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Arnie's back in Australia - and he's still not wearing a cycle helmet

Terminator star was stopped by police in Victorian capital two years ago but is still riding lidless - despite journalist's gift of a helmet...

Almost two years to the day after a police officer in Australia pulled him over for riding a bike without a helmet, Arnold Schwarzenegger has once again been spotted riding a bike in Melbourne bare-headed – despite a journalist gifting one to the Terminator star and former governor of California so he wouldn’t repeat the offence.

In March 2015, the 69-year-old was stopped by Senior Constable Robert Gillson in the Victorian capital as he rode through the city on one of its hire scheme bikes. Instead of fining him, the officer directed him instead to a nearby 7-Eleven store where he could by a helmet for A$5.

> Arnold Schwarzenegger pulled over by Melbourne police - for riding bike without helmet

Schwarzenegger has been back in Australia to attend his annual Arnold Classic multi-sports contest.

At a press conference, Australian journalist Seb Costello gave the actor-turned-politician a cycle helmet – but Schwarzenegger was snapped the following day going for a ride in the city, it was dangling from his bike’s handlebars.

 The globetrotting former Governator has a habit of breaking laws when he hops on a bike while broad – last year, he rode down the wrong side of a street in Scotland’s capital, Edinburgh.

> Arnie spotted cycling on wrong side of road in Edinburgh

Last autumn, after visiting the Oktoberfest in Munich, he was stopped by police as he rode through the Bavarian city’s main railway station – an infraction which cost him no more than a request for a selfie with the officer concerned.

> Schwarzenegger's bike ride through German train station terminated by police

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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