Transcontinental Race: Helping a fallen comrade

Martin Cox explains why he didn't carry on to Istanbul

by themartincox   August 25, 2014  

There's been some interest in why I scratched from the Transcontinental race, when I could have quite clearly carried on going to Istanbul. I've wanted to write this for a few days, but felt that the time wasn't quite right.

I absolutely don't want the reader to think too much into this, but simply recognise that a great many people would do the exact same thing if placed in the same scenario. People are inherently good.

My racing season this year has featured just two events. You can see how well the first one went here, so it might be fairly obvious how keen I'd be to do well in the Transcontinental.

I missed its inaugural year as I had plans of riding across Northern Europe already, so this race was the culmination of 18 months of excitement.

As you've already seen here and here I was having a less than stellar race by the time I arrived in Italy. The Stelvio, via the Umbrail side, in conjunction with the Fluela Pass and some pretty unique routing had knacked this as a race for me, but as far as adventures go, I was still rocking it hard (I'm totally down with the kids, eh).

I'd just left Verona, home of the Montagues and Capulets, when I saw a message on Facebook saying that a racer had been hit by a car and was in need of assistance.

I didn't know who the racer was, number 97 Evangelos Voulgarakis. I didn't know if he spoke English and I didn't even know if I would do any good by visiting with him. But what I did know is how rubbish it is to wake from surgery and have nobody there for you. I knew how upset he would be about his race, and I think I knew that a friendly face would give him comfort at this time. There was no real decision to be made.

I tried to get the first train back, and after waiting for 45 minutes I was waved away dismissively by the guard who just told me there was no room for my bike. So I TT'd my way back to Verona, about 25 miles, to get to the hospital and my fallen comrade.

I arrived, and after saying the Italian for bicycle (bici - pronounced beetchy) I found my way to his room. As I thought, we didnt recognise each other, but no matter: the Transcontinental cap atop my head was enough to settle him and provide comfort.

It turned out he had been driven into by a car, smashing into his calf and breaking the fibula. There was blood and pain everywhere, and if truth be told, I really didn't know what I was doing there, but it felt like the right thing to be doing.

Sparing you salacious details, I stayed the next 24 hours, pretty much scuppering any chance of me being able to get to Istanbul, via any means, in time for my flight home at the end of the week. We talked when he was awake, telling stories of family and children, I passed messages from his wife and helped her to stay current as she was still stuck in Greece. He slept a lot. After surgery the doctors told me to keep him awake. Really doc, the guy has just ridden 1000km across Europe, all his body wants is sleep!

I watched as my 18 months slipped away, all the while helping this bike rider whose need, and the need of his family, was far greater than my own

I write this five days after the event, when I've been able to watch the other racers cross strange lands and have adventures of their own, and of course I'm a little downbeat about my curtailed race, but I know that next year will soon come around, and with it my chance to attempt this race.

At that moment, at that time, I made the absolute right decision, no doubts in my mind or heart about it.

That's one of the great things about the Transcontinental race, and which I believe sets in apart from other races. It's not just about digging deep into your hurt-locker like Kristoff or Pippa did to win. It's far more of a journey, an opportunity if you will, to see how you cope with trials and adversity. All the racers will face them. Some will crumble at the first challenge; others will face the head-on with a grin and look to overcome; others still will simply go through them, struggling against the weight of expectations of self and also family, slowly grinding out the miles.

Me? Well I was faced with an opportunity to help someone in need, to put aside my own desires and help someone who needed it more than I did. I can be a bit of a dick at time, I'm glad this wasn't one of them.

I hope that my sponsors won't be too disappointed in my lack of racing, but more importantly I hope that I can show a positive example to my kids, and show them what's truly important.

It turns out I'm kind of a big deal in the Greek brevet community right now, but as I said at the start, I believe most people would have done exactly the same.

So, what do you do when you leave an environment like Verona? Well of course you go back up to the Stelvio and ensure you're not disqualified from the race, until it's on your own terms!

I'll be back in 2015, permission from my wife to be granted in the future, I'll race, I'll suffer and if the need arises, I would do the same again.

Mike Hall has created a fantastic race, so much credit should go to him, and if you have even half a chance to enter, you should do so. Don't worry if you think you're not fit enough now, there's time for that. This race will stretch you both mentally and physically, and you certainly won't regret entering.

