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‘This is awkward’ says rider as he posts footage in response to cabbie’s tweet

A Dublin taxi driver who tweeted a picture this morning criticising a cyclist’s road positioning got a bit more than he bargained for – when the very same cyclist replied to his post with footage of the same incident shot from the rear-facing camera on his bike.

The original picture from Twitter user @Taximattdublin showed the cyclist ahead of him, riding primary as he prepared to turn right at a set of traffic lights.

The cabbie, in a reference to the adjacent cycle lane on the left hand-side of the road, wrote: “Now if only there was somewhere safe for this cyclist to cycle … ”

In his reply the cyclist, @AlanDub13, said: “This is awkward,” adding a laughing emoji.

“I stay central there because some drivers (yourself included) can’t seem to keep out of the cycle lane as they go round the bend,” he explained.

“Glad you still made the light while tweeting, although traffic wasn't moving so it didn’t make much difference.”

Indeed, the video shows that after turning right, Alan was able to swiftly move past the queue of motor traffic that had built up after the junction.

In what turned out to be a good-natured exchange by the usual standards of interaction between cyclists and taxi drivers on the social network, TaxiMatt said, “I take your points on board” and added that he had been using a dashcam and had pulled in safely to tweet the picture.

He added: “I definitely have gathered more insight as to why a cyclist would position themselves here and I thank Alan for posting his side.”

It's fair to say though that a number of Twitter users took some delight in the cabbie been pulled up on his original tweet thanks to the video provided by the very cyclist he was criticising.

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.