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Lezyne launches new Mega XL and Mega C GPS units with up to 48-hour runtime

One colour and one that can go landscape, and both retailing for £180 in the UK

Lezyne has just announced two new GPS models, the Mega C and the Mega XL. Both will retail in the UK for £180, or for £270 as a loaded bundle with a HRM strap and a combined speed and cadence sensor.

If there's one thing that Lezyne is keen to impress on us about these new computers, it's battery life. In a market where run times have tended to be getting shorter, because manufacturers have been adding features, Lezyne is bucking the trend here. The monochrome Mega XL has a claimed battery life of a whopping 48 hours, and the colour-screened Mega C will burn for 32 hours before the lights go out.

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"This puts all other GPS computers in the dark, literally", says Lezyne "This feature will very much appeal the growing number of distance and ultra-distance and Audax cyclists, as well and just regular cyclist that do not want to worry about losing data from a long week of commuting." Obviously that's dependent on the computers living up to their claims, but we've had very good run times out of the other Lezyne GPS units we've had, and even if the Mega XL doesn't quite make it to two days it's still going to be a way in front of anything comparable.

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The Mega C and Mega XL share many of their capabilities. Both are Bluetooth and ANT+ compatible and designed to work with Lezyne's Ally smartphone app. They can pick up both GPS and GLONASS satellite positioning data for greater accuracy, and they a barometric altimeter for accurate climbing data. Both can store 800 hours of ride data. The 240x320 colour screen of the Mega C can display up to 8 data fields at once, while the Mega XL, with its bigger 320x400 monochrome screen, can squeeze in 10. The Mega XL can rotate on Lezyne's X-Lock mount to display horizontally if you prefer.

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The Mega XL and Mega C can do all the things you'd expect from your GPS. Many of the more intensive functions – routing, Strava live segments and the like – work on the computer in conjunction with your smartphone running the Ally app. The smartphone connection also allows you to receive notifications. The App has been improved so that it's possible to download the mapping needed for routing before you set off, and send it to the GPS, so that a patchy signal en route doesn't affect the unit's ability to get you to where you're going.

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The Ally app and Lezyne's GPS Root portal remain free to use. The Mega C and Mega XL can be configured to automatically upload data to Strava, TrainingPeaks or Today's Plan, and you can follow structured workouts using the Mega C and Mega XL too.

We expect to see the new computers at the Eurobike Show this weekend and we'll be getting units for testing very soon. So look out for a review on road.cc before long.

 

Dave is a founding father of road.cc, having previously worked on Cycling Plus and What Mountain Bike magazines back in the day. He also writes about e-bikes for our sister publication ebiketips. He's won three mountain bike bog snorkelling World Championships, and races at the back of the third cats.

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16 comments

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BehindTheBikesheds | 3285 posts | 5 years ago
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I just saw the Garmin 401 today, 17 hours on 2xAAA batteries, £140. Not for me but might be for some.

As for the Garmin line about losing a weeks worth of commuter data as a selling point of the long battery life, hilarious nonsense, do they really think this bullshit will pass muster or do they think people really are thick as shit?

Increasing the bulk to add a few hours for a handful of long distance cyclists isn't a very good business plan IMHO, not at the price - it's $199/$299 in the US which is about £153/£230. How many ultra cyclists wouldn't simply recharge their unit every day as a matter of course,  and are these basic units the type of GPS systems that long distance cyclists want anyway?

I know companies are struggling to find a USP for their products but the advantages of this over others is just on the run time, I don't think it's enough for it at the price to be a winner.

  

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amilne | 1 post | 5 years ago
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I've had and got more GPS devices that I care to remember. I do long (1 month) time solo rides so the mapping and battery life are important. Does anyone know the map memory capacity in MB? I've looked and a 100MB file seems to cover about 60 miles square very approximately. My phone can take lots but I'd get an idea of how often I'd have to transfer best quality maps during a trip with either this or another GPS as spare.

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2trax | 17 posts | 5 years ago
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Does these do on-the fly routing? I'm not very good at sticking to the routes that I pre-load, usually because I didn't notice when designing it that I was sending myself up over some massive hill range when there is a perfectly good road in the valley!

