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Towns, villages, schools and residential areas could be made safer under new law

The Full Council of the Isle of Wight has voted for 20mph limits in built up areas.

Eighty per cent of the island’s councillors supported the motion at the end of last month for slower speed limits on “residential streets, town and village centres, and where people work and learn.”

Cllr Jones-Evans, who presented the plan, said ‘Slowing traffic down to 20 mph where people live, work and play is a proven way to lift the wellbeing of communities with thousands of students going to school each day, so raising awareness of this campaign in our schools is a great place to start.”

The Newport-based councillor said the Island has the second highest number of people killed on the road, of comparative areas, and by reducing speeds the Isle of Wight could hope to see reduced traffic.

Increasing walking and cycling could even save as much as £1.2 million in health care, she added.

Cllr Julie Jones-Evans accepted an amendment by Conservative leader Cllr Dave Stewart that asked for parish and town councils to consulted on where the 20 mph zones were introduced.

Cllr Matthew Price said: "We have all had residents come to us with concerns and stories of near misses.

"Even if it only saves one life, it is worth it."

For the motion were 26 councillors, three against — including transport executive member Phil Jordan — and three abstained.

The campaign group 20’s Plenty said: “We are urging the Isle of Wight to implement 20mph limits as soon as possible.”

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.