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Hi guys,

Been lurking for a year while learning the ropes on my alloy btwin 105. Had a great year improving on my weekly club rides and a decent year at work so want to "invest" and upgrade to a nice carbon machine. I'm 35, 5,10, 80kg and getting fitter every week. Due to my weight and my lack of skill descending I want discs and I can't really see past the value of Canyon. 

 

In looking at;

 

2018 Ultimate CF SL Disc 8.0, full new ultegra, dt swiss wheels 7.5kg £2600

 

2017 Ultimate CF SL Disc 9.0 Aero, older Ultegra, Mavic Cosmic Pro carbon aero wheels, carbon cockpit 7.9kg discounted to £2760

 

The 2018 I can get is cheaper, I can get in stage race blue which I love and reviews are that is pretty much faultless. 

 

The 2017 has the carbon deep rims wheels and the aero cockpit which are worth the best part of £1000, they will probably make me go about zero mph faster but look very cool in my opinion, I can only get in stealth which is quite batman look but not first choice. I am also acutely aware of looking like a total knob if I get dropped while sporting deep rims. Really can't decide and am stuck!

 

I did also try to support my lbs and he is trying to sell me the Bianchi Aria Disc aero bike which is very cool but half a kilo heavier and really cheap wheels, I also think you really need to want a bianchi to pay that sort of money for them. 

Please help me with your experienced opinions!

 

41 comments

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
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2018 CF SL 8.0

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
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2017 CF SL 9.0 Aero 

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
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2018 Bianchi Aria 

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Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
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Hi Deano,

Like you, I made my first foray into the carbon bicycle world this year. I got myself a 2017 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc 8.0 (the one with full Ultegra and Mavic Cosmics) and subsequently upgraded to Ultegra R8000.

I absolutely love it to bits, the only thing that could be improved is the wheel weight, the Cosmics are a bit porky compared to DT Swiss offerings.

Here's my take, Ultegra R8000 is noticeably nicer than Ultegra 6800 and RS685's, If you aren't too worried about having sexy deep section wheels, then losing a bit of wheel weight by choosing the DT Swiss option would be great. I really really like the integrated bar and stem too, looks awesome and is forgiving on the hands (but totally unadjustable).

This is a really tough call, Id certainly have the R8000 over 6800/RS685 but I'd choose the integrated carbon cockpit over the conventional one.

Wheel's, I'd choose aero (but that's because I use my Canyon solely for fast rides smashing the hell out of myself - 20mph+ for 1-2 hours on mixed terrain). If I were choosing wheels to use on a slightly more relaxed, more versatile setup, I'd chose the DT Swiss wheels no question (as I have done on my winter/commute bike).

The 2018 model has more upgrade potential (wheels and cockpit), the 2017 model could do with R8000.

If you want an absolute all-out race type machine, go for the 2017 and stick R8000 on it. If you want something a little bit lighter and a little more versatile, it'd easily have to be the 2018 model.

EDIT: Also forgot to say that the Mavic tyres that come with the deep section cosmics are rubbish - I replaced them with Conti GP 4000's right away - the DT Swiss wheeled Canyon already comes with Conti GP 4000's.

Avatar
Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
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As for the Bianchi, looks stunning also has R8000, aero racey frame... Wheels however, very meh and not suited to the rest of the bike (need some deep wheels for that!).

Style over substance maybe?

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don simon [2530 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

How windy is it where you live? Crosswinds will be an absolute bugger with the Aero. But the frame isn't too aero.

Worth thinking about.

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
wellsprop wrote:

Hi Deano,

Like you, I made my first foray into the carbon bicycle world this year. I got myself a 2017 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc 8.0 (the one with full Ultegra and Mavic Cosmics) and subsequently upgraded to Ultegra R8000.

I absolutely love it to bits, the only thing that could be improved is the wheel weight, the Cosmics are a bit porky compared to DT Swiss offerings.

Here's my take, Ultegra R8000 is noticeably nicer than Ultegra 6800 and RS685's, If you aren't too worried about having sexy deep section wheels, then losing a bit of wheel weight by choosing the DT Swiss option would be great. I really really like the integrated bar and stem too, looks awesome and is forgiving on the hands (but totally unadjustable).

