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Charity cycling event on TdF route in Yorkshire has a totally new format - you be the judge of your ability

It’s a race against the clock with a difference. Like Cinderella, you’ll be having a ball on the route of the Tour de France in Yorkshire - but it’s down to you how far to go because your deadline is midnight.

In aid of Sue Ryder, this new charity cycling event in Yorkshire has a totally new format. Most rides have set distances and success is judged by time. In this ride however it is the distance that you choose that's the critical factor in your personal challenge. 
  
It is your choice how far along the route you dare continue, knowing that once you have marked the furthest point you get to you have to turn around and come back to the start point by midnight.

If you attach your personalised cable tie on a lampost too soon and arrive back well before twelve you'll wish you'd have gone that extra bit further.

But if you bite off more than you can chew and don't get back by midnight the distance you ride will be crossed off the results sheet with a 'post midnight pumpkin' (a no score).

People can sign up as individuals or teams of four - making the decision of where to turn around even more interesting.
 
Riders can choose from whether to take a 4 hour ride or a 2 hour ride. The four hour ride starts at 8pm and the first 4.8 miles of the 4 hour route has also been chosen to be quite tough to spread out the field. 
 
The two hour ride starts at 10pm and has an easier start than the four hour ride which starts at 8pm.
 
Riders will raise funds for Manorlands - a hospice in Oxenhope, and is being dedicated to the memory of Keighley bike enthusiast Frank O'Dwyer, who died earlier this month.

"Frank did a huge amount for Manorlands and was a big help to me in the planning of Midnight or Bust – an event which is a totally new concept," said Manorlands-based Sue Ryder fundraiser, Andrew Wood.

The event takes place on June 20. For more information, click here.
 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.