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Chris Froome to return to racing at UAE Tour next month

Team Ineos star back in the peloton eight months after Dauphiné crash

Chris Froome will be back racing at the UAE Tour next month, marking his return to racing more than eight months after his horrific crash during the Critérium du Dauphiné last June.

The 34-year-old had been undertaking a recce of the individual time trial course at the French race when he crashed into a wall, sustaining injuries including fractured ribs, right femur and elbow.

Having undergone several operations, he began training late last year and his sole focus this season is to be back to full fitness ahead of the Tour de France, which starts in Nice on 27 June.

In a message posted to Twitter, Froome said: “Training's been going really well over here in Gran Canaria, so I'm really happy to announce that I'm going to be starting my season at the UAE Tour next month starting in Dubai.

“It's a race I missed out on last year so it's a great place to start my season this time around.”

Last week, Froome said that the possibility of being able to challenge for a record-equalling fifth yellow jersey was fuelling his determination to fully recover from his injuries and return to racing.

“The only appointment I've set myself is the Tour de France – and until then, every week I'm just going to keep chipping away, keep trying to make the most of every camp and every race to build up to July and hope that come that start line in Nice, I'll be ready to go,” he said.

“The prospect of going for a fifth yellow jersey is just massive for me, it's such a motivation. But on top of that now, obviously coming back from this injury, it's even more reason for me to try and get back there.

“There are no guarantees in sport. No guarantees that I'll be back to challenge for it, but I'm going to give it absolutely everything I've got.”

Covering seven stages, the UAE Tour takes place from 23-29 February.

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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