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Verdict: 
Solid wheels that offer plenty of performance but at a fairly hefty price
Weight: 
1,650g
Miche Syntium DX Disc Wheels
7 10

Miche creates components in certain ranges, with Syntium – which these DX Disc Wheels are part of – sitting at the upper end of the catalogue, hence the £459.99 price tag. They are the Italian company's flagship aluminium disc wheelset and they're solid all-rounders, offering strong build quality with an acceptable weight, but they do look pricey compared with the competition.

  • Pros: Well built, stiff
  • Cons: Pricey against some of the competition, narrow rim width won't suit those who like to run wider tyres

At 1,650g on the road.cc Scales of Truth, these aren't the lightest wheels we've tested at this price point, but out on the road they feel responsive when you accelerate or start ascending a steep climb. The pawl engagement inside the freehub is rapid, too, so drive is engaged instantly, which you notice after track standing at the lights or in a line of traffic.

> Find your nearest dealer here

Miche aims the Syntiums at racing or endurance, and these characteristics help to give you what is basically a very quick set of wheels that are fun to ride.

Rim width is quite narrow for what is a pretty new wheel design, measuring just 20mm across the outer faces with an internal width of just 15mm. Hunt's 4 Season wheels, for example, are 24mm outer and 19mm inner. A lot of riders are going with tyres of 28mm plus for road use, and a wider rim bed works better with these, giving a smooth transition from wheel and tyre. They can often stretch the tyre's width out a touch too.

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - rim bed.jpg

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - rim bed.jpg

The Syntiums worked fine with both 25mm and 28mm tyres (the website actually states 23mm to 28mm), and I'd say that is plenty wide enough given their speedy performance criteria, although you may prefer wider.

The rims have quite a boxy profile and are just 24mm deep, so if you want aerodynamic assistance, look elsewhere. Both front and rear use an offset rim bed to even out the dishing angle of the spokes on each side of the wheel.

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - spoke.jpg

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - spoke.jpg

Ever deeper cassettes have really reduced the angle of the spokes from hub to rim so they are virtually vertical compared to that of the non-drive side, so by offsetting where the spokes sit on the rim you can increase the angle to create a stronger wheel.

It's similar on the front wheel, but to offset that of the brake rotor side of the hub.

The Syntiums use 24 spokes front and rear with a radial/two-cross setup and that is pretty much the norm on wheels of this type.

The spoke tension feels tight throughout and this is a very stiff set of wheels – out-of-the-saddle efforts didn't show up any lateral flex.

The hubs run smoothly, especially once they've bedded in, and you get a reassuring click from the freehub when you let the bike roll. Any play can be adjusted on the rear hub by way of the adjustment collar. The only downside to this is that its outer diameter makes it impossible to fit a standard lockring to the Centerlock rotor mount. You'll need to get something like Shimano's SM-HB20 lockring, which instead of having the teeth on the inside has them on the outside and is tightened using Shimano's bottom bracket tool. It's a bit of a faff, and they cost about a tenner each.

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - rear hub.jpg

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - rear hub.jpg

You can get the Syntiums in either a Shimano/SRAM fitment or Campagnolo.

Both the front and rear come set up for 12mm thru-axles, although our wheels here have the optional quick release adaptor fitted to the rear wheel, which will work for a few bikes, as we see quite a few that are running QRs at the rear with thru-axles up at the front.

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - front hub.jpg

Miche Syntium AXY Disc Black Wheels - front hub.jpg

Tyres fitted fine with no need to apply anything more than thumb pressure, and rim tapes are included. If you want to go tubeless you'll need to add a proper tape to seal the bed.

When it comes to value, you can't talk about price of a good quality alloy rimmed disc wheel without mentioning Hunt. Its wheels offer decent weights, great build quality and impressive pricing.

Hunt's 4 Season Aeros are slightly deeper rimmed at 27mm and, as I mentioned earlier, are 24mm wide yet they still manage to be around 80g lighter but, more importantly, are £140 cheaper.

> Buyer's Guide: 26 of the best road bike wheels

The similar weight Fulcrum Racing 5 DB wheelset is more expensive than the Hunt set but is still £110 cheaper than the Miche pair.

