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Italian flair and passion for cycling means the country produces some utterly lovely bikes

Coppi, Bianchi, Campagnolo, pasta, coffee... yes, Italy is the spiritual home of cycling. There’s a high appreciation for Italian bicycles among passionate cyclists, and for some people, nothing says cycling more than an Italian bike equipped with Italian components. We've picked 12 lovely examples from Bianchi, Colnago, De Rosa, Legend, Bottecchia, Sarto, Cipollini, Olympia, Pinarello, Wilier and Cinelli.

A multitude of bike brands emerged out of the embers of the second world war, including Pinarello, Colnago, and De Rosa, producing bikes which have been ridden to many race victories over the years.

It’s fair to say the Italians have built themselves a reputation for road bikes that are special in a way that no other nationality has managed. If you own an Italian road bike, you tell people that you own an Italian road bike. Nobody boasts about their bike being from any other country in quite the same way. The fact that a bike is from an Italian brand gives it a certain degree of reverence, which is why Italian manufacturers rarely miss the opportunity to stick a tricolore on a frame tube.

>>5 reasons why you should ride in Italy right now

This then is a collection of some of the finest Italian road bikes we've ever featured on road.cc, and you can find out more about each bike by clicking on the heading.

Bianchi Specialissima — frameset £3,899.99

Bianchi Specialissima.jpg

Bianchi Specialissima.jpg

In a world of aero shaped frames, there’s something undeniably classical looking about the Specialissima. But under the Celeste paint (other colours are available) lurks a state-of-the-art carbon fibre layup, delivering a frame weight of just 780g and a smooth ride thanks to the Italian company’s CounterVail tech.

Read our Specialissima review here

Colnago C60 — frameset £3,599-£3,850

Colnago C60 - full bike

Colnago C60 - full bike

It might look traditional beside more modern carbon road bikes, but the hand-built tube and lugged construction of the C60 ensures the performance and ride quality is one of the most refined we’ve ever tested here at road.cc. It might be eye-wateringly expensive but the ride is simply superb and it really is in a class of its own.

Read our Colnago C60 review to find out why we like it so much

De Rosa SK Pininfarina — £3,060

derosa sk.png

derosa sk.png

De Rosa has collaborated with legendary design firm Pininfarina to develop the latest version of its Super King road bike, its first proper aero road offering. The frame is all curves and it’s been shaped in a wind tunnel and is made from a mix of 60, 24, 40 and 30-ton carbon to balance the needs of stiffness and comfort.

Pinarello Dogma F10 — £9,250

p17_dogmaf10_167_011_3.jpg

p17_dogmaf10_167_011_3.jpg

Developed in collaboration with Team Sky, the Dogma F10 follows on from the highly-acclaimed F8, on which Chris Froome won the Tour de France. The F10 uses FlatBack tube profiles, a Kamm Tail sort of shape, with a rounded leading edge and chopped tail. Pinarello has also lowered the seat tube water bottle cage and it’s further shielded by the down tube. Meanwhile, up front the fork has been derived from the company’s Bollide time trial bike with an aerodynamic shape, and the crown closely nestles into a recess in the down tube.

Find a Pinarello dealer
Read our review of the Dogma F8 here.

Wilier Cento10Air — Ultegra complete bike £4,999

Wilier Cento10Air - 10.jpg

Wilier Cento10Air - 10.jpg

The Cento10Air is the latest aero bike from the Italian company which is celebrating its 125th birthday, is available in a number of Shimano and Campagnolo builds.

- Wilier Cento10Air unveiled — faster, lighter and more comfortable aero road bike

Bottecchia Emme 695 — from £7,599 with Dura-Ace

Bottecchia 75S

Bottecchia 75S

If you’re a weight weenie, look no further than the Emme 695 from storied Italian brand Bottecchia. It’s the company’s range-topping model and has been designed for competition, so the geometry is definitely race focused. The frame is handmade in Italy using a tube-to-tube process and it’s packing the latest features. It has a pressfit 86 bottom bracket and tapered head tube with a 1 1/2in lower bearing diameter.

Olympia Ego RS — complete bike from £1,656

Olympia Ego RS

Olympia Ego RS

Olympia has been making bikes 1893 so they’ve got the heritage that appeals to cyclists wanting to buy an Italian bike, it’s just a shame they don’t get more representation in the UK. The Olympia Ego RS is one of the company’s more affordable models and we were very impressed when we tested it, with a delightful grace and a good turn of speed.

