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Mason Definition road bike

9
£3,695.00

VERDICT:

9
10
Production bike with bespoke feel and wonderful, inspiring, addictive ride
Weight: 
0g

At road.cc every product is thoroughly tested for as long as it takes to get a proper insight into how well it works. Our reviewers are experienced cyclists that we trust to be objective. While we strive to ensure that opinions expressed are backed up by facts, reviews are by their nature an informed opinion, not a definitive verdict. We don't intentionally try to break anything (except locks) but we do try to look for weak points in any design. The overall score is not just an average of the other scores: it reflects both a product's function and value – with value determined by how a product compares with items of similar spec, quality, and price.

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Brighton based Mason Cycles has let us loose with one half of its initial line up, the Definition. It's a four season long distance machine with the manners of a tourer and the temperament of race bike.

It's good. So bloody good it's been difficult trying to get into words just how a handful of alloy sticks welded together can leave you feeling so excited. You don't get a ride governed by angles and dimensions here; the Definition seems to mutate as the speed/gradient/direction changes leaving you wondering if you are still riding the same bike you were five minutes ago.

Sorted geometry equals sublime handling

With a wheelbase of 1010mm, room for full mudguards with 28mm tyres and a relaxed looking front end you'd be excused for thinking the Definition is some sort of audax-style winter trainer. What you get though is a frame that's mild mannered and easy to ride whether it's doing 16 or 60mph (okay 56.9mph, bloody HGV limiters) in the wet or dry.

The key to a good mile muncher is that you don't notice it. If you've tapped out a steady hundred miles and not once thought about the bike it's doing its job. The Definition can do this, miles and miles can go by and the bike will just roll on with little input through the steering.

But we all need a little bit of excitement in our lives and when you give the pedals a kick those Dedacciai tubes deliver a ride to challenge most race bikes.

As the bends start to tighten and the speed increases the tapered head tube and steerer combination comes into its own giving a sharpness and directness to the steering. Handling like its on rails may be a cliché but is totally apt here; point the handlebars at the line you want and the Definition nails it without compromise.

The bottom bracket height has been dropped a touch to counteract the larger volume tyres and alongside that meter long wheelbase the whole bike remains stable at high speed or under heavy braking. A rough road surface won't upset it either.

I thought I'd over-cooked it a couple of times entering roundabouts or bends on a country lane but the Definition just keeps leaning and holding that tight line. A squeeze of the hydraulic disc brakes just tightens the arc a touch if you need to without an unwelcome shift of body weight.

Long rides often see you travelling unfamiliar roads. The knowledge and confidence that the bike will get you out of a tricky situation is a nice feeling to have especially if the fatigue is kicking in and increasing the chances of you making a mistake.

It's not just how precisely it responds in the bends that makes the Definition so rewarding to ride, it's the fact that you can ride it however you are feeling at that particular time. Go steady or go eyeballs out and you'll get the same level of feedback and control.

The Aperture fork is designed specifically for Mason's two bikes, the Definition and the Resolution, and it's a beauty. The carbon layup means you get no chatter from the road surface even at extreme lean angles, despite the stiffness of the legs. It also provides perfect resistance to massive braking efforts.

Stiffness without harshness

Aluminium alloy frames have always had a reputation for being harsh but alloy tubing has had some real investment and technological advances over the last few years. Those tubes build into creating stiff frames without the bone shaking characteristics.

The Dedacciai tube set used on the Definition is testament to this, offering a beautifully smooth ride that shows hints of an almost steel like softness while retaining the stiff undertones of the 7000 series, T6 heat treated alloy.

Mason Cycles' eponymous designer and head honcho Dom Mason handpicked the tube set himself rather than just use an off the shelf selection to create the exact ride feel he was after both in terms of performance and comfort. As with the handling, this is apparent when the bike is being ridden at differing efforts.

Spinning it along easily it rides through the bumps absorbing the majority of the road buzz even with the tyres pumped up to 120psi. You can feel the stiffness of the frame through the pedals being linked to the meaty bottom bracket junction but up near your hands, at the top tube/head tube junction, things are a lot calmer. The feel is ever so slightly different, softer even.

