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Oakley removes the frame for an unobstructed view of the road ahead

Last year Oakley released the bold new Jawbreaker sunglasses, and now the US company has followed them up with the launch of these new EVZero frameless glasses.

The best thing about the Jawbreaker glasses is that the top of the frame is pushed higher up so it doesn’t obscure your vision as much as the frame on regular sunglasses. The new EVZero look to take this idea a step further. They do away with the frame completely, which should offer even less vision obstruction, particularly when riding in the drops in an aggressive head-down position. 

oakley EVZero 4.jpg

oakley EVZero 4.jpg

 

“Built for speed and engineered to be the ultimate multi-sport sunglass for training, running and beyond, EVZero™ Path is Oakley’s lightest performance frame and features a toric shield of Plutonite in a rimless design for an unobstructed view,” says Oakley.

oakley EVZero 3.jpg

oakley EVZero 3.jpg

Oakley of course isn’t the first company do offer frameless eyewear and there have been plenty of other examples over the years. I remember Specialized doing some frameless glasses way back in 2006 that weighed just 16g and were great for racing. And there are many more recent examples.

The lack of a frame not only benefits vision but the weight on the scales as well. They weigh a claimed 22g with the Path lens. A larger Range lens increases the weight to 24g. For comparison, the Jawbreaker come in at 60g, so that’s a significant weight saving.

oakley EVZero 2.jpg

oakley EVZero 2.jpg

Being able to change lenses is a key part of the current RadarLock and Jawbreaker models, but it’s not clear if the new EVZero allows lenses to be changed. That lack of any mention of lens changing suggests it’s not something that is possible with this new product.

The new EVZero glasses are priced from £130-170 depending on the lens. The latest Path Prizm Road lens version costs £140. More at http://uk.oakley.com

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.