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a custom or non-standard style cassette.

 

My current cassette is this...

 

Model: Shimano CS-HG50-10
Size: 11-36
Cassette Cogs: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36

 

I don't find the smaller cogs that useful, esp 11 and 13.  I find the larger cogs more useful for climbing and cycling in general.  Does anyone know where I can find a cassette that has a cog starting with 14 or 15 teeth all the way up to a cog that has 38 or 40 teeth?  The climbing gears would be much more of a benefit to me.  Thanks!

9 comments

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bechdan [255 posts] 3 months ago
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Sounds to me like your chainrings are too small for your needs. What have you got at the moment?

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Dingaling [110 posts] 3 months ago
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Is there room at the outside of the cassette for a 14 or 15 sprocket? Check that the chain on such a large end sprocket won't foul the seat stay.

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Welsh boy [680 posts] 3 months ago
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bechdan wrote:

Sounds to me like your chainrings are too small for your needs. What have you got at the moment?

Really?  If the chainrings are too small why doesn't kovacsa find the smallest sprockets very useful?  A basic knowledge of gear ratios would tell you that your comment is backwards.

 

In answer to the original question, I have spent a long time looking for custom cassettes but I can only find them available for 11 speed (https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/products/miche-11-speed-primato-custom-cass...).

Miche do a range from loose sprockets and spec a 14-34.  The other option is to think about a smaller chainset, this will have the same effect as increasing the size of your sprockets.

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Drinfinity [244 posts] 3 months ago
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Miche do 14-30 10 speed cassettes for youth racing, but the intention there is to  restrict top gear to meet the roll-out requirement for youth racing. The 14 makes it easier to find a crankset/cassette/tyre combo that land right on the limit of the restriction and gives a nice close set of ratios for racing. Doesn’t help you with the lowest gear though.

Assuming you are not in a youth race, and you want to be able to climb hills more easily, then go smaller chainrings. What do you have currently?

Or you could look at an expander cog for the 40.

Even more exotic, Absolute Black do a set that replaces the lowest 4 gears, and a 13 tooth sprocket that will take a lock ring. Though why they don’t just do a whole cassette there given they have already replaced half of it...

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kovacsa [15 posts] 3 months ago
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Welsh boy wrote:
bechdan wrote:

Sounds to me like your chainrings are too small for your needs. What have you got at the moment?

Really?  If the chainrings are too small why doesn't kovacsa find the smallest sprockets very useful?  A basic knowledge of gear ratios would tell you that your comment is backwards.

 

In answer to the original question, I have spent a long time looking for custom cassettes but I can only find them available for 11 speed (https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/products/miche-11-speed-primato-custom-cass...).

Miche do a range from loose sprockets and spec a 14-34.  The other option is to think about a smaller chainset, this will have the same effect as increasing the size of your sprockets.

 

Hey, Thanks for the feedback.  This is my current setup... https://www.bikes.com/en/bikes/whistler/2015  Make sure to select Whistler 70.  It seems more and more liek custom cassettes are hard to find.  Using smaller chainrings might be the answer.  I've been told this about my chainrings... "Thats a Touring chainset. A standard triple MTB one is 22/32/44"  Idk, If I'm looking for a full on MTB chainset as it might go too far the other way.  Any advise?  

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bechdan [255 posts] 3 months ago
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Sorry yes I said the wrong thing there, cassette too small and chainrings too big, thanks for correcting.

The Whistler 70 has 26-38-48 so yes trying a MTB triple sounds like what youre after

You can compare different combinations by using a gear calc
http://gears.mtbcrosscountry.com/#700c/28I34I19

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Drinfinity [244 posts] 3 months ago
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Ok , found the bike now. Yes, going to a standard MTB with a 22 32 44 would be a good move. 44 on the big ring would give you about 50km/h at 100 rpm (which is spinning fairly fast).

Octalink is an old standard now, so lots of bargains (I still have it my road bike, got some really cheap carbon cranks). There’s a Deore crankset for £36 on Amazon now. 

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CXR94Di2 [2689 posts] 3 months ago
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A shimano 14-28 cass would do as a donor,  use the bottom two or three cogs replacing your current gears.  I think SJS sells indivual cogs if money is tight

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mc [26 posts] 3 months ago
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Going by the spec details I've found for a 2015 Whistler 70, it uses a Shimano T521 Octalink crankset.

Now checking the spec for that on Shimano's site ( https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/shimano/FC-T521.html )it lists PCD as 104/64, which is standard MTB 4 bolt chainring PCD.

So all you really need to do is swap chain rings (assuming the rest of the drivetrain isn't too worn, in which case you would be better changing everything). Although triple and even double MTB cranks aren't as common as they used to be (other than the leisure/XC areas, MTB is now predominantly single ring), there is a still a reasonable selection of 4 bolt chainrings available.

You can get 22t SLX 64mm PCD chainring for £5.99 on CRC, or a Deore for £7.99 (I'm not sure why there's a price difference, as I'm pretty sure both use steel. I could be wrong, but I think it's XT level before they move to aluminium for the small ring).