The seatstays are curved which tames the rear end under hard acceleration and dulls the resonation of the road travelling up to the rider before it can reach the saddle.

When the red mist descends though the whole bike again feels like it transforms into a tighter, more nimble beast. The power goes through the down tube and bottom bracket without any feeling of loss as the Definition surges forward. It's not exactly a sprinter but the change of pace is instant and above all addictive, like it's goading you to push that little bit harder than you really need to.

This is true as well when you are in the hills. That bottom bracket area makes sure all of your effort goes to the rear wheel whether you're climbing seated or honking hard on the bars for the really steep bits. At 8.6kg (18.95lb) for this build the Definition climbs well. The Mason x Hunt 4Season wheels' low weight is really noticeable here compared to other disc wheels currently available.

On a 200km ride to Brighton to drop the Definition back to Mason HQ I stepped off the bike without a single ache or pain. Arms, wrists and neck are the usual places I suffer once I get past four or five hours on a stiff bike, but those aches and pains didn't appear. In fact I was fresh enough to ride back the next day on the steel Resolution.

Attention to detail

I'd still be a bike fanatic even if I didn't cycle. I just love the way a road bike looks especially metal ones with tubes and things which is why the Definition gives me such a buzz.

The curved seat and chain stays are a work of art as well as being functional. The longer wheelbase allows for plenty of heel clearance on the chain stays too considering the extra width of a disc hub.

The quality of the finish on the Definition is second to none, from the welding through to the paint and decals. To achieve this Mason has the frames shipped around Italy to the companies he has handpicked for the quality of their work. The photos just can't do the finish justice; it really needs to be seen in the flesh and preferably in the sun.

The welding is neat and tidy and thankfully left in its raw state. I prefer to see the joins rather than sanded for a smooth finish, it keeps the bike's engineered look and means there is no chance of the tube wall thickness being reduced through over-zealous sanding.

Mason offers a five year guarantee on the frame and fork plus two years on Mason components; that's an impressive testament to his confidence in its quality.

It's the little details that bring a completeness to the frame though, things like the MultiPort system that allows you use various nodules and blanking plates depending on which groupset you are running internally through the frame – electronic or mechanical. The positioning of these entry and exit points provide smooth cable rums for unrestricted shifting quality if you are running cables, removing tight bends and keeping things close to the frame and avoiding moisture collecting sumps. The MultiPorts used on the 48mm diameter downtube are staggered to create this kind of detail.

Continuing this tidy run is the unique thruBB bottom bracket shell which is oversized at 50mm diameter before stepping down to accept standard threaded BB cups. This allows clearance to run the cables and brake hose through the BB shell without the risk of pinching or restricting function plus a larger surface area for welding.

As I mentioned above the Definition frame is fully equipped with bosses for full mudguards and a rear rack and a few more discretely situated on the wheel side of the seatstays for tidy cable routing. Fittings are positioned underneath the redundant rear brake bridge and on the chain stay bridge too.

This level of detailing continues to the fork as well. Like I said earlier the fork has been completely designed by Mason to work with this frame. Perfecting the height, clearance and ride quality has allowed him to refine everything else too, like the internal cable/hose routing for the disc caliper and placing the mudguard bosses on the inside of the fork legs for a minimal look. The Aperture has traditional dropouts rather than a thru axle which is a sensible option at the moment while (if) the industry decides on a standard.

The full carbon steerer has an even taper, unlike some that are just straight down to a small section of larger diameter at the bottom. The Aperture steerer therefore has a larger surface area for stiffness.

Well specced finishing kit

The Definition is available in four build options plus a special order Dura-Ace Di2 so the Ultegra Di2 version we've got is the top off the shelf spec. You get the new hydro shifters to work with the Shimano hydraulic disc brakes and it's a match made in heaven. Being able to brake and change gear at the same time in total control is a massive confidence booster and you don't realise how much of a benefit it is until you switch back to mechanical.

