a camo print for urban adventures: Functional, comfortable WINDSTOPPER® Soft Shell for weather protection. Reflective touchs and neon detailing keep you safe. Your best friend for night and day, leisure time or on a ride."

It performs well both on and off the bike and despite the camouflage design, the high-vis areas on the jacket make it shine out like a beacon when caught in a light beam.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

2 front zip pockets

Lightweight, close fitting hood

Neon fold-away drop tail for spray protection and better visibility

Concealed pocket with magnetic closure

Pocket with extra internal integrated mesh pocket

Hem width can be adjusted by cordstopper and elastic drawstring

Reflective print on back

Reflective print on sleeves

Reflective print on back

Reflective inserts on front and back

Elastic sleeve cuff with thumbhole

Zip tags for easy opening

Zip-underflap and zip-port

Pocket with cable outlet

Zip pocket on back

Napoleon pocket with concealed zip

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Well made with a good choice of Gore-Tex materials, and well thought out pocket positions and extra hi-vis areas.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

Performs very well both on and off the bike: waterproof, windproof and looks good enough to wear off the bike as well as on it.

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10

Well made and likely to last for years.

Rate the product for comfort (if applicable)
 
8/10

Very comfortable, soft inner and relatively relaxed yet close-fitting cut means it is great on and off the bike.

Rate the product for value:
 
7/10

Fairly expensive, but when you consider the multi-use of the jacket it doesn't seem massively excessive.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

It performs well, can be used both on and off the bike effectively without looking out of place in either situation, plus it combines good water- and wind-proofing, which is always good.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The pocket placement – useful without making it look too cycling-focused when off the bike.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The insulation could perhaps be better.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your score

The jacket works well on a ride or in the pub, plus it has really good waterproofing and windproofing, perfect for this time of year.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 27  Height: 6 ft  Weight:

I usually ride: Cannondale Supersix Evo 6  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking

George spends his days flitting between writing about data, running business magazines and writing about sports technology. The latter gave him the impetus (excuse) to get even further into the cycling world before taking the dive and starting his own cycling sites and writing for Road.cc. 

When he is not writing about cycling, he is either out on his bike cursing not living in the countryside or boring anybody who will listen about the latest pro peloton/cycling tech/cycling infrastructure projects.  

14 comments

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Mental.

Avatar
webster [50 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

As much as I love the look of this jacket is camouflage such a great idea on the road?

The high vis and reflective bits look pretty minimal to me.

Avatar
mylesrants [415 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

when stephen segal takes up biking...thats his jacket

Avatar
bikebot [2117 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Last Winter I actually stopped some teenager who was riding home after cadet training in the dark.  He was wearing camo fatigues without any lights on the bike and was genuinely difficult to see beyond a short distance.  I'm not fan of hiviz, but that was Darwin award worthy

Avatar
monkeytrousers [133 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
webster wrote:

As much as I love the look of this jacket is camouflage such a great idea on the road?

The high vis and reflective bits look pretty minimal to me.

 

Sorry mate, I didn't see you.

Avatar
StoopidUserName [509 posts] 2 years ago
4 likes

There's fuckall evidence to support a reduction of accidents for people wearing high viz...yet the same bollox is written every time an item of clothing appears that doesn't make you look like a clown.

put your lights on at night kids and wear what the fuck you want

Avatar
macrophotofly [321 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have this jacket. Bought it in November when I was back in the UK for a visit. I did hesitate for a long while because of the price, which I felt was 50 GBP too much compared to similar jackets. In the end I did buy it because I felt it was a lot more visible than an equivilent jacket in black; also an interesting and fairly unique design for a winter cycling jacket.

Against a background of green countryside in daylight it would be less visible than a black/red/blue jacket, but in the urban environment (where it feels most at home) or at night this jacket is just as visible as any jacket (excepting a full hi-viz yellow/green). I would also note that camouflage works when you are still. Once you move it loses its affect on the eye.

It is well made - I particularly like the magnetic fastners on the wind shield for the top of the zip. I cannot say that about all Gore items I have (some signifigant failures which have put me off the brand). Definately waterproof; and the high viz drop down tail (not pictured above but mentioned) is a very welcome addition when cycling through water. Over Christmas in the UK  I wore it on rides with just a T-shirt underneath (well it was quite warm) and had the zip open once moving.