I want to say thanks to Tony and Dave here at Road.cc for allowing me to write about the race and my experience. It's been fun and certainly helped with my discipline. There's a couple more race related posts still left to come, especially for those who want to know how to get started in this madness.

Bon route!

43 user comments

Latest 30 commentsNewest firstBest ratedAll

Joeinpoole wrote:
Jesus H Christ. You were never in 'a race'. It's quite clear you weren't even *remotely* equipped, in terms of experience and speed, to compete to win the event. You were simply on a long sportive ... and I do genuinely applaud your guts to even attempt it.

What irritates me is your faux claims to heroism ... 'I gave up my race to save a fellow competitor'. You didn't. It's like you've tried to draw a parallel with yachtsmen in the Southern Ocean, who give up their *genuine* chance of winning a prestigious event, to go to each other's aid because it really is a life-or-death situation when there's literally no other help available within 1000 miles.

Giving up your 'race' to hold the hand of a fellow 'competitor', who was already safely tucked up in hospital, and whose life wasn't in any danger is utter nonsense.

My impression is that you were under-prepared for the rigours of the event, realised that you couldn't make it and were then grateful to grasp a face-saving excuse to give up early. To then claim 'heroism' for doing so is really cheap IMHO.


Jesus H Christ indeed.
I'd love a crack at something like this, despite the fact that my chances of troubling the leaderboard would be zero. In my view part of the rationale of the event is for people to have a crack at it- to set the goal, get out there and have an adventure, when they maybe couldn't commit to going round the world.
He's not saying he saved the guy's life or anything. He's not making out he gave up a win. It's not like this is his only post about the race. He helped the guy out when he didn't have to.
You're being far too harsh.

posted by Chuck [393 posts]
26th August 2014 - 12:01

6 Likes

Chapeau, Mr Cox, chapeau. Not only for your stopping to provide support to a fellow human being, but also for your measured response to joeinpoole.

First time, I've ever felt compelled to reply to a post on road.cc.

posted by SkinnyGoat [2 posts]
26th August 2014 - 12:52

7 Likes

Chapeau Martin- and well done on the measured response to joeinpoole's blithering idiocy! You did an incredible thing, it great to read these tales.

posted by Al__S [591 posts]
26th August 2014 - 13:01

7 Likes

Removed

Rider 99 in the 2014 Transcontinental

posted by Dobbsy [38 posts]
26th August 2014 - 19:27

6 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
Jesus H Christ. You were never in 'a race'. It's quite clear you weren't even *remotely* equipped, in terms of experience and speed, to compete to win the event. You were simply on a long sportive ... and I do genuinely applaud your guts to even attempt it.

What irritates me is your faux claims to heroism ... 'I gave up my race to save a fellow competitor'. You didn't. It's like you've tried to draw a parallel with yachtsmen in the Southern Ocean, who give up their *genuine* chance of winning a prestigious event, to go to each other's aid because it really is a life-or-death situation when there's literally no other help available within 1000 miles.

Giving up your 'race' to hold the hand of a fellow 'competitor', who was already safely tucked up in hospital, and whose life wasn't in any danger is utter nonsense.

My impression is that you were under-prepared for the rigours of the event, realised that you couldn't make it and were then grateful to grasp a face-saving excuse to give up early. To then claim 'heroism' for doing so is really cheap IMHO.

As a rider who actually made it to the start line of this event and most of the way to Istanbul before I melted my rims ending my 'race' I'd kindly like to ask you to keep your 'analysis' to yourself or at least properly think through the context of the event your commenting on.

There were 3 men with a chance of the win and in reality it was known well in advance that one was an overwhelming favourite. So with this being the reality beforehand for most, Just about everyone that rolled up to the start line was signing up for their own personal race, a challenge to meet their own targets and goals.

I too had a 10 day target like Martin. I couldn't have cared less where any other rider was, what my position was or even what armchair warriors like yourself would think of my performance. My race against my goals.

That said if I think of the sacrifice it would have taken to abandon the chance of fulfilling the personal goals I had set and worked so hard towards I'm truly in awe of how quickly Martin made the decision and turned around.

I had given so much physically sacrificed all my free time literally dominating my life for around a year to be ready for the race and put so much in financially just to give myself a chance of riding across Europe. To give all that up for another rider is no face saving grasp at the first opportunity, it's truly selfless.

I understand that some people won't get this 'race' and the work it takes to even get to the start line and have a go but to dismiss all the hard work behind the scenes and suggest the decision to scratch was an attempt to find an easy way out due to being under prepared / having a bad day is hugely insulting to Martin and to everyone who started the race.