It's a full groupset too with chainset and both mechs adding to that complete look you get when all of the components match. The shifting on Di2 has got much smoother over time and although the front mech is still on the large side the rear looks very little different from the mechanical version.

The braking from the latest generation Shimano hydraulics is phenomenal. The control from the levers is class-leading and while you can easily lock the rear wheel you soon get used to how much power you need to use.

The style of the braking perfectly matches the mannerisms of the Definition, aggressive and pin point accuracy when you want it, gentle inputs when you don't.

Running with the Italian theme the headset, handlebars and stem are all Deda items. The spec level increases with the build option/groupset you go for and on our model the upper level alloy components of the range suit the frame perfectly. They are stiff but thanks to slight shock absorbance of the frame not overly so.

The majority of the Deda bars have a shallow drop these days so they suit a larger selection of hand sizes and are very comfortable to ride. Descending in the drops is a real pleasure, being able to spread your weight out over the bike.

All the bikes and frames are shipped with a Mason seatpost made from UD carbon fibre. It's 27.2mm in diameter to allow some flex between frame and saddle. It's easy to set up for fore and aft or levelling the saddle.

Fabric provides both the saddle and bar tape and they're really good stuff. The Scoop saddle has a decent mix of stiffness and padding and is very supportive over long distances. The bike swap weekend I put in over fifteen hours on the bike and while I knew I'd done a big weekend I suffered no numbness or chafing at all from the saddle.

The tape is wipe clean which is a really huge bonus if you're running white like our test model was, that'll save you a few quid over the course of the year. The rubbery feel gives plenty of grip and a reasonable amount of padding though I did get the odd tingly finger if I wasn't wearing gloves.

Wheely, wheely good

Mason have gone down a collaboration route for the wheelset on the Definition with fledgling brand Hunt to create the 4seasons, and attention to detail is the defining factor here too.

The 27mm deep rims use a 23mm wide rim (17mm internal) which suits the profile of the 28mm wide Continental Grand Prix All Season tyres perfectly. The width increases grip and ride quality, and gives a little bit in the way of an aerodynamic boost too. They are tubeless ready if that takes your fancy.

They use a quality selection of components from the likes of EZO bearings from Japan and Pillar spokes with reinforced heads. This allows for a strong wheelset to be handbuilt without a weight penalty, they are a claimed 1585g. They roll smoothly and stayed true throughout the test period and are continuing to on the Resolution review bike so longevity isn't going to be an issue.

Additions like stainless hardwear on the skewers is a decent insight especially for a bike that is likely to be used in all weathers.

They are priced at £349 so absorb a decent chunk of the budget but it's where you want your money to go. We see lots of bikes of similar prices being let down by low-priced heavyweight wheels.

The Conti tyres offer really decent grip especially in the dry. They are surefooted and thanks to the profile allowed by the wheels you can really bank them over in the bends. Their resistance to cuts and punctures is second to none as well.

Defining the Definition

You can probably tell by the length of the review that the Mason Definition has tremendous depth to it with regards to the ride, the overall finish and detailing. It's a production bike but with that kind of custom finish to it.

The ride is amazing, pure and simple. The tubes, the geometry, the finishing kit all come together to create a package that is hard to fault. The way it seems to come alive as you put more and more effort into becomes like a drug to the point where I was rarely taking it steady anymore. I needed that hit.

The finish and the way it looks on the road just adds to the pleasure. I love the way the Mason logo faces you on the down tube and I think it tops the table with regards to head tube badges.

Overall the Definition manages to be an all-rounder without displaying any compromises.

Full details of specs and geometry can be found on www.masoncycles.cc

Verdict

Production bike with bespoke feel and wonderful, inspiring, addictive ride

road.cc test report

Make and model: Mason Definition

Size tested: 54

About the bike

State the frame and fork material and method of construction. List the components used to build up the bike.