This is a really tough call, Id certainly have the R8000 over 6800/RS685 but I'd choose the integrated carbon cockpit over the conventional one.

Wheel's, I'd choose aero (but that's because I use my Canyon solely for fast rides smashing the hell out of myself - 20mph+ for 1-2 hours on mixed terrain). If I were choosing wheels to use on a slightly more relaxed, more versatile setup, I'd chose the DT Swiss wheels no question (as I have done on my winter/commute bike).

The 2018 model has more upgrade potential (wheels and cockpit), the 2017 model could do with R8000.

If you want an absolute all-out race type machine, go for the 2017 and stick R8000 on it. If you want something a little bit lighter and a little more versatile, it'd easily have to be the 2018 model.

EDIT: Also forgot to say that the Mavic tyres that come with the deep section cosmics are rubbish - I replaced them with Conti GP 4000's right away - the DT Swiss wheeled Canyon already comes with Conti GP 4000's.

Thanks wellsprop,

when you say R8000 is noticiably different, is this in the shifting, braking or both? currently running 105 and shifting is fine, my tektro rim brakes are poor, even 6800 would be a big jump and I could upgrade later when i go to DI2. If i go with the aero as really it is better monetry value I could buy a set of training/climbing wheels. I will be using the bike as an all rounder for joining the faster groups in my club runs, doing climbing abroad once a year, but I do have some distant pipedream of doing some TT'ing. I can't get the stage race blue out my head though, if it was stealth it would be a no brainer for the aero unless the R8000 is worth more performance wise than the aero details.  102 102 102

 

Avatar
deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
don simon wrote:

How windy is it where you live? Crosswinds will be an absolute bugger with the Aero. But the frame isn't too aero.

Worth thinking about.

 

Yes did consider that but I think I will be fine riding around herts, beds and bucks, what we consider a hurricane is probably a light breeze in other places of the UK!

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
wellsprop wrote:

As for the Bianchi, looks stunning also has R8000, aero racey frame... Wheels however, very meh and not suited to the rest of the bike (need some deep wheels for that!).

Style over substance maybe?

 

I tried it on the turbo trainer in the store, and they want to give me one for a week to test. Looks amazing, it def looks like it has flair rather than a finely tuned and engineered machine. I think its like buying an Alfa Romeo, you always know the BMW is a better car but you still want one.

Avatar
Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
deano802 wrote:
wellsprop wrote:

Hi Deano,

Like you, I made my first foray into the carbon bicycle world this year. I got myself a 2017 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc 8.0 (the one with full Ultegra and Mavic Cosmics) and subsequently upgraded to Ultegra R8000.

I absolutely love it to bits, the only thing that could be improved is the wheel weight, the Cosmics are a bit porky compared to DT Swiss offerings.

Here's my take, Ultegra R8000 is noticeably nicer than Ultegra 6800 and RS685's, If you aren't too worried about having sexy deep section wheels, then losing a bit of wheel weight by choosing the DT Swiss option would be great. I really really like the integrated bar and stem too, looks awesome and is forgiving on the hands (but totally unadjustable).

This is a really tough call, Id certainly have the R8000 over 6800/RS685 but I'd choose the integrated carbon cockpit over the conventional one.

Wheel's, I'd choose aero (but that's because I use my Canyon solely for fast rides smashing the hell out of myself - 20mph+ for 1-2 hours on mixed terrain). If I were choosing wheels to use on a slightly more relaxed, more versatile setup, I'd chose the DT Swiss wheels no question (as I have done on my winter/commute bike).

The 2018 model has more upgrade potential (wheels and cockpit), the 2017 model could do with R8000.

If you want an absolute all-out race type machine, go for the 2017 and stick R8000 on it. If you want something a little bit lighter and a little more versatile, it'd easily have to be the 2018 model.

