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Video: Graeme Obree eat your heart out - Deliveroo makes bike out of unused kitchen gadgets

Food delivery firm highlights how many items lie unused in the cupboards of Britain’s homes

​Graeme Obree famously set the Hour record on a bike that included parts from an old washing machine, and pressed an old saucepan into service for his more recent attempt on the human-powered vehicle world record – but Deliveroo have taken the DIY ethos a bit further, creating a bike that includes no fewer than 34 unused kitchen gadgets.

As the video above shows, there are all kinds of weird and wonderful components in the bike, which has been given the name the Upcycle – including a rolling pin acting as handlebars, can openers instead of brake levers and potato mashers for the pedals, and even a grill for the seat.

Sean Miles of Design Works, who put the bike together complete with a worktop acting as a frame, even included an old microwave to add a bit of storage space.

There are obviously some actual bike-specific components in there, such as front forks, presumably because salad forks wouldn’t cut the mustard, as it were.

Research conducted by Deliveroo found that among the least-used kitchen gadgets in the UK – worth £267 in the average household – are slow-cookers, pastry brushes and pizza cutters (come on, hands up any of you who have received a Park Tools one as a Christmas gift because, you know, cycling?).

As rides go, we’re guessing the Upcycle isn’t as sleek as the Pinarello Dogma that road.cc reader Gila Joffe Overton spotted in Reading last year – complete with rider in full Team Sky kit and, er, trainers.

Team Sky Deliveroo.jpg

> The fastest fast food? Deliveroo rider in full Team Sky kit on a Pinarello

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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