I'll be on the start line again next year to finish what I've started (long sportive or whatever derogatory term you assign to it) hopefully I'll see Martin out there and I'd like to see you out there too prepared, ready and out to win!!

Rider 99 in the 2014 Transcontinental

posted by Dobbsy [38 posts]
26th August 2014 - 19:34

7 Likes

.

Rider 99 in the 2014 Transcontinental

posted by Dobbsy [38 posts]
28th August 2014 - 8:29

6 Likes

It never ceases to amaze me how many miserable b######s there are that comment on stuff on this site.

posted by ChancerOnABike [13 posts]
28th August 2014 - 20:48

4 Likes

Dobbsy wrote:
Joeinpoole wrote:
Jesus H Christ. You were never in 'a race'. It's quite clear you weren't even *remotely* equipped, in terms of experience and speed, to compete to win the event. You were simply on a long sportive ... and I do genuinely applaud your guts to even attempt it.

What irritates me is your faux claims to heroism ... 'I gave up my race to save a fellow competitor'. You didn't. It's like you've tried to draw a parallel with yachtsmen in the Southern Ocean, who give up their *genuine* chance of winning a prestigious event, to go to each other's aid because it really is a life-or-death situation when there's literally no other help available within 1000 miles.

Giving up your 'race' to hold the hand of a fellow 'competitor', who was already safely tucked up in hospital, and whose life wasn't in any danger is utter nonsense.

My impression is that you were under-prepared for the rigours of the event, realised that you couldn't make it and were then grateful to grasp a face-saving excuse to give up early. To then claim 'heroism' for doing so is really cheap IMHO.

As a rider who actually made it to the start line of this event and most of the way to Istanbul before I melted my rims ending my 'race' I'd kindly like to ask you to keep your 'analysis' to yourself or at least properly think through the context of the event your commenting on.

There were 3 men with a chance of the win and in reality it was known well in advance that one was an overwhelming favourite. So with this being the reality beforehand for most, Just about everyone that rolled up to the start line was signing up for their own personal race, a challenge to meet their own targets and goals.

I too had a 10 day target like Martin. I couldn't have cared less where any other rider was, what my position was or even what armchair warriors like yourself would think of my performance. My race against my goals.

That said if I think of the sacrifice it would have taken to abandon the chance of fulfilling the personal goals I had set and worked so hard towards I'm truly in awe of how quickly Martin made the decision and turned around.

I had given so much physically sacrificed all my free time literally dominating my life for around a year to be ready for the race and put so much in financially just to give myself a chance of riding across Europe. To give all that up for another rider is no face saving grasp at the first opportunity, it's truly selfless.

I understand that some people won't get this 'race' and the work it takes to even get to the start line and have a go but to dismiss all the hard work behind the scenes and suggest the decision to scratch was an attempt to find an easy way out due to being under prepared / having a bad day is hugely insulting to Martin and to everyone who started the race.

I'll be on the start line again next year to finish what I've started (long sportive or whatever derogatory term you assign to it) hopefully I'll see Martin out there and I'd like to see you out there too prepared, ready and out to win!!

Don't get me wrong Dobbsy. I'm in utter awe of anyone who even attempts this extreme challenge.

I just got a bit pissed-off with the constant 'smell of burning martyr' from the OP. I see he's at it again telling us for the umpteenth time how he spent millions of years collecting rubbish from some mountain that he rode and how many tears that he shed in doing so. I don't think Hillary shed any tears climbing Everest. I don't remember Bannister shedding tears when he broke the 4-min mile. Struggling to remember Botham shedding tears as be became England's greatest bowler and batsman. Not sure why the fuck the OP was crying at all. It's just not an appropriate reaction for someone who owns a pair of testicles as far as I'm concerned.

In contrast, you Sir, Mr Dobbsy, have been quiet in your pain and your endeavour ... and that's *exactly* how it should be. Chapeau. I salute you.

posted by Joeinpoole [277 posts]
29th August 2014 - 1:52

1 Like

Joeinpoole wrote:

Don't get me wrong Dobbsy. I'm in utter awe of anyone who even attempts this extreme challenge.