EDIT: Also forgot to say that the Mavic tyres that come with the deep section cosmics are rubbish - I replaced them with Conti GP 4000's right away - the DT Swiss wheeled Canyon already comes with Conti GP 4000's.

Thanks wellsprop,

when you say R8000 is noticiably different, is this in the shifting, braking or both? currently running 105 and shifting is fine, my tektro rim brakes are poor, even 6800 would be a big jump and I could upgrade later when i go to DI2. If i go with the aero as really it is better monetry value I could buy a set of training/climbing wheels. I will be using the bike as an all rounder for joining the faster groups in my club runs, doing climbing abroad once a year, but I do have some distant pipedream of doing some TT'ing. I can't get the stage race blue out my head though, if it was stealth it would be a no brainer for the aero unless the R8000 is worth more performance wise than the aero details.  102 102 102

 

No worries,

The shifting on the front mech is noticeably nicer with the new front derailleur (and much easier to setup). The rear mech shifting feels a little crisper than RS685 (which shifts nearly as well as 105 mechanical), so the shifting of the hydraulic R8000 feels a good if not slightly sharper than 105 mechanical. In terms of performance, aero wheels give you a speed advantage over shallower wheels whilst R8000 will give you an ergonomic advantage over 6800/RS685 (I think R8000 is about 150 grams lighter though).

I didn't notice any difference in the feel of braking between RS685 and R8000 (I actually put smaller 140mm rotors on my Canyon when I switched to R8000 as I weigh 67kg, so don't need all the extra power) - even the 140mm hydros are way better than the 105 mechanical rims ive been used to!

With regards to crosswinds, I often cycle out on the Somerset levels and across the Old Severn Bridge to Wales, I've cycled in 15mph xwinds and had no real issues. I do notice that the front end is always a bit skittish - but very controllable once I got used to the front end occasionally dancing a small amount side to side (easily manageable even when I've been group riding).

If you are planning to go to Di2 in the future, I'd suggest buying the aero with 6800 and buying yourself a set of light shallow/mid wheels. Then, when you decide to go to Di2, splashing out on R8000 Di2. That way, you have total versatility with two sets of wheels and the added benefit of the aero cockpit!

The aero also comes in Stage Race Blue, does it not? I went with Gran Tourismo Blue on my CF SLX and I'm glad I did, looks sweet in the flesh!

Avatar
deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
wellsprop wrote:
deano802 wrote:
wellsprop wrote:

Hi Deano,

Like you, I made my first foray into the carbon bicycle world this year. I got myself a 2017 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc 8.0 (the one with full Ultegra and Mavic Cosmics) and subsequently upgraded to Ultegra R8000.

I absolutely love it to bits, the only thing that could be improved is the wheel weight, the Cosmics are a bit porky compared to DT Swiss offerings.

Here's my take, Ultegra R8000 is noticeably nicer than Ultegra 6800 and RS685's, If you aren't too worried about having sexy deep section wheels, then losing a bit of wheel weight by choosing the DT Swiss option would be great. I really really like the integrated bar and stem too, looks awesome and is forgiving on the hands (but totally unadjustable).

This is a really tough call, Id certainly have the R8000 over 6800/RS685 but I'd choose the integrated carbon cockpit over the conventional one.

Wheel's, I'd choose aero (but that's because I use my Canyon solely for fast rides smashing the hell out of myself - 20mph+ for 1-2 hours on mixed terrain). If I were choosing wheels to use on a slightly more relaxed, more versatile setup, I'd chose the DT Swiss wheels no question (as I have done on my winter/commute bike).

The 2018 model has more upgrade potential (wheels and cockpit), the 2017 model could do with R8000.

If you want an absolute all-out race type machine, go for the 2017 and stick R8000 on it. If you want something a little bit lighter and a little more versatile, it'd easily have to be the 2018 model.

EDIT: Also forgot to say that the Mavic tyres that come with the deep section cosmics are rubbish - I replaced them with Conti GP 4000's right away - the DT Swiss wheeled Canyon already comes with Conti GP 4000's.