Frame: Dedacciai 7000 T6 series aluminium alloy

Fork: Full carbon disk, tapered steerer

Headset: FSA Tapered

Handlebars: Deda

Stem: Deda

Seatpost: Mason carbon fibre

Saddle: Fabric Scoop

Shifters: Shimano R785 Di2 11spd Hydraulic

Chainset: Shimano Ultegra 50-34

Front Mech: Shimano Ultegra Di2

Rear Mech: Shimano Ultegra Di2

Brakeset: Shimano BR-R785 Hydraulic (140mm Rotors)

Wheelset: Mason x Hunt 4Season

Tyres: Continental 4 Season 700x28

Tell us what the bike is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about the bike?

The Definition is described by Mason as a long distance machine that still delivers a quick and entertaining ride with the added benefit of being able to take guards. I think the Definition delivers exactly that.

Frame and fork

Overall rating for frame and fork
 
10/10

Tell us about the build quality and finish of the frame and fork?

The attention to detail, the finish, the welding - there isn't a fault to be found anywhere on the frame or fork. A lot of thought has gone into the frame, that is evident just by spending five minutes looking it over.

Tell us about the materials used in the frame and fork?

The frameset is handbuilt in Italy out of Dedacciai's 7000 series alloy which has been heat-treated to T6 grade for added strength. The tubing is triple butted for weight saving and ride quality.

The fork is made in Taiwan and designed by Mason. It includes a full carbon tapered steerer and internal hose/cable routing for the disc brakes.

Tell us about the geometry of the frame and fork?

At first glance the front end looks very relaxed with the 71.5 degree head angle but as a complete package the Definition delivers on stability and precision.

Full details here - www.masoncycles.cc

How was the bike in terms of height and reach? How did it compare to other bikes of the same stated size?

Mason says that he's concentrated on height and reach rather than just tube lengths to deliver a better geometry. The height of 565.3mm and reach of 388.3 on our 54cm test frame provided a very comfortable position being just stretched out enough to get a decent 'fast' tuck for plenty of miles pain free.

Riding the bike

Was the bike comfortable to ride? Tell us how you felt about the ride quality.

Yes, the Dedacciai tubing doesn't suffer from harshness at all making the Definition a pleasure to ride for long distances.

Did the bike feel stiff in the right places? Did any part of the bike feel too stiff or too flexible?

It is a very good balance, stiffness around the BB is very high with other places on the frame allowing some give to maintain comfort.

How did the bike transfer power? Did it feel efficient?

Very well, the Definition seems to enjoy being pushed hard and delivers power straight to the road.

Was there any toe-clip overlap with the front wheel? If so, was it a problem?

No, it shouldn't be an issue with guards either. The geometry is designed to eliminate this.

How would you describe the steering? Was it lively, neutral or unresponsive? Neutral handling for those long miles though lively enough to excite in the bends.

Tell us some more about the handling. How did the bike feel overall? Did it do particular things well or badly?

The front end geometry and long wheelbase means the Definition is very stable and holds a line very well indeed.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's comfort? would you recommend any changes?

The Fabric Scoop saddle is very pleasurable and feels worn in straight away. Being able to use large volume tubeless tyres means you can drop the pressure for added comfort too.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's stiffness? would you recommend any changes?

Deda's alloy bar and stem combos have always been stiff and nothing changes here.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's efficiency? would you recommend any changes?

The Hunt wheels are light for disc wheels and really bring a lot to the overall ride. I've ridden plenty of big money disc equipped bikes that are let down by cheap, heavy wheels so it's good to not see that happening here.

Rate the bike for efficiency of power transfer:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for acceleration:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for sprinting:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for high speed stability:
 
10/10
Rate the bike for cruising speed stability:
 
10/10
Rate the bike for low speed stability:
 
10/10
Rate the bike for flat cornering:
 
10/10
Rate the bike for cornering on descents:
 
10/10
Rate the bike for climbing:
 
8/10

The drivetrain

Rate the drivetrain for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the drivetrain for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the drivetrain for weight:
 
8/10
Rate the drivetrain for value:
 
8/10

Tell us some more about the drivetrain. Anything you particularly did or didn't like? Any components which didn't work well together?

The Ultegra/hydro set up used on our test bike is lovely. The shifting has got better compared to the first generations but best of all is how well the shifters work with the hydraulic brakes, being able to brake late and change gears at the same time is great on unfamiliar roads.

