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BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox

9
£610.00

VERDICT:

9
10
Easy to pack and very secure, with the bonus of swallowing front ends fully assembled
Every easy to pack
Holds bike securely
Plenty of room for kit
Easy to wheel through the airport
The base may be too wide for the check-in weighing belt...
Weight: 
13,000g

At road.cc every product is thoroughly tested for as long as it takes to get a proper insight into how well it works. Our reviewers are experienced cyclists that we trust to be objective. While we strive to ensure that opinions expressed are backed up by facts, reviews are by their nature an informed opinion, not a definitive verdict. We don't intentionally try to break anything (except locks) but we do try to look for weak points in any design. The overall score is not just an average of the other scores: it reflects both a product's function and value – with value determined by how a product compares with items of similar spec, quality, and price.

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The BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox is a secure, easy-to-pack thing that's brilliantly thought out. The wide section for handlebars means there's no need to start dismantling your bike, but that extra bulk can cause a few issues with car boots and check-ins.

We got this in for testing around January 2020, but you can probably guess why this review has been delayed...

Nearly two years later the world is absolutely fine (terms and conditions apply), so I was very happy to jet off to the south of France for a week with a brand new Merida Scultura Team E. I know, I know; it's still a bit of a chore, but please don't feel sorry for me.

> Buy this online here

The Team E was wearing the new Shimano Dura-Ace R9200 groupset, and with the price of the whole lot easily spilling into five figures, I thought some serious protection would be a sensible idea.

The Triathlon Aero Easyfit immediately has a significant advantage over other boxes, because it doesn't require you to remove your handlebar. That's not just a good feature for those who are picky about position, it's also nice not to be wrestling with an integrated front end – something we commonly see on road race bikes these days.

To get the 54cm Merida into the box, I had to remove the wheels and pedals. That was it. The wheels go into clearly-labelled slots and are held by Velcro straps. I thought it would be a little flimsy, but soon realised the wheels weren't going anywhere.

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - fitting instructions.jpg

Next, you angle the bars into the big space at the bottom corner and secure the frame with yet more Velcro straps. Again I was impressed by how firmly everything was held in place.

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - inside 2.jpg

Foam cutouts separate the wheels from the frame to prevent scratching, and an anti-crush bar forms once the box is closed.

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - foam padding 2.jpg

There is plenty of space left for spare kit, tools and even a track pump. You just need to wrap and wedge everything carefully. Your pedals can be secured with dedicated straps too, though I prefer to carry mine in hand luggage with my shoes. It just makes hiring a bike a bit easier, should the airline misplace your own. Your own, ten grand bike...

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - handle.jpg

Wheeling the box from carpark to airport through check-in proves a doddle. Even the tight turns of the rat-in-a-maze queues presented no issues thanks to the steerable wheels at the front.

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - wheel 2 swivel.jpg

The only issue I can see is with the width of the base. Where I was, the base wouldn't fit on the weighing belt at check-in. It wasn't an issue this time – my box supposedly weighed just 8kg – but I can envisage a scenario where a jobsworth gets funny about not being able to weigh it perfectly accurately. And by jobsworth I mean 'person responsible for stopping your overweight plane plunging into a field.'

Still, you could always turn it upside down and stand it on the narrower edge (the box, not the jobsworth).

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - side clip.jpg

The wide base was also behind some gentle(ish) ramming of the box into a Peugeot hire car, but I'll happily blame the designer of the wavy Peugeot boot for this one. The box is fastened by a number of clasps, and they can be locked into place with a small combination lock if you're nervous about them popping open.

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - top clip 1.jpg

At the other end, the lack of assembly means that you can crack a beer, order a pizza/fire up the BBQ and get your bike built within minutes. Just remember to use pad spacers if you've got disc brakes.

2021 BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox - fixings 1.jpg

At £610, the Aero Easyfit is a bit of an investment, but the ease of use and its sheer sturdiness make it a potentially very good one, especially if you have a high-value bike. The lack of damage from this flight suggests it'll last for years, too.