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LezyneOfficial replied to 2trax | 6 posts | 5 years ago
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2trax wrote:

Does these do on-the fly routing? I'm not very good at sticking to the routes that I pre-load, usually because I didn't notice when designing it that I was sending myself up over some massive hill range when there is a perfectly good road in the valley!

Yes! We've actually supported on-the-fly routing (we call it A to B) for a while now. The new devices will also show the route on an on-screen map that you download to the device. All of our current GPS devices will soon be able to navigate and reroute without cell service.

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alexb | 251 posts | 5 years ago
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For those long distance cyclists who don;t need the ANT+ connectivity, the Garmin eTrex series are still hard to beat. They'll run happily off a USB connection to a hub dynamo and draw so little power that they don;t affect lighting performance. They'll also run off standard or rechargeable AA batteries and use Open Street Mapping.

The eTrex won't do on the fly routing though (however, it's possible to do this on a 4G connected cell phone and then transfer the memory card with its uploaded GPS file into the Garmin).

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ConcordeCX replied to alexb | 1204 posts | 5 years ago
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alexb wrote:

For those long distance cyclists who don;t need the ANT+ connectivity, the Garmin eTrex series are still hard to beat. They'll run happily off a USB connection to a hub dynamo and draw so little power that they don;t affect lighting performance. They'll also run off standard or rechargeable AA batteries and use Open Street Mapping.

The eTrex won't do on the fly routing though (however, it's possible to do this on a 4G connected cell phone and then transfer the memory card with its uploaded GPS file into the Garmin).

i've used etrexes for years, currently a 35 Touch. I don't understand what you mean by "won't do on-the-fly routing". Mine do it; not always when I want them to...

 

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dave atkinson | 6732 posts | 5 years ago
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well we should have one in the next week or so, so we'll get straight on it  1

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rbs4898 replied to dave atkinson | 1 post | 4 years ago
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dave atkinson wrote:

well we should have one in the next week or so, so we'll get straight on it  1

 

Hi there, is there any update on when a full review may be available?

Thanks

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mrchrispy | 526 posts | 5 years ago
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I'm looking to replace my trusty 810 so looking forward to the review. 

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tugglesthegreat | 130 posts | 5 years ago
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I was looking at the Elemnt or Bolt.  Now I feel like waiting for a review and some user experience reviews. 

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dreamy | 37 posts | 5 years ago
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They look very nice.

48 hr gps device is hard to believe, so very much looking forward to this review.

 

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dave atkinson replied to dreamy | 6732 posts | 5 years ago
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dreamy wrote:

They look very nice.

48 hr gps device is hard to believe, so very much looking forward to this review.

the Super GPS quoted 24 hours and I regularly got 16-18 hours out of it without trying too hard, so if it's a 48hr quoted run time i reckon you can expect to get 32-36 hours out of it in normal use. that's still a lot of run time. it's a *bit* ambiguous from the specs but it looks like you can download offline maps direct to the device for routing rather than routing from the app. if so, you can ditch the app connection which means more power savings

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dreamy replied to dave atkinson | 37 posts | 5 years ago
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dave atkinson wrote:

the Super GPS quoted 24 hours and I regularly got 16-18 hours out of it without trying too hard, so if it's a 48hr quoted run time i reckon you can expect to get 32-36 hours out of it in normal use. that's still a lot of run time. it's a *bit* ambiguous from the specs but it looks like you can download offline maps direct to the device for routing rather than routing from the app. if so, you can ditch the app connection which means more power savings

You'll have to do a none stop 36 hour cycle to really prove this. Think of your readers.

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dave atkinson replied to dreamy | 6732 posts | 5 years ago
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dreamy wrote:
dave atkinson wrote:

the Super GPS quoted 24 hours and I regularly got 16-18 hours out of it without trying too hard, so if it's a 48hr quoted run time i reckon you can expect to get 32-36 hours out of it in normal use. that's still a lot of run time. it's a *bit* ambiguous from the specs but it looks like you can download offline maps direct to the device for routing rather than routing from the app. if so, you can ditch the app connection which means more power savings

You'll have to do a none stop 36 hour cycle to really prove this. Think of your readers.

We can find out how it copes with me being sick all over it too, if i try that

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McVittees | 116 posts | 5 years ago
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Whoops. Double post.

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McVittees | 116 posts | 5 years ago
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If you can upload Open Street Cycle Maps then I'd certainly consider dumping my Garmin 520.

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