I just got a bit pissed-off with the constant 'smell of burning martyr' from the OP. I see he's at it again telling us for the umpteenth time how he spent millions of years collecting rubbish from some mountain that he rode and how many tears that he shed in doing so. I don't think Hillary shed any tears climbing Everest. I don't remember Bannister shedding tears when he broke the 4-min mile. Struggling to remember Botham shedding tears as be became England's greatest bowler and batsman. Not sure why the fuck the OP was crying at all. It's just not an appropriate reaction for someone who owns a pair of testicles as far as I'm concerned.

so you've been roundly outgunned in your original assertion and now you're switching to being cross that someone cried?

you're right though, i can't think of a single male human that ever cried due to some sort of sporting endeavour, so your random selection of three from the annals of sporting history certainly isn't a straw man. stiff upper lip and all that.

Dave Atkinson's picture

posted by Dave Atkinson [7435 posts]
29th August 2014 - 7:55

7 Likes

My nephew did the Transcontinental last year and was planning to do it this time around but had to pull out. I followed his progress closely last year and had a long talk with him about it after. I was impressed when he entered and even more so when he told me of his travails. I'm impressed by anyone who rides this race and completes it, having heard at first hand just how tough it is.

Dropping out of it to sit with a fallen rider shows a touch of humanity that we could all consider adopting in our lives. I doff my hat to the Martin Cox's courage in entering this race in the first place, and also to his sportsmanship in assisting someone who was injured.

I'll be looking forward to Martin Cox's posts next year and I hope my nephew will be able to compete against him.

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2241 posts]
29th August 2014 - 9:20

5 Likes

The first Ascent of Mount Everest. An account by Sir Edmund Hillary (after the successful summit)
The rest of the evening will be blur of questions & hugs & drink & laughter & tears.
http://www.hstry.co/timelines/everest

and I can't really be bothered to look for more, but you get the idea.

I spent 3 hours on the 3rd climb, possibly not even mentioned in the blog, but you've a valid point, I was pretty slow.

As to why was crying, well the first time was the recognition of just how much I was struggling up the pass, and to some extent a feeling of letting down my wife as I wasn't progressing as fast as I had hoped. And the 2nd time I cried was because I was so ruddy happy with how my day was going, and a realisation that despite the fact I'd scratched from the race I was still up a hill in Italy having a blast of a time instead of simply bashing keys at my workstation wishing I was going out riding.....

There you have it, I cried in sadness/desperation and in sheer joy. Every rider in the race will have their own story to tell, however if road.cc was flooded with 90 posts every day I'm going to hazard a guess that readers might not like it. Sadly for you, I'm the one who was writing so you get to hear about my experience rather than anyone else's, who knows maybe next year it could be you writing, that would be awesome!

And I don't own a pair of testicles, I have them, but me and the bread-knife share everything 50/50!

So you signing up for next year then?

Racer 074 for the 2014 Transcontinental Race; 2,000 miles from London to Istanbul.

http://themartincox.co.uk/2014/03/racer-074-transcontinental-race-2014/

posted by themartincox [366 posts]
29th August 2014 - 16:44

6 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
Not sure why the fuck the OP was crying at all. It's just not an appropriate reaction for someone who owns a pair of testicles as far as I'm concerned.

So real men can't cry? Wow, emotionally stunted as well as overly aggressive about someone doing a good deed. You really are a treasure.

posted by step-hent [694 posts]
29th August 2014 - 17:30

7 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
Jesus H Christ. You were never in 'a race'. It's quite clear you weren't even *remotely* equipped, in terms of experience and speed, to compete to win the event. You were simply on a long sportive ... and I do genuinely applaud your guts to even attempt it.
What irritates me is your faux claims to heroism ... 'I gave up my race to save a fellow competitor'. You didn't. It's like you've tried to draw a parallel with yachtsmen in the Southern Ocean, who give up their *genuine* chance of winning a prestigious event, to go to each other's aid because it really is a life-or-death situation when there's literally no other help available within 1000 miles.

Giving up your 'race' to hold the hand of a fellow 'competitor', who was already safely tucked up in hospital, and whose life wasn't in any danger is utter nonsense.

My impression is that you were under-prepared for the rigours of the event, realised that you couldn't make it and were then grateful to grasp a face-saving excuse to give up early. To then claim 'heroism' for doing so is really cheap IMHO.

Hmm... A race is a race even if you are loosing, or never had much chance of winning. Giving up when you are loosing to achieve another objective is laudable; especially if he did bring some assistance to another rider in hospital on his own. Though the article is a bit selfaggrandizing and you might wonder how motivated he would be to stop if he were that much nearer the front.
I guess this isn't 'Touching the Void' and without a full blown analysis of his angst of seeing his dream slipping away and distress of hearing about the crash its hard to judge motivation.