Thanks wellsprop,

when you say R8000 is noticiably different, is this in the shifting, braking or both? currently running 105 and shifting is fine, my tektro rim brakes are poor, even 6800 would be a big jump and I could upgrade later when i go to DI2. If i go with the aero as really it is better monetry value I could buy a set of training/climbing wheels. I will be using the bike as an all rounder for joining the faster groups in my club runs, doing climbing abroad once a year, but I do have some distant pipedream of doing some TT'ing. I can't get the stage race blue out my head though, if it was stealth it would be a no brainer for the aero unless the R8000 is worth more performance wise than the aero details.  102 102 102

 

No worries,

The shifting on the front mech is noticeably nicer with the new front derailleur (and much easier to setup). The rear mech shifting feels a little crisper than RS685 (which shifts nearly as well as 105 mechanical), so the shifting of the hydraulic R8000 feels a good if not slightly sharper than 105 mechanical. In terms of performance, aero wheels give you a speed advantage over shallower wheels whilst R8000 will give you an ergonomic advantage over 6800/RS685 (I think R8000 is about 150 grams lighter though).

I didn't notice any difference in the feel of braking between RS685 and R8000 (I actually put smaller 140mm rotors on my Canyon when I switched to R8000 as I weigh 67kg, so don't need all the extra power) - even the 140mm hydros are way better than the 105 mechanical rims ive been used to!

With regards to crosswinds, I often cycle out on the Somerset levels and across the Old Severn Bridge to Wales, I've cycled in 15mph xwinds and had no real issues. I do notice that the front end is always a bit skittish - but very controllable once I got used to the front end occasionally dancing a small amount side to side (easily manageable even when I've been group riding).

If you are planning to go to Di2 in the future, I'd suggest buying the aero with 6800 and buying yourself a set of light shallow/mid wheels. Then, when you decide to go to Di2, splashing out on R8000 Di2. That way, you have total versatility with two sets of wheels and the added benefit of the aero cockpit!

The aero also comes in Stage Race Blue, does it not? I went with Gran Tourismo Blue on my CF SLX and I'm glad I did, looks sweet in the flesh!

 

Yeah I agree the aero is the way to go I think, as I am looking at 2017 model which is discounted in their outlet they only have the stealth, the blue is nicer but  I can live with it. 

Avatar
Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
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deano802 wrote:

Yeah I agree the aero is the way to go I think, as I am looking at 2017 model which is discounted in their outlet they only have the stealth, the blue is nicer but  I can live with it. 

Ah, that's a bit of a pain! Good discount though smiley

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madcarew [786 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

"Skittish in crosswinds" ? An aero frame adds less than 1% of side area to the total area of a bike and cyclist. Except for those frames that are nearly completely filled in (triathlon beasts) my experience of riding aero frames (palmerston north, NZ... some years the windiest city on the planet) is that there is negligible difference between an aero frame and standard frame when compared sith the same wheels on.

The Bianchi looks fab, but the canyon is great value for money

Avatar
deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
madcarew wrote:

"Skittish in crosswinds" ? An aero frame adds less than 1% of side area to the total area of a bike and cyclist. Except for those frames that are nearly completely filled in (triathlon beasts) my experience of riding aero frames (palmerston north, NZ... some years the windiest city on the planet) is that there is negligible difference between an aero frame and standard frame when compared sith the same wheels on.

The Bianchi looks fab, but the canyon is great value for money

I really buy into all the marketing hype, I know I do and I love it also, love researching and having the latest gear etc. Just for the fun of it. 

Your comment proves the point that every bit of gear  is within a couple of % of each other, we should all just buy whatever we like for fun. I don't even think it makes a difference in the tour, if someone puts a bit more power down the bike is largely irrelevant!

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BehindTheBikesheds [2279 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

Discs aren't going to improve your descending skills nor make you any faster or safer.

As for using weight as a reason for needing discs, I'm a shade over 100kg at the age of 48 and 107kg at my biggest, never had issues descending fast and I've never ridden on anything but rim brakes since I started road riding in the mid 80s (I was 82kg when I was 16), never not had enough braking power, funnily enough nor have pro racers.