Wheels and tyres

Rate the wheels and tyres for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for durability:
 
9/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for weight:
 
9/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for comfort:
 
8/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for value:
 
9/10

Tell us some more about the wheels and tyres.Did they work well in the conditions you encountered? Would you change the wheels or tyres? If so, what for?

The Mason x Hunt wheels are befitting of the bike. The finish and build quality is top notch plus using quality components means weight can be trimmed without affecting durability.

Controls

Rate the controls for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for weight:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for comfort:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for value:
 
9/10

Tell us some more about the controls. Any particularly good or bad components? How would the controls work for larger or smaller riders?

The compact Deda bars provide plenty of positions and are stiff enough for high speed direction changes while providing a decent level of comfort.

Anything else you want to say about the componentry? Comment on any other components (good or bad)

The new Fabric range seems to be delivering performance on a sensible budget and if the Scoop is anything to go by we should be seeing a lot more of them. Their bar tape is comfortable and properly wipe clean, ideal for white tape lovers.

Your summary

Did you enjoy riding the bike? Yes.

Would you consider buying the bike? Yes.

Would you recommend the bike to a friend? Yes.

Rate the bike overall for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the bike overall for value:
 
9/10

Anything further to say about the bike in conclusion?

The Definition sums up to me exactly what I think cycling is all about. It's not just about price, weight or components, it's about the whole package. Delivering a ride that thrills though relaxes too and every time you look down and see that deep paintjob in the sun it makes you glad you went out. It makes you feel special like you haven't got a care in the world.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 36  Height: 180cm  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: Kinesis T2  My best bike is: Kinesis Aithien

I've been riding for: 10-20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, fixed/singlespeed,

 

As part of the tech team here at F-At Digital, senior product reviewer Stu spends the majority of his time writing in-depth reviews for road.cc, off-road.cc and ebiketips using the knowledge gained from testing over 1,500 pieces of kit (plus 100's of bikes) since starting out as a freelancer back in 2009. After first throwing his leg over a race bike back in 2000, Stu's ridden more than 170,000 miles on road, time-trial, track, and gravel bikes, and while he's put his racing days behind him, he still likes to smash the pedals rather than take things easy. With a background in design and engineering, he has an obsession with how things are developed and manufactured, has a borderline fetish for handbuilt metal frames and finds a rim braked road bike very aesthetically pleasing!

Add new comment

68 comments

Avatar
rjfrussell | 9 years ago
0 likes

how do the wheels compare to the Kinesis Crosslights? Seem to be very similar weight?

Avatar
userfriendly | 9 years ago
0 likes

Moved comment to correct thread:

Heads up for anyone planning to fit a Campagnolo BB & crankset: due to running full length housing for rear brake & derailleur through the bottom bracket shell as instructed I found that the cable outers were rubbing on the spindle - which had a slight braking effect on the cranks as well as the rather terrifying prospect of the cable outers being worn down to the inner over time.

This obviously is not a problem when fitting a Shimano Hollowtech BB, since they come with a plastic centre sleeve, but that is not the case with Campagnolo BB cups.

In order to avoid this, I checked whether the centre sleeve from an old FSA MegaExo BB I had lying about would fit between the cups, and surprisingly it did. That sleeve is now doing a fine job of keeping the outers at bay and the spindle can spin freely.

I reckon a Shimano centre sleeve might work just as well.

Update - this solution seems to meet Dom's approval, at least for the time being:

Dom wrote:

Your solution sounds like a good one, it should work fine and thanks for suggesting it. A sleeved BB is needed for the Definition but not the Resolution [I think you posted the fix on the Resolution page]. I'll have a look at designing an adapter for sleeveless BB's and let you have one to test.

Avatar
userfriendly | 9 years ago
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Oh aye, I didn't mean to say their builds are overpriced, not at all - just saying that if you like to do your own builds and shop around a bit you'll be able to build to your own budget and taste.