It's this pricing that I'd say is the real thorn in the Syntiums' side as they are very good wheels. Performance is great, reliability feels top notch and they are really well put together so you are getting what you are paying for, but there are cheaper options out there.

Verdict

Solid wheels that offer plenty of performance but at a fairly hefty price

road.cc test report

Make and model: Miche Syntium DX Disc Wheels

Size tested: Compatibility: Shimano/Sram 11/10x

Tell us what the wheel is for

Miche says, "The renewed collection of Syntium wheels is Miche's aluminum rim flagship, designed and built to ensure excellent performance in any occasion, on any type of course. The newly designed Ergal hubs, assembled with AL7075-T6 freehub body and high-performance bearings, guarantee excellent smoothness and reliability. The light weight and the great reactivity make these wheels ideal for mixed routes and long climbs."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the wheel?

From Miche:

HUBS

Front and rear body AL 6061 T6

Axle material AL 7075 T6

Bearings MICHE

Adjustment system smoothness adjustment ring

Disc fixing system center lock licensed by Shimano

optional ISO 6 holes with adaptors

Freewheel body AL 7075 T6

Compatibility Shimano, Sram 11/10 speeds

O.L.D. 100mm / 135-142mm

QR type standard TX12/TX12

optional QR/QR

RIM

Material lightweight alloy

Front rim height 24 mm asymmetric

Rear rim height 24 mm asymmetric

Dimension ETRTO 622-15C

Width outer 20 mm

inner 15 mm

Valve hole diameter 6,5mm

Tire clincher

(23mm ÷ 28mm)

SPOKES

Material Aisi 302 stainless steel (Sapim)

Shape straight-pull, flat, double butted

Nipples AL 7075 T6 (Sapim)

Spokes number 16+8 front and 16+8 rear

Spokes pattern front radial drive side, crossed x2 non drive side, rear radial non drive side, crossed x2 drive side

Rate the wheel for quality of construction:
 
8/10
Rate the wheel for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the wheel for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the wheel for weight
 
7/10
Rate the wheel for value:
 
4/10

Did the wheels stay true? Any issues with spoke tension?

Yes, straight and true with very consistent spoke tension.

How easy did you find it to fit tyres?

No issues at all.

How did the wheel extras (eg skewers and rim tape) perform?

The rim tapes fitted snuggly and didn't move.

Tell us how the wheel performed overall when used for its designed purpose

For general road use the DXs are quality performers on a range of terrain.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the wheel

Stiffness is impressive.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the wheel

It's a bit pricey.

Did you enjoy using the wheel? Yes

Would you consider buying the wheel? It depends on the price...

Would you recommend the wheel to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

The Syntiums are a quality set of wheels in every aspect but at over £100 more expensive than some decent competition they lose a point for value.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 39  Height: 180cm  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: This month's test bike  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 10-20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, fixed/singlespeed

Stu knocked out his first road.cc review back in 2009 and since then he's chucked the best part of seventy test bikes around the West Country, a couple of them quite literally! With three alloy and two steel bikes in his fleet he's definitely a metal man (that'll be the engineering background) but is slowly warming to that modern carbon fibre stuff along with fat tyres & disc brakes.
It's not all nostalgia though, after spending the last few years in product design Stu keeps banging on about how 3D printing is going to be the next big thing and he's a sucker for a beautiful paint job too.

3 comments

Avatar
Vejnemojnen [287 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

so, compared to a Hunt disc wheelset, it is:

 

1. expensive

2. narrow and heavy

3. most likely subpar quality (as everything with the brand "miche" printed on it..)

 

a pure bargain..

Avatar
vonhelmet [939 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I don’t know, some miche hubs are pretty solid... That being said, for my money I’d stuck with the hubs and get something hand built with wider rims as you suggest.

Avatar
fukawitribe [2500 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
vonhelmet wrote:

I don’t know, some miche hubs are pretty solid...

Yep, Miche Primato hubs seem a decent punt and recommended by a few wheel-builders i've looked at - well priced, good reputation, alright bearings and easy to strip.