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Apply now for a chance to be a part of Women on Wheels 2017

Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) has launched Women on Wheels 2017, an attempt to close the gender gap in cycling.

Men currently outnumber women cyclists four to one in the UK when it comes to cycling to work, so TfGM is investigating ways to encourage more women onto two wheels next year.

If your New Year’s resolution is to see women ride more, you can apply to be one of a range of Greater Manchester cycle clubs, groups and organisations which are being given the chance to apply for funding towards events and activities.

The month-long celebration of cycling takes place throughout March 2017 and events can be aimed at encouraging complete beginners to give cycling a go, right through to encouraging existing cyclists to cycle more often.

Hundreds of people across the region took part in last year’s Women on Wheels campaign, with some events selling out almost immediately.

Keen cyclist Ann Butler helped organise an event for women’s cycling group Burnden Belles last year. She said: “The day was a huge success. We were inundated with ladies wanting to attend, some even buying their first bike, or replacing their old one, especially for the event.

“One lady had a mechanical fault with her bike whilst riding home and was able to fix it herself with what she'd learnt.”

TfGM Head of Logistics, Environment and Active Travel, Helen Smith, said: “Previous Women on Wheels events have proven to be extremely popular, with hundreds of people signing up for over 60 events across the region this year alone, and we want to build on that success in 2017.

“Getting people cycling helps them to live happier, longer and healthier lives and also makes our towns and cities nicer places to live.”

The closing date for funding applications is 4pm on Friday 13 January 2017. Only one application will be accepted per group, for a maximum of £400.

For more information on how to apply, contact the TfGM Cycling team on 0161 244 1000 (select option 4) or email cycling [at] tfgm.com.

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.