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Dogma at the front, party at the back: Pinarello unveils Dogma X endurance bike with funky new seat stay technology

The new endurance bike is very much a party-at-the-back affair with the new X-STAYS and 35mm tyre clearance

Pinarello has released a new Dogma X endurance road bike, as well as updating its existing X-Series models. Joining the list of major brands that have updated their endurance road bikes in recent weeks, Pinarello has not only released a new Dogma X model, but also three new models in the X-series: the X5, X7, and X9. So we thought we'd take an in-depth look at the venerable Italian company’s latest models and see what they’re all about.

> Read our first ride report here

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Pinarello Dogma X

The flagship bike of this release is certainly the Dogma X, a new endurance bike joining Pinarello's ranks and equipped with some interesting looking X-STAYS technology and 35mm tyre clearance. As you might guess from the naming, this bike is the flagship of the range, sitting parallel to the Italian brand's renowned Dogma F racing bike.

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Aesthetically, the X does bear many similarities to the race-ready machine that the Dogma F is but takes some things towards a more comfort-oriented approach rather than pure speed. As Pinarello puts it, thanks to the Dogma X, “riders are no longer forced to choose between an overly aggressive position, or fitting multiple spacers under their stems, which reduces safety and bike handling in both circumstances."

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Comfort on long rides isn't all about the geometry, either, so Pinarello has widened the tyre clearance of the X to 35mm in partnership with Pirelli and their specific new 35mm tyre. Pinarello says that this greater tyre width yields a massive increase in comfort while noting that there is, as a result, a necessary decrease in aerodynamics; the X is about five percent less aero than the F. The brand new 35mm P-Zero tyre didn't quite make it to production in time for the launch of the bike, so the current stock will come equipped with Continental GP5000 S tyres in 32mm instead.

Beyond the tyres, the most arresting design feature of the Dogma X though is, of course, the seat stay connection to the seat tube in the rear triangle. By doubling the number of attachment points, Pinarello's idea was to dissipate vibration forces to the seat tube, away from the rider’s back.

Additionally, by lengthening the chain stays to accommodate the wider rubber, Pinarello designed the X-STAYS to reinforce lateral stiffness, the boon being this could be done without interfering with vertical compliance. In short, the whole aim of the structure is to provide more side-to-side stiffness without sacrificing comfort, and with no loss of stiffness at the bottom bracket area. 

The other big investment Pinarello has made with the Dogma X comes in the geometry, which has been thoroughly updated. Pinarello believes it's achieved the “best geometry for the consumer”. What this means in practice is a little less reach - 3.9mm less compared to the Dogma F and 15.4mm more stack compared to the F-series.

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And of course, the eye-catching nature of the overall design of the Dogma X is a differentiating factor and by no means an accident. Being a Pinarello, 'asymmetry' is baked into the DNA of every bike, so there’s additional material on the drive side of the frame to cope with the increased torsional forces of the chain.

The X continues Pinarello’s long-time partnership with and use of Toray carbon fibre, and the Dogma X receives their flagship T1100 1K weave. The frame is claimed to weigh 950g, while the fork is 400g.

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Complete Dogma X builds are around 7.5kg depending on finishing kit. At the front end, from the X5 and up, you get Pinarello's (TiCR) integrated cockpit, with its claimed savings of five watts (although they did not share any further details about distance or speed). The front of the Dogma X, essentially, from the seat tube forward, is a Dogma F, but with a slightly greater rake, which is 47mm across all 11 sizes of the Dogma X. 

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The updated X-Series

Tha Dogma X is the flagship for those who want the best of the best endurance road bike, but Pinarello has also updated the Dogma-less X-series which. It introduced this endurance line to the performance road bike range in February and although the X-series looks much like the Dogma X, it has some major differences. 

Now, joining the existing X1 and X3 there are three new models in the X-series: the X5, X7 and X9. These are new designs, with new carbon fibre layups which should yield ‘new behaviour' - the X9 and X7 get the T900 carbon layup (960g frame weight), and the X5 gets T700 (990g frame weight).

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The X-series features the double attachment points at the seat stays, but doesn’t get the X-STAYS. The geometry remains built around 35mm tyres, and the X-series is available in five different builds and colours - although not all are available in the UK market.

Pinarello X-series frame sets also have a 15mm higher stack and 9mm shorter reach compared to the Dogma X. 

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Pinarello Dogma X and X-series - availability and pricing

The Dogma X is available to order now, as a frameset in 11 sizes, and in four complete builds/colours - although not all are available in the UK, including those with SRAM and Campagnolo drivetrains. 