My build consists of the Definition frameset, a Campagnolo Chorus groupset sans brake callipers, chain & cassette - replaced with TRP Spyre SLC, KMC chain & Shimano cassette, respectively - plus some lightweight carbon bits, and it's sitting comfortably at 2.8 grand and pretty much exactly 8 kilograms.

Doing my own builds is part of the appeal to me, if that's not your thing you can't really go wrong with getting a pre-built Mason.

Either way, there really isn't any reason to complain. Decent frames for a decent price. What's not to like?

Avatar
acjim | 6 years ago
0 likes

Is it possible to replace 2 bikes with one of these?

I've currently got a Pinnacle Arkose for commuting and winter miles and a Genesis Zero for summer fun, and going fast on.

I'm thinking I could get a frame and use the parts (with some nice new wheels from Hunt) and slim down the family bike collection a little, but would the winter miles just destroy the bike? The Arkose seems to get through the winter without much complaint if I rinse it off and keep the drivetrain in reasonable order.

How much does it weigh in summer mode? Slim tires and no guards etc..

Avatar
Dr_Lex replied to userfriendly | 9 years ago
0 likes
userfriendly wrote:

Oh aye, I didn't mean to say their builds are overpriced, not at all - just saying that if you like to do your own builds and shop around a bit you'll be able to build to your own budget and taste.

[...]

Either way, there really isn't any reason to complain. Decent frames for a decent price. What's not to like?

Agreed; sorry to have misinterpreted your comment.

C'mon, Dom- frame like a Fat Stoater, please!

Avatar
userfriendly replied to userfriendly | 8 years ago
0 likes
Dom wrote:

Your solution sounds like a good one, it should work fine and thanks for suggesting it. A sleeved BB is needed for the Definition but not the Resolution [I think you posted the fix on the Resolution page]. I'll have a look at designing an adapter for sleeveless BB's and let you have one to test.

I'm about to redo the cabling on my build (already, I know). I didn't quite get it right the first time, and the colour of the outers doesn't quite fit after all.

I'll be fine using the FSA sleeve again, but was wondering what you had in mind for a proper adapter. Any news on this?  1

Avatar
userfriendly | 9 years ago
0 likes

That's without headset and clamp, but do keep in mind that it may simply be my scales that are off the mark, not Dom's. I used cheap kitchen scales which might not be all that accurate on anything in the 4 digit grams range.

Avatar
rmacneil | 9 years ago
0 likes
Quote:

Cause if excluded that would be rather heavy, 1226 grams would be pretty light.

I take it that includes the headset and seatpost clamp,otherwise the weights given by Dom Mason in the comments on the pricing and geometry article are a bit off the mark?

Avatar
userfriendly | 9 years ago
0 likes

Received my Definition frame today. Very well packed with lots of cosy fluffy stuff to keep it safe during transport.

The finish is very beautiful indeed. Can't wait to build it up (but have to wait for the wheels). According to my scales of semi-truth, the frame (in size 54) weighs 1663 grams and the fork 437 grams (with steerer yet to be cut).

In response to the points made above, if the price for a built-up bike seems excessive to you, just get the frame set to build it up yourself. I mostly did that because they're not (yet) offered as Campagnolo builds, but I reckon if you're hell-bent on saving money it's a good way to do that too. For what these frames are the prices are very competitive in my opinion.

Avatar
tigrolino22 replied to userfriendly | 9 years ago
0 likes
userfriendly wrote:

Received my Definition frame today. Very well packed with lots of cosy fluffy stuff to keep it safe during transport.

The finish is very beautiful indeed. Can't wait to build it up (but have to wait for the wheels). According to my scales of semi-truth, the frame (in size 54) weighs 1663 grams and the fork 437 grams (with steerer yet to be cut).

In response to the points made above, if the price for a built-up bike seems excessive to you, just get the frame set to build it up yourself. I mostly did that because they're not (yet) offered as Campagnolo builds, but I reckon if you're hell-bent on saving money it's a good way to do that too. For what these frames are the prices are very competitive in my opinion.