A 'bit' selfaggrandizing? A hell of a lot, I'd say. Yes, Joe sounds harsh, but come on, looks to me like Cox saw an opportunity to get out of the ride and have a story for his blog that would generate praise for his efforts. Looks like that's his purpose in all of his blogs, which I've just read for the first - and last - time.

Psychle

posted by psychle [9 posts]
29th August 2014 - 22:41

1 Like

Joeinpoole wrote:
Not sure why the fuck the OP was crying at all. It's just not an appropriate reaction for someone who owns a pair of testicles as far as I'm concerned.

You're absolutely right Joe. We must make sincere efforts to withdraw the sporting achievements of any athlete who has shed a tear for their life's dreams, efforts and aspirations; in the name preserving the sanctity of true manhood. For true manhood doesn't feel. True manhood doesn't think. True manhood sits behind a computer and derides the lesser men who open the doors of uncertainly and pedal through them.

You have no right to cry, Mr. Cox. I am a guy on the internet, and I decide when you cry, and when you do not. And you do not ever cry. Is that clear?

We are the coldblooded, inhuman monsters of the internet; the machines among men. And our time is come.

posted by Quince [153 posts]
29th August 2014 - 23:28

6 Likes

themartincox wrote:

And I don't own a pair of testicles, I have them, but me and the bread-knife share everything 50/50!

Yeah right! That says *everything* about you. Obviously you'll be getting sympathetic period-pains every month too. I'm actually quite surprised that you didn't use that as your excuse to quit on the exercise that you couldn't handle. Fortunately the Greek chappy saved you from having to use that one.

posted by Joeinpoole [277 posts]
30th August 2014 - 1:16

2 Likes

step-hent wrote:
Joeinpoole wrote:
Not sure why the fuck the OP was crying at all. It's just not an appropriate reaction for someone who owns a pair of testicles as far as I'm concerned.

So real men can't cry? Wow, emotionally stunted as well as overly aggressive about someone doing a good deed. You really are a treasure.

I think it's absolutely fine for 'real men', as you put it, to have a wet eye in sympathy with *someone else's* plight. It is a totally different thing for a bloke to cry about his own situation ... especially when he has willingly put himself into said predicament. That's just pathetic.

posted by Joeinpoole [277 posts]
30th August 2014 - 1:24

0 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
themartincox wrote:

And I don't own a pair of testicles, I have them, but me and the bread-knife share everything 50/50!

Yeah right! That says *everything* about you. Obviously you'll be getting sympathetic period-pains every month too. I'm actually quite surprised that you didn't use that as your excuse to quit on the exercise that you couldn't handle. Fortunately the Greek chappy saved you from having to use that one.

mostly we're learning about you in this thread, not martin. can't say i've much desire to visit poole right now.

Dave Atkinson's picture

posted by Dave Atkinson [7435 posts]
30th August 2014 - 6:34

6 Likes

Was Martin having a bit of a toot on his own trumpet? Probably. Was he painting a rosy picture of his motivations to cast himself in the best light? Maybe. Is Joe a total bell end? Definitely. But everyone else is guilty for breaking the first rule of the Interwebs. Never. Feed. The. Troll.

posted by Spatulala [45 posts]
30th August 2014 - 8:50

4 Likes

Please dont feed the troll Yawn

posted by lookmanohands [103 posts]
30th August 2014 - 10:52

1 Like

This blog is not about you Joeinpoole; but would you like to share with us an activity you are particularly proud of? Obviously I promise we will be ever so nice and not say anything nasty Rolling On The Floor

posted by SideBurn [837 posts]
30th August 2014 - 11:22

2 Likes

SideBurn wrote:
This blog is not about you Joeinpoole; but would you like to share with us an activity you are particularly proud of?

Oh please dont.

I have no interest in reading about the emotionally and intellectually stunted ramblings of a person with such a rigid perspective of gender stereotypes, spouting off about their vainglorious shitty 'achievements'.

History is full enough of such boring drivel.

Quite frankly, I wish his "type" would just fuck off and die out already.

zanf's picture

posted by zanf [561 posts]
30th August 2014 - 11:58

4 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
themartincox wrote:

And I don't own a pair of testicles, I have them, but me and the bread-knife share everything 50/50!