Dogma X with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupset - £13,300
Princeton Carbonworks Grit 5440 wheels
Talon Ultra Light handlebar

Dogma X frameset - £5,500

X7 with Shimano Ultegra Di2 - £7,200
Most Carbon Ultrafast wheels
Talon Ultra Light handlebar

X5 with Shimano 105 Di2 - £5,700
Fulcrum Racing 800 
Alloy two-piece handlebar 

The bikes will also be available in the ‘My Way’ Pinarello platform, allowing riders to
customise the colours. Across the 11 frame sizes, the cockpit will come in 18 size combinations, from 80mm stem/40cm bar, up to 140mm stem and a 44cm bar.

[Image credit Pinarello and Tom Weijand]

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6 comments

Avatar
matthewn5 | 9 months ago
0 likes

Quote:

By doubling the number of attachment points, Pinarello's idea was to dissipate vibration forces to the seat tube, away from the rider’s back.

Complete structural illiteracy, whether from Pinarello or the author of this piece.

More attachment points, and triangulation like this, will increase stiffness and the transmission of vibration forces. But it certainly looks technical. And it reproduces the 'X' logo.

Speaking of which, has Elon seen this?

Avatar
tubasti | 10 months ago
0 likes

What is that mantra? Laterally stiff but vertically compliant? I thought Zertz was the final solution for that.

Avatar
Cugel replied to tubasti | 10 months ago
2 likes

tubasti wrote:

What is that mantra? Laterally stiff but vertically compliant? I thought Zertz was the final solution for that.

You may be confusing (as does the article) "gimmick with unfounded PR claims" for "solution".

There is never a final gimmick as this would put marketing and advertising folk out of their jobs, requiring them to find another job in which lying, exagerating and making-up-stuff are  basic requirements. Perhaps they could all work for Toryspivdom, where these skills are highly valued, nay, essential?

Avatar
KDee | 10 months ago
0 likes

Nearly 6k for 105 Di2 

Avatar
Cugel | 10 months ago
0 likes

Funky seat stays!  Have you considered the etymology of "funky"*? It begs the question: how did them seat stays get funky, eh, eh?

Another set of overpriced and over-hyped bicyles, which seem to be run-of-the-mill + a bit of, er, funker; and the ever so important label to double the price the bike should be. 

No fanks.   1

* There are many; but one modern origin is that associated with "funky music", allied to the older meaning of "having a strong odour". The "funky music" meaning incorporates (!) a meaning of "funky" that refers to a certain strong body odour ..... of a region that would not be far from those seat stays should one gender rather than another be riding the thing!

Wouldn't "gimmicky" be a better adjective? Or "spurious"?

 

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Cugel | 10 months ago
4 likes

Cugel wrote:

Funky seat stays!  Have you considered the etymology of "funky"*? It begs the question: how did them seat stays get funky, eh, eh?

Another set of overpriced and over-hyped bicyles, which seem to be run-of-the-mill + a bit of, er, funker; and the ever so important label to double the price the bike should be. 

No fanks.   1

* There are many; but one modern origin is that associated with "funky music", allied to the older meaning of "having a strong odour". The "funky music" meaning incorporates (!) a meaning of "funky" that refers to a certain strong body odour ..... of a region that would not be far from those seat stays should one gender rather than another be riding the thing!

Wouldn't "gimmicky" be a better adjective? Or "spurious"?

 

To begin this tale of funky freshness, we must travel back to the 14th century, when funk—perhaps curiously—meant “a spark.” This definition grew from the Germanic word fonke of the same meaning.

It was another 400 years before funk developed the (supposedly) completely unrelated sense of “depression or ill-humor”—i.e., “in a funk.”

A slang verb, this sort of funk (or to be funked) first meant “to become afraid, shrink through fear, fail through panic,” a sense that probably draws upon the Flemish fonck (“perturbation, agitation, distress”) and was likely related to Old French funicle (“wild, mad”). The English word quivered its way to noundom in Scotland and Northern England in the 1740s with the same sense—“cowering state of fear”—and then came to convey general grumpiness just a few years later.

Some small, devious part of me wondered if funk in this older sense might have given way to its fragrant definition (“bad smell”) because those who found themselves in a (fearful) funk would shit themselves. But it turns out the aromatic meaning of funk arose from an entirely different origin:

Once upon a time, the French began to perfect the art of turning spoiled milk into delicious gourmet food—i.e., cheese. Lots of cheese. So much cheese, in fact, that there arose a proverb that says there is a different French cheese for every day of the year. French statesman Charles de Gaulle once remarked, “Comment voulez-vous gouverner un pays qui a deux cent quarante-six variétés de fromage?” or “How can you govern a country which has two hundred and forty-six varieties of cheese?”

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