Most annoying thing is that the hood cannot be packed away. Cannot understand why a lightweight hood like this could not have been designed to roll into collar. It does slightly catch the wind when not worn, but does not billow or blow you - just another minor watt increase (e.g don't bother with this coat if you've just spent 200+ GBP on some slightly more aerodynamic bars - the hood will cancel out that gain!).

Finally I found it a good jacket to wear off the bike as mentioned above. Fashionable around town now - once the fashion passes it will still be good for any additional country pursuits you might do (fishing etc)

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
StoopidUserName wrote:

There's fuckall evidence to support a reduction of accidents for people wearing high viz...yet the same bollox is written every time an item of clothing appears that doesn't make you look like a clown.

put your lights on at night kids and wear what the fuck you want

But a hell of a lot of research has been done in to the effectiveness of camo designs. I don't like looking like a clown either, but even plain black is easier to see than something like this.

But I do agree, people should definitely wear what they want, all part of the natural selection process.

Avatar
Mungecrundle [1106 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
StoopidUserName wrote:

There's fuckall evidence to support a reduction of accidents for people wearing high viz...yet the same bollox is written every time an item of clothing appears that doesn't make you look like a clown.

put your lights on at night kids and wear what the fuck you want

 

Right or wrong, I hope you never have to use that argument in a court of law where some scrotey lawer is trying to get his client off a deserved dangerous driving charge, or the level of your insurance payout for injuries is liable to be reduced due to the 'camo' jacket you decided to wear that day.

 

 

Avatar
davel [2599 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
PaulBox wrote:
StoopidUserName wrote:

There's fuckall evidence to support a reduction of accidents for people wearing high viz...yet the same bollox is written every time an item of clothing appears that doesn't make you look like a clown.

put your lights on at night kids and wear what the fuck you want

But a hell of a lot of research has been done in to the effectiveness of camo designs. I don't like looking like a clown either, but even plain black is easier to see than something like this.

But I do agree, people should definitely wear what they want, all part of the natural selection process.

Eh? Where would you expect to be wearing this winter road cycling jacket? In the jungle? In the forests of the Highlands?

Or on a bike in a road, with lights on when it's dark?

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
davel wrote:

Eh? Where would you expect to be wearing this winter road cycling jacket? In the jungle? In the forests of the Highlands? Or on a bike in a road, with lights on when it's dark?

I wouldn't wear this jacket.

I do cycle on country lanes, you know, hedges, trees etc.

It will make you harder to spot, that is what camo is for.

Avatar
davel [2599 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
PaulBox wrote:
davel wrote:

Eh? Where would you expect to be wearing this winter road cycling jacket? In the jungle? In the forests of the Highlands? Or on a bike in a road, with lights on when it's dark?

I wouldn't wear this jacket.

I do cycle on country lanes, you know, hedges, trees etc.

It will make you harder to spot, that is what camo is for.

I reckon this is 'style over function', and hasn't been designed to be particularly camouflaging, but heyho.

I just find it depressing that cyclists get caught up in that classic internal victim-blaming debate: 'what were they wearing?'

I expect that from clueless cops, judges and greasy lawyers. It's pretty galling if this proportion of cyclists repeat their bullshit.

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
davel wrote:

I reckon this is 'style over function', and hasn't been designed to be particularly camouflaging, but heyho. I just find it depressing that cyclists get caught up in that classic internal victim-blaming debate: 'what were they wearing?' I expect that from clueless cops, judges and greasy lawyers. It's pretty galling if this proportion of cyclists repeat their bullshit.

It's not just cyclists, when explaining what happened in any motoring accident you will be asked what visibility was like, did you have your lights on did they etc. It's been that way since at least when I had my first accident in a car which is longer ago than I'm willing to divulge...  2

Avatar
oldstrath [981 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
PaulBox wrote:
davel wrote:

I reckon this is 'style over function', and hasn't been designed to be particularly camouflaging, but heyho. I just find it depressing that cyclists get caught up in that classic internal victim-blaming debate: 'what were they wearing?' I expect that from clueless cops, judges and greasy lawyers. It's pretty galling if this proportion of cyclists repeat their bullshit.

It's not just cyclists, when explaining what happened in any motoring accident you will be asked what visibility was like, did you have your lights on did they etc. It's been that way since at least when I had my first accident in a car which is longer ago than I'm willing to divulge...  2

Did they also ask if your car was bright yellow with reflective  stripes?