Read our review

Sarto Asola — frameset £3,600

Sarto Asola.jpg

Sarto Asola.jpg

Not the most instantly recognisable Italian bicycle brand but Sarto has been hand building frames since the 1950s and has a long track record making frames for other premium bicycle brands. More recently it has emerged from the shadows to market its own products. While the large majority of Italian brands have shipped carbon frame production to the Far East, Sarto prides itself on making its own frames. The Asola here is a lightweight frame with pleasingly traditional round tube profiles but thoroughly modern details like internal cable routing and a tapered head tube.

Read our review of the Sarto Asola

Cipollini NK1K — frameset £4,400

CIPOLLINI NK1K Direct Mount Frameset

CIPOLLINI NK1K Direct Mount Frameset

It's loud and rather representative of its creator, Mario Cipollini. When Stu reviewed the NK1K he said "it is a pure performance machine that also happens to be stunning to look at, with a real focus on the details. It's an engineering exercise that seems to bring passion to the mix, so if you want a frameset you can thrash about on and your pockets are deep enough, the Cipollini should find a place in your shed."

Read our review of the Cipollini NK1K

Legend HT 7.5 — frameset £3,399

Legend HT7.5 - full bike.jpg

Legend HT7.5 - full bike.jpg

One of a small handful of bicycle manufacturers still manufacturing in Italy, Legend work in most frame materials but it’s their carbon fibre frames that are the highlight. They’re based in Bergamo and head framebuilder Marco Bertoletti has been building frames since the 80s and started in carbon in 2003. The HT 7.5 is a custom built carbon beauty made using the tube-to-tube manufacturing process where mitred tubes are bonded together and the joints wrapped with carbon.

Read our review

Cinelli Laser Mia — frameset £3,300

Cinelli Laser frameset

Cinelli Laser frameset

Fabled Italian brand Cinelli brought back an iconic bike from their past in the shape of the Laser which came out in the 1990s. With fillet-brazed steel tubes and curved lugs, it was a track back that looked futuristic and like it was made from carbon. The Laser Mia is that bike reimagined, in carbon fibre this time and with gears, and the same metallic blue finish. The original bike was built in response to the UCI's declaration that aerodynamic features must be an integral part of the frame and fork. Aero features that are still being talked of as revolutionary in 2014, Cinelli were doing 20 years ago.

Bianchi Oltre XR4 — frameset £3,400

Bianchi Oltre XR4.jpg

Bianchi Oltre XR4.jpg

Okay, so it's a bonus Bianchi for you, but we felt we just had to include the Oltre XR4. It's a bike built for racing and pure speed, with a frame shaped to be extremely aerodynamic to maximise your pace when pushing serious watts. But thanks to the use of the company's patented CounterVail technology, the Oltre XR4 won't beat you up on imperfect roads.

Read our review of the Bianchi Oltre XR4 here.

These are all money no object bikes, so if you won the lottery which would you pick?

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

11 comments

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steviemarco [236 posts] 2 months ago
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Drool-fest

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TheDoctor [223 posts] 2 months ago
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Apart from the C60, Legend and Sarto, (or cipollini??) are any of the others actually made in Italy.?

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DBMel [4 posts] 2 months ago
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No Basso? Beautiful bikes and the framesets still made in Italy.

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guyrwood [894 posts] 2 months ago
3 likes

I'm sorry, there's an Oltre XR4 there, I didn't spot any other bikes smiley.

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Rapha Nadal [521 posts] 2 months ago
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That full Ultegra Wilier is actually full Campagnolo!

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ajd [62 posts] 2 months ago
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I love the Pinarello, but is it me or do those forks just not fit properly with the frame at the crown? Saw one in the shop today and they look like they were designed by different people from the frame. Big gap and no consistent lines between the 2. Everyone else gets it right. Other than that, it looks great.

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Butty [196 posts] 2 months ago
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Aren't Sky already on the F10 this year?

If so then the F8 write up is from last year.

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Chris Hayes [123 posts] 2 months ago
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My C50 glides and is nailed to the ground when cornering at speed and there's still not much out there that feels as composed.  I was loaned a Cento10 recently, which was superb, but I felt a sigh of relief when I got back on my Colnago... I'd always thought it would be replaced with another Colnago, but the lines on that Specialissima.... There's something about celeste...

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MandaiMetric [125 posts] 2 months ago
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As someone said above, most of this is massmarket far east carbon lay up  stuff. 

I'd prefer a Passoni, but then I prefer to just ride than race.

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joules1975 [456 posts] 2 months ago
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I know this is a cycling website, and that accuracy/fact checking is sometimes a little lacking, but I think you'll find Pininfarina are NOT a famous car design firm. They are an italian design company that in amongst it's many projects happen to be a number of famous cars.

Compared to some of their projects, the De Rosa would seem to be nothing more than a five minute distraction for a bored employee.

http://www.pininfarina.com/en/homepage/homepage.htm

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MrGold [7 posts] 2 months ago
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No Basso? Buuuu