Yeah right! That says *everything* about you. Obviously you'll be getting sympathetic period-pains every month too. I'm actually quite surprised that you didn't use that as your excuse to quit on the exercise that you couldn't handle. Fortunately the Greek chappy saved you from having to use that one.[/

The really nasty and unwarranted insults you are throwing at a man who has shown such compassion doing an unbelievably tough event he'd trained long and hard for, reveal far more about you than him. The need you demonstrate to belittle others' achievements with quite such vitriol suggests a degree of inadequacy and self loathing for which you should ask for help.

posted by fatsimonstan [36 posts]
30th August 2014 - 12:26

5 Likes

Jesus man, what is wrong with you?

Some bloke called Eddy once told me: "Don't buy upgrages, ride up grades"

spin cycle's picture

posted by spin cycle [56 posts]
1st September 2014 - 17:30

3 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
themartincox wrote:

And I don't own a pair of testicles, I have them, but me and the bread-knife share everything 50/50!

Yeah right! That says *everything* about you. Obviously you'll be getting sympathetic period-pains every month too. I'm actually quite surprised that you didn't use that as your excuse to quit on the exercise that you couldn't handle. Fortunately the Greek chappy saved you from having to use that one.

Jesus man, what is wrong with you?

Some bloke called Eddy once told me: "Don't buy upgrages, ride up grades"

spin cycle's picture

posted by spin cycle [56 posts]
1st September 2014 - 17:33

3 Likes

I've had enough of bullies like Joeinpoole destroying cycling forum's. I've seen one forum recently go down the pan by one or two similar individuals beating their drum in a similar way making others think it is the right behaviour until every post is filled with belligerant posts by people trying to outdo each others narcissism.
Unfortunately we can't "unlike" Joeinpoole or give him an E-Bay-style one star out of five, but we can show that we disagree with his behaviour without dropping to his lowest common denominator or feeding the troll he is.
I suggest everyone who agrees with me just posting "Joeinpoole I disagree with your constant negative posting, please go away"

posted by macrophotofly [38 posts]
2nd September 2014 - 1:27

4 Likes

Joeinpoole wrote:
themartincox wrote:

And I don't own a pair of testicles, I have them, but me and the bread-knife share everything 50/50!

Yeah right! That says *everything* about you. Obviously you'll be getting sympathetic period-pains every month too. I'm actually quite surprised that you didn't use that as your excuse to quit on the exercise that you couldn't handle. Fortunately the Greek chappy saved you from having to use that one.

You really are something special, aren't you Joe? You make scum look good. Remember the old saying your mum taught you - if you can't say something nice, shut the fuck up.

Martin - thanks for sharing your experiences. It has helped me and many others get a feel for a ride that very few of us will ever even contemplate doing. Chapeau.

posted by TimC340 [42 posts]
8th September 2014 - 6:40

1 Like

joeinpoole Angry Sick Silly
martin Applause

posted by paulrbarnard [136 posts]
8th September 2014 - 8:30

0 Likes

Let me add my £0.02 to the steaming pile of opprobrium:

Joeinpoole, you exemplify the quintessential test of a forum like this in a free society: I find your posts on this topic distasteful to the point of needing a quick walk in the sunshine, however I defend to the death your right to make a complete and utter bell-end of yourself.

As many say, cycling is a broad church. There is no such thing as the 'cycling community'. There are as many groups, clubs, cliques, gatherings of opinion, schools of thinking and suchlike as there are people who ride. I no more wish to be lumped in with your line of thinking than to be hog-tied naked inside a dry burlap sack labelled 'IMMIGRANT' with a lobster/badger hybrid creature, in front of a team of Daily Mail readers armed with cans of petrol and a box of matches.

I was told there would be Cake. Luckily there's http://TestValleyCC.org.uk

KiwiMike's picture

posted by KiwiMike [533 posts]
8th September 2014 - 13:42

1 Like

This thread has been going for longer than the race did, and about 10 days longer than my chances Wink

Racer 074 for the 2014 Transcontinental Race; 2,000 miles from London to Istanbul.

http://themartincox.co.uk/2014/03/racer-074-transcontinental-race-2014/

posted by themartincox [366 posts]
8th September 2014 - 13:55

0 Likes

themartincox wrote:
This thread has been going for longer than the race did, and about 10 days longer than my chances Wink

Tells you a lot about the internet really, doesn't it?! Rolling Eyes Thinking

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3327 posts]
8th September 2014 - 15:46

0 Likes