You mean 1663 grams is the weight, uncut fork excluded or included ?
Cause if excluded that would be rather heavy, 1226 grams would be pretty light.
Thanks for clarifying

Avatar
Dr_Lex replied to userfriendly | 9 years ago
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userfriendly wrote:

[...] if the price for a built-up bike seems excessive to you, just get the frame set to build it up yourself.

Just priced the Ultegra Hydro versus the cost of the components and it was almost the same. Of course, shop around and you can save, but then what value does one put on time to assemble and warranty on a built bike?
(Awaiting the third frame for wider rubber before making my mind up.)

Avatar
carytb | 9 years ago
0 likes

It also says it's not available as well

Avatar
BigDummy | 9 years ago
1 like
Quote:

why should anyone spend up to £1,000 more just to ride a bike that's just the same as all the others but from a bit of a boutique brand?

I basically do it to annoy a small number of deranged commentators on road.cc. Some people say it's a strange way to use my vast wealth, but to be honest, Elon Musk and Tony Stark between them have the rest of the things that annoy me covered. So I just buy Masons and Donhous and read the comments.

 3

Avatar
knowsnobounds | 9 years ago
0 likes

It's easy to wax lyrical about a bike you've been given to ride, but the rest of us live in the real world and are spending real money. The Mason is undoubtedly a beautiful bike, but there are loads of beautiful 4 season bikes out there and most of them are much cheaper too. Take the emotion out of it and it comes down to geometry, tubing and build quality, so why should anyone spend up to £1,000 more just to ride a bike that's just the same as all the others but from a bit of a boutique brand? Nice to see Mason replying here but I have only seen them reply to the positive comments rather than the critical ones. You've missed a trick there as you could have converted those people into customers.

Avatar
Jonny_Trousers replied to knowsnobounds | 9 years ago
0 likes
knowsnobounds wrote:

It's easy to wax lyrical about a bike you've been given to ride, but the rest of us live in the real world and are spending real money. The Mason is undoubtedly a beautiful bike, but there are loads of beautiful 4 season bikes out there and most of them are much cheaper too.

Aren't you missing the point of a website/magazine that offers reviews? Inevitably, much of what is reviewed will be beyond the financial reach of those reading. It would get very boring if every time road.cc reported on a bike over a certain price they just said, "It's really nice, but save yourself some money and buy a Boardman instead."

knowsnobounds wrote:

Take the emotion out of it and it comes down to geometry, tubing and build quality, so why should anyone spend up to £1,000 more just to ride a bike that's just the same as all the others but from a bit of a boutique brand?

It's a good point, but could be applied to so many other items we spend money on. Why does anyone buy a nice watch when a £15 Timex will work just as well. Why does anyone drive a car that is not a second-hand Ford Mondeo? Surely we all accept by now that there is more to the bike we want to own than its price tag and its ability to ride as well as we practically need.

knowsnobounds wrote:

Nice to see Mason replying here but I have only seen them reply to the positive comments rather than the critical ones. You've missed a trick there as you could have converted those people into customers.

Personally speaking, I think he's been very wise ignoring the negative comments. Why waste precious time trying to engage those who have decided to trash your product? Far better to engage with those who have shown an interest. Speaking of wasting time, why the hell am I writing this post?

Avatar
knowsnobounds replied to Jonny_Trousers | 9 years ago
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Quote:

"Personally speaking, I think he's been very wise ignoring the negative comments. Why waste precious time trying to engage those who have decided to trash your product? Far better to engage with those who have shown an interest."

It's too easy these days to dismiss someone asking genuine yet critical questions as a 'hater' or as trashing the product, but that only pushes people further away - and that includes the people who are genuinely looking for answers, as well as the people reading this thread who see the lack of a response as disinterest from the manufacturer. The truth is that I'm in the market for a 'lifetime' bike, and at this price I'm in the area where I'd start wondering whether a custom build is the more viable option - and that's the point - Mason have positioned themselves somewhere you end up thinking 'well, I could get an off the peg 'x' for this much less, and a custom built 'y' isn't much more - why should I bother buying a Mason?'

