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Rider says he expects driver will be charged

Police are often accused of assuming the cyclist is at fault whenever there's an incident involving a rider and a driver. When Sydneysider Paul Ludlow was involved in a collision with a car, the footage from his rear-facing Fly6 camera convinced police he hadn't broken the law.

Ludlow was riding through the junction of West and Falcon streets in the north Sydney suburb of Crows Nest when a car driver pulled out of the junction and allegedly failed to give way.

Ludlow said: "He had a green light, I had a green light. We were both coming towards each other but he should have given way to me coming through the lights but for whatever reason he didn't see me."

As you can see in the video, it's a brutal impact. The bike went flying and the camera captured the impact as Ludlow slammed into the car.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Ludlow bounced off the car's windscreen and hit the ground. He sustained glass cuts to his shoulder and needed more than a dozen stitches. The collision sheered both fork legs off his bike.

The driver claimed he had done nothing wrong, Ludlow said in the YouTube discussion of the footage from the crash.

"He thought he was in the right and that was what he explained to the police. However, once the police saw the footage they could make an informed decision based on visual facts rather than he said, she said. The driver has now accepted that the police declared him in the wrong. Without the footage - a different outcome could have occurred."

He told the SMH: "The video footage actually showed that I had a green light and he had a green light as well, that I wasn't speeding and you could also see the position of his car was in my lane and he was turning across in front of me and I ran into him but he was in the wrong."

On YouTube he added: "My understanding is that the driver will be charged."

Acknowledged by the Telegraph as a leading cycling journalist, John Stevenson has been writing about bikes and cycling for over 30 years since discovering that people were mug enough to pay him for it rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work.

He was heavily involved in the mountain bike boom of the late 1980s as a racer, team manager and race promoter, and that led to writing for Mountain Biking UK magazine shortly after its inception. He got the gig by phoning up the editor and telling him the magazine was rubbish and he could do better. Rather than telling him to get lost, MBUK editor Tym Manley called John’s bluff and the rest is history.

Since then he has worked on MTB Pro magazine and was editor of Maximum Mountain Bike and Australian Mountain Bike magazines, before switching to the web in 2000 to work for CyclingNews.com. Along with road.cc editor Tony Farelly, John was on the launch team for BikeRadar.com and subsequently became editor in chief of Future Publishing’s group of cycling magazines and websites, including Cycling Plus, MBUK, What Mountain Bike and Procycling.

John has also written for Cyclist magazine, edited the BikeMagic website and was founding editor of TotalWomensCycling.com before handing over to someone far more representative of the site's main audience.

He joined road.cc in 2013 and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.