> The stuff they never tell you about flying with your bike

If you don't need to keep your front end assembled, you can save a bit of cash with a standard BikeBox Alan at £438, while Douchebags' The Savage is very secure and easier to store on account of being a bag. It's now called The Djärv and, at £519, is actually £106 cheaper than it was when we reviewed it in 2019.

The most affordable option we've tested recently is the Merlin Cycles Elite Travel Bike Bag at £380, though it is pretty much on a constant discount which takes it down to £199.

Conclusion

Appropriately, the Easyfit is one of the easiest bike flight cases I've had the pleasure of packing. Its design is a little bulkier than others, but the benefits of not having to pull apart the front end of your bike are very welcome. If you've got the cash and want an easy life, this is a brilliant choice.

Verdict

Easy to pack and very secure, with the bonus of swallowing front ends fully assembled

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: BikeBox Alan Triathlon Aero Easyfit Bikebox

Size tested: n/a

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

From BikeBox Alan: "The Triathlon Aero Easyfit is the latest addition to the Bike box Alan Range. The Easyfit is the biggest Bike box available anywhere, so it should be no surprise that all Triathlon and Road bikes fit, with plenty of space for Wet suits, shoes and Kit.

As you might expect, the Easyfit inherits the same DNA as its Multi award winning Bike Box Alan cousin, the Premium.

If you have a Triathlon Bike or the latest generation of Aero road bikes with or without hydraulic disc brakes, generally all you only need to remove, is the wheels and pedals! *

So if the TT handlebar or Road handlebar assembly can't be dismantled. Or if you simply want the absolute minimum of component removal, this is the bike box for you.

Precious handlebar and seat settings can remain. Even hydration systems can generally stay in place. Packing can be achieved in as little as 5 Minutes!

The Easyfit is also designed for regular Road bikes, the larger ENDURO Mountain Bikes, Gravel, and Cyclocross bikes, plus some types of Touring bikes"

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Approx 13 kg

Dimensions: approx. L 133cm x H 94cm x W50cm

7 Years Warranty

1 x Anti crush pole (stays in place if TSA Security open the bike box)

Black Clasps

Includes 2 layers of foam padding

Spacious interior

Registered design

Cushioned Black Velcro securing straps

Only takes a few minutes to pack

Custom graphics available

Minimal dismantling - Only requires wheels pedals removing, in rare instances Rear mech (1 Allen key bolt)*

Designed to accommodate the latest generation of High end Triathlon, TT, Aero bikes, large frames, 29er MTB, 26B plus sized Mountain bikes, Tri bars and bikes with fully integrated cabling

Tubeless Road and MTB tyres can remain inflated

Also suits Regular Road and Triathlon Bikes

3 lightweight wheels fit inside

Solid Disc wheels fit - optional free solid disc wheel anti-crush pole available upon request.

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
9/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
10/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
9/10
Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
7/10
Rate the product for value:
 
5/10

This earns its reasonably high price tag.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Very well. It protected a very expensive bike on my holiday.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Not having to take the front end off the bike.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The width of the base can make it hard to get on the check-in scales.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

It is up there at the higher end, but this isn't the most that you can spend on a bike box.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

Dead easy to pack, with the benefit of not having to take the bars off. The box is secure and protects its contents well.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 27  Height: 177cm  Weight: 62kg

I usually ride: Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL7  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: Under 5 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo cross, commuting, club rides, general fitness riding, I specialise in the Cafe Ride!

Son of a Marathon runner, Nephew of a National 24hr Champion, the racing genetics have completely passed him by. After joining the road.cc staff in 2016 as a reviewer, Liam quickly started writing feature articles and news pieces. After a little time living in Canada, where he spent most of his time eating poutine, Liam returned with the launch of DealClincher, taking over the Editor role at the start of 2018. At the weekend, Liam can be found racing on the road both in the UK and abroad, though he prefers the muddy fields of cyclocross. To date, his biggest race win is to the front of the cafe queue.

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