I'm not seeing anything here or anywhere else that makes me think 'Nearly four grand for an aluminium bike? Sure...!' The fact that I end up feeling ignored by the manufacturer because they can't give me a simple response to that question strikes me as arrogant.

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finbar | 9 years ago
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This is a beautiful bike and very nicely designed, but I'm struggling with the pricetag compared to my Pinnacle Arkose (which I got from Evans at £110 for the frame). Appreciate why the frame costs what it does - guess I'm just not the target market.

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hampstead_bandit | 9 years ago
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very trim looking bike

hydraulic disc brakes are simply fantastic  1

I have been riding a bike with hydro discs and big 28c tires since November and cannot see myself ever going back to caliper brakes..

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P3t3 | 9 years ago
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Looks like they need to offer a nice set mudguards with rolled edges for sprayless audax and winter duties. Looks like you get what you pay for in details on this bike. When is the caliper version comming out? Also whats the biggest tyre you can fit sans mudguards?

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Dom replied to P3t3 | 9 years ago
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P3t3 wrote:

Looks like they need to offer a nice set mudguards with rolled edges for sprayless audax and winter duties. Looks like you get what you pay for in details on this bike. When is the caliper version comming out? Also whats the biggest tyre you can fit sans mudguards?

Hi P3t3,

Glad you like the bike : ]

Would love to offer our own 'guards, will work on it for MY2!

No plans for caliper version as yet, but not ruling it out.

Not managed to test max tyre size yet! But I'm thinking a 32 road tyre will work. I'll be getting some 32's and running a test as soon as poss.

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tigrolino22 | 9 years ago
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For Dom.
What size of tire Will the Definition take max without fender ?
Thx

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Dom replied to tigrolino22 | 9 years ago
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tigrolino22 wrote:

For Dom.
What size of tire Will the Definition take max without fender ?
Thx

Hi tigrolino22,

I haven't tested the max tyre size yet! Although I must get round to it because it's a common question. I'm pretty sure a road 32 will be fine as we tested the bikes with Schwalbe tubeless 28's which are very large + full 'guards and there was still generous clearance.

I'll get some 32's and test them and post results asap.

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tigrolino22 replied to Dom | 9 years ago
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Thanks for the reply Dom. Coming from mountainbiking and wanting to switch to a road bike, I am looking at the off-road capabilities off this next bike. You feel this bike van cater to that need or am I beter off waiting for the sporty adventure bike you mentioned in an earlier interview ? Anything you can anticipate on that project ?
Thanks

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Bryin | 9 years ago
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19lbs and 3750??? Ditch the stupid shifting and the moronic brakes and you lose 1.5-2lbs plus gain some aero... It is HILARIOUS that tools are now spending more for heavier bikes. Bottom line, buying this bike is just dumb.

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Alb replied to Bryin | 9 years ago
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Yeah, 'cos clearly weight and aerodynamics were top priorities here! I'll largely bet that the people vocally knocking hydro discs haven't tried them - and by trying them I mean actually ridden then, not squeezed a lever on a display bike in Evans.

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Jonny_Trousers replied to Bryin | 9 years ago
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Bryin wrote:

19lbs and 3750??? Ditch the stupid shifting and the moronic brakes and you lose 1.5-2lbs plus gain some aero... It is HILARIOUS that tools are now spending more for heavier bikes. Bottom line, buying this bike is just dumb.

What's also hilarious is that some tools still think that ride quality is dictated by weight alone, and that disc brakes make a discernible aero difference.

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Kadinkski replied to Jonny_Trousers | 9 years ago
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Jonny_Trousers wrote:

What's also hilarious is that some tools still think that ride quality is dictated by weight alone, and that disc brakes make a discernible aero difference.

Indeed. Its so odd that a person can read such a thorough and detailed review yet still so spectacularly misunderstand the raison d'être of the bike.

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joebee9870 | 9 years ago
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Got the wheels (with Schwalbe 1's 25mm) on my Genesis CDF and they F'ing rock.

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therevokid | 9 years ago
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damn you limited finances ....  3

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Yorky-M | 9 years ago
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super detail. bikes with soul

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