You're relatively new to cycling, clearly you want to go faster/improve but have a really long hard think about your motives for going disc. I love the colour, not sure about the brand personally and havenever used them.

If you do consider a rim braked bike you could go for a discounted Giant TCR Advanced 2 (Available in blue), strip the components off and have £1700 to spend on whatever kit you want plus the money from flogging off the 105 drivetrain and stock wheels so close to £2k, you could buy a lot of kit for that.

Also the Giant Advanced Pro 1 disc is ball park to the Canyon in price and available in blue.

good luck whatever you buy.

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alansmurphy [1868 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

What BTBS said, except the bit about safety, discs stop quicker in the wet and modulate better...

Oh and get a helmet!

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BehindTheBikesheds [2279 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
alansmurphy wrote:

What BTBS said, except the bit about safety, discs stop quicker in the wet and modulate better... Oh and get a helmet!

Braking in the wet is limited by tyre grip and the ability to think/react about when to brake (& having the time to do so) and having a decent set up. Discs shorten the thinking time as riders think they can brake later, discs aren't safer and there's no evidence to support that at all, they also go off when braking hard whilst descending, something the OP mentions he does and isn't great at so could well be on the brakes more than some. Modulation, well that's only ever a problem for those that don't wish to learn how to brake properly, it's no way to learn/get better!

Why a helmet, no-one, not even the pros need helmets, they've been proven in racing circles to bring about more deaths, more crashes and more injuries despite other improvements on course and general H&S/protocol improvements.

The OP admits to not being a great descender, over the last 2 decades the wearing of helmets have proven to be a massive problem for people on bikes who then ride beyond their own skill level and the ability of their bikes and come a cropper time and time and time again the helmet not making a jot of difference to the stats but an awful lot of helmet saved my life/saved me from serious injury stories. It certainly isn't going to improve their riding skills nor their safety at any level, quite the opposite.

Why do people advocate helmets when all they do is endanger sporting cyclists even more than without!

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Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
alansmurphy wrote:

What BTBS said, except the bit about safety, discs stop quicker in the wet and modulate better... Oh and get a helmet!

Braking in the wet is limited by tyre grip and the ability to think/react about when to brake (& having the time to do so) and having a decent set up. Discs shorten the thinking time as riders think they can brake later, discs aren't safer and there's no evidence to support that at all, they also go off when braking hard whilst descending, something the OP mentions he does and isn't great at so could well be on the brakes more than some. Modulation, well that's only ever a problem for those that don't wish to learn how to brake properly, it's no way to learn/get better!

Why a helmet, no-one, not even the pros need helmets, they've been proven in racing circles to bring about more deaths, more crashes and more injuries despite other improvements on course and general H&S/protocol improvements.

The OP admits to not being a great descender, over the last 2 decades the wearing of helmets have proven to be a massive problem for people on bikes who then ride beyond their own skill level and the ability of their bikes and come a cropper time and time and time again the helmet not making a jot of difference to the stats but an awful lot of helmet saved my life/saved me from serious injury stories. It certainly isn't going to improve their riding skills nor their safety at any level, quite the opposite.

Why do people advocate helmets when all they do is endanger sporting cyclists even more than without!

Brakes don't affect thinking time. Thinking time is down to human performance and reactions.

Disc brakes are vastly better in the wet, particularly compared to carbon rims.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHFSSXOSnxs

Rim brakes suffer from brake fade much sooner than disc brakes. Both disc and rim brakes suffer from brake fade and will fail eventually when pushed beyond their limits.

Disc brakes are not essential, rim brakes are more than sufficient. Disc brakes don't wear carbon rims either (if that's of concern).

I have a bike with Ultegra rim brakes and a bike with Ultegra disc brakes, I find it much easier to stop quickly using disc brakes as the reduced braking force and better modulation makes it much easier to not lock the rear wheel. Personal preference really.

EDIT: Yeah, I also agree that weight is no reason to need disc brakes - personal preference again  10

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BehindTheBikesheds [2279 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

Er, yes brake type does affect thinking time.

