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Architect from Essex hit 217.7 kilometres an hour - and now he has the world record in his sights

Essex-based architect Neil Campbell has set a new European motor-assisted cycling speed record of  217.7 kilometres an hour (135.5 miles an hour).

He broke the existing record of 204 kilometres an hour (127 miles an hour) over a 200 metre timed section after being towed up to speed behind a Porsche 4x4 on the runway at Elvingrton airfield in North Yorkshire yesterday.

The 44-year-old broke Guy Martin’s British record in 2016, riding a converted 20-year-old tandem to a speed of 183.8 kilometres an hour (114.19 miles an hour).

> Operation Pacemaker breaks Guy Martin's GB motor-paced speed record

The bike he used in yesterday’s successful record attempt was made by Wybunbury, Cheshire-based Moss Bikes and incorporated 3D-printed parts.

It was unveiled earlier this year at the Bespoked show in Bristol. and Moss Bikes has uploaded pictures of it to its Instagram account.

Campbell’s speed also eclipsed the 202 kilometres an hour (125 miles an hour) achieved by Brazil’s Evandro Portela last year, when he set a Guinness World Record for the highest speed ever achieved on a public road.

> Video: Watch Evandro Portela's record-breaking 202 kilometre an hour ride

According to ITV.com, Campbell now has his sights set on the 268.8 kilometres an hour (167 miles an hour) world motor-paced record  set at Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, United States, by Fred Rompelberg of the Netherlands in October 1995.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.