If you come to expect to be able to brake at x distance away then you brake at that point or even later as a sporting cyclist (even as a commuter).

If you imagine that you can brake later because you have discs/better brakes then you shorten the thinking time to an event that may unexpectedly happen before you intend to brake - a car pulling out of a junction in front, a bend that comes up quicker than you expected or was tighter or an object that is in the road that wouldn't be expected to be there.

So you've allowed yourself less time/distance than previously (one of the positives promoted is to be able to brake/reduce speed in a shorter distnce right) ergo your thinking time IS reduced because of what you percieve to be the braking distance based on the 'improved' braking.

Humans can only make decisions in a finite amount of time, that's why you still see panic braking in the pro ranks and locked wheels/crashes. The disc brake itself comparatively does brake somewhat better in some very narrow set of circumstances but the grip of the tyres is overcome quite easily by rim brakes and as I've said people brake later with discs and thus won't be any safer with them.  

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fenix [1051 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

As has been said - you don't need discs. I've used rim brakes for decades and they work fine for me and I do descend faster than most.

Aero bikes look pretty but there's no real world benefit - and I have one.

Deep rims wheels can be a bit of a pain in the bum. Recent years have been so windy that I'm happy to lose a bit of aero speed for a bit more stability in side winds. That's what I've done anyway. I save deep rims for racing on now.

Weight isn't that important unless all you do is climb hills and I'd you do that why have aero wheels ?

You don't notice your bike being faster when you've drunk 500ml of fluid from the water bottle do you ?

Aero cockpits look nice but you need to be sure you have the set up right. Separate stems and bars don't cost you any speed but can help with comfort.

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CXR94Di2 [2192 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

enix [853 posts] 9 hours ago 0 likes
As has been said - you don't need discs. I've used rim brakes for decades and they work fine for me and I do descend faster than most.

That's because you can't slow down on rim brakes  4

Rim brakes work fine on alloy rims even mountain descent s. Add rain or wet conditions. Disc brakes work better

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

I understand everyones comments on discs, a lot tend to be from skilled cyclists, but from my experience of getting back on the bike a year ago after not riding since at school I feel they are an advantage. I find if descending on the hoods its just dangerous as you cant get enough pressure on the levers if needed, and even in the drops I have left it a bit too late going into a bend and ended up going wide and on the wrong side of the road. Does anyone need digital tv or radio when analogue will do, or you can still listen to music in mono but I prefer stereo. Do I need them? No, Do I want them? Yes

 

 

 

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kevvjj [422 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

What a pity this has turned into (yet another) debate about discs vs calipers. There's no law that says you have to buy a bike with discs (or calipers). MTBs... never looked back, CX bikes... never looked back, road bikes - in two years time this will have all gone away, the only people disadvantaged will be the rim makers as fewer rims will need replacing. If you are running carbon wheels this is a no-brainer - carbon rim brakes are never, ever going to be good/confidence inspiring in the wet.

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700c [1262 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Weight isn't that important unless all you do is climb hills and I'd you do that why have aero wheels ? You don't notice your bike being faster when you've drunk 500ml of fluid from the water bottle do you ? 

ah that's because the 500ml is now in your body so total rider+ bike weight roughly the same!

Call me crazy but I do notice the difference between going out with no bottle vs going out with a full one (mine's around 650 ml), particularly when accelerating up hills. 

Agree with the other stuff you've said though.

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alansmurphy [1868 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes

I was mostly taking the piss but BTBS is so entrenched in his views I considered it worth a poke.

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Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
kevvjj wrote:

What a pity this has turned into (yet another) debate about discs vs calipers. There's no law that says you have to buy a bike with discs (or calipers). MTBs... never looked back, CX bikes... never looked back, road bikes - in two years time this will have all gone away, the only people disadvantaged will be the rim makers as fewer rims will need replacing. If you are running carbon wheels this is a no-brainer - carbon rim brakes are never, ever going to be good/confidence inspiring in the wet.

Yep, exactly what I though  7

If you want discs, have discs. If you want rims, have rims. Just don't start telling people what they should/shouldn't have - particularly when one type performs significantly better in pretty much all conditions.

Oh, and if anyone is worried about disc brakes being less aero, they really don't have any more drag than rim brakes, nothing significant anyway.

alansmurphy wrote:

I was mostly taking the piss but BTBS is so entrenched in his views I considered it worth a poke.

Avatar
Canyon48 [1054 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
deano802 wrote:

I understand everyones comments on discs, a lot tend to be from skilled cyclists, but from my experience of getting back on the bike a year ago after not riding since at school I feel they are an advantage. I find if descending on the hoods its just dangerous as you cant get enough pressure on the levers if needed, and even in the drops I have left it a bit too late going into a bend and ended up going wide and on the wrong side of the road. Does anyone need digital tv or radio when analogue will do, or you can still listen to music in mono but I prefer stereo. Do I need them? No, Do I want them? Yes

You're right on all accounts!

Have what you want (disc brakes do feel way better IMO) - and I, previously, couldn't stand the idea of a disc brake road bike; then I rode Ultgera disc brakes and found out how much nice they are than the Ultegra rim brakes I have!

 

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Ogi [157 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

There is a premium on disc brake bikes these days. If keen on it, couple of suggestions from my side:

Racier bikes:

1) Super Six Evo disc Ultegra model - Evans had a deal on it.

2) Focus Izalco Max disc/Cayo disc 2017 models - Swift Cycles.

3) Spesh Tarmac Comp/Elite disc - Evans.

4) Cervelo R3 Disc.

5) Felt FR3/FR2 disc - Wiggle.

Endurance (lots of choices):

1) Cannondale Synapse.

2) Spesh Roubaix.

3) BMC Roadmachine.

4) Trek Domane.

5) Cervelo C3 Disc.

6) Wilier GTR SL Endurance

If it was my money, I'd go for Super Six Evo, Focus Izalco Max or Felt.

O

 

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
wellsprop wrote:
deano802 wrote:

I understand everyones comments on discs, a lot tend to be from skilled cyclists, but from my experience of getting back on the bike a year ago after not riding since at school I feel they are an advantage. I find if descending on the hoods its just dangerous as you cant get enough pressure on the levers if needed, and even in the drops I have left it a bit too late going into a bend and ended up going wide and on the wrong side of the road. Does anyone need digital tv or radio when analogue will do, or you can still listen to music in mono but I prefer stereo. Do I need them? No, Do I want them? Yes

You're right on all accounts!

Have what you want (disc brakes do feel way better IMO) - and I, previously, couldn't stand the idea of a disc brake road bike; then I rode Ultgera disc brakes and found out how much nice they are than the Ultegra rim brakes I have!

 

 

I have gone and pulled the trigger on the 2017 aero this morning, hoping for delivery end of the week so I can get out on the weekend!

Out of interest what gearing have you got on the ultimate? Past year i've been riding 52/36 with a 11-32, I would need to change out to a med cage to put on the 32 cassette I have on the back, not sure it is worth it.

 

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deano802 [19 posts] 8 months ago
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Ogi wrote:

There is a premium on disc brake bikes these days. If keen on it, couple of suggestions from my side:

Racier bikes:

1) Super Six Evo disc Ultegra model - Evans had a deal on it.

2) Focus Izalco Max disc/Cayo disc 2017 models - Swift Cycles.

3) Spesh Tarmac Comp/Elite disc - Evans.

4) Cervelo R3 Disc.

5) Felt FR3/FR2 disc - Wiggle.

Endurance (lots of choices):

1) Cannondale Synapse.

2) Spesh Roubaix.

3) BMC Roadmachine.

4) Trek Domane.

5) Cervelo C3 Disc.

6) Wilier GTR SL Endurance

If it was my money, I'd go for Super Six Evo, Focus Izalco Max or Felt.

O

 

 

Thanks, I've gone for the canyon now but did have a look at the supersix, lookswise just doesn't really do it for me. Another one to look at was the Giant TCR which would have been my second choice, great frame and giants own carbon rims etc plus you do get the backup of the lbs.

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