Home

Hi,

After a few good years of service, one of the nipple holes on my stock Axis road rear wheel broke. I'm not sure it is worth going to a bike shop to have it rebuilt as it is probably going to cost more than buying new equivalent, but I would be interested in actually rebuilding the wheel myself.

I know how to do basic truing, and I have the proper tools to adjust and measure the spoke tension. However I am not sure of which rim to buy? I can't really find an exact replacement of my rim, so can I buy a rim from another brand? It yes, what should I check before doing do? Rim height and width, and spoke number?

Should I look into also replacing the spokes, or keeping the original one should be fine? They don't look damaged or bent.

Thanks!

10 comments

Avatar
Duncann [1491 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

How many holes on your existing rim?

There's a good choice of 32 and 36 hole rims out there, and they're pretty interchangeable - a millimetre or two difference in the ERD (effective rim diameter) shouldn't be an issue for your current spokes. Something with many fewer holes or a deeper section / aero profile might be trickier to find.

Rim width is another variable where a bit more or less probably doesn't make a great deal of difference. There are online tables matching tyre and rim width - but you don't need to be too exact.

A good tip for swapping rims is to tape the new one to the old and swap the spokes over without dismantling the wheel. Saves a chunk of time.

Avatar
Aurelien [2 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I think it's actually 28 hole rims (rear wheel, if it makes any difference), but will need to double check when home. I was thus looking at something more like that: https://www.wiggle.co.uk/dt-swiss-r460-18mm-road-rim/

And thanks for the tip, will definitely try to make it efficient!  1

Avatar
Ad Hynkel [203 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Yes, you will definitely need to sus out what the ERD is on those existing rims. The advice is generally: don't buy the spokes til you have measured the ERD yourself and then calculate what length(s) they should be. Which gives you an idea of the trust people put in manufacturers figures for ERD, but also factors in the year by year changes that can be made to a rim design. Having done it myself, they are often a mm or so out. Though that could be my ropey coathanger measurement tool too...  1 The DT Swiss webpage for those rims currently says 596 mm. As Duncann says, if your exisiting rim is within a mm or two of that you'll be fine. Much more than either way and you risk running out of threads on the spoke or not enough to secure the nipples.

I have done a rear wheel rim swap once and it works with the above method, but did seem to be more of a faff getting things round and true than building a wheel from scratch with new spokes for some reason. Got there in the end. But was glad I had built a wheel beforehand as some of those techniques were useful. YMMV

Avatar
Boatsie [539 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Down here to build a wheel , costs are labour and material.
Eg.
Hub.
Spokes (?$2?$3? Each)
Rim.
Labour.

Avatar
DoctorFish [242 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I'm only here for the jokes about nipple holes.

Avatar
Boatsie [539 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
DoctorFish wrote:

I'm only here for the jokes about nipple holes.

Go 37 hole rims bro.. Prime number will balance oscillating true hence skiddies on the outside of crew.
 1 hoping your eating healthy doc.
Like cyclists that don't ride much wondering why a sub 10 kg bike isn't fast.
Modern medicine is often just market, effort of ease is good food and a happy mood although at start maybe a blast from the past.

Aye, you roll 29 hole rims bro. Love ya work.

Avatar
Nick T [1360 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes

You're quite strange, aren't you

Avatar
Boatsie [539 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Cheers.
Dude, primary numbers naturally balance circles.
Hence nipple holes are a go send. 28s, 36s would magically roll easier.
Basic algeBRA. Abracadabra
 3

Avatar
Argus Tuft [131 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

If it was my wheel,and only one spoke was involved,I'd make up an elongated "washer" about an inch long,and as wide as the hole in the outer wall of the rim (Assuming double wall rim)

Drill at a suitable angle and size to suit spoke nipple and countersink slightly at correct angle.

Bob's your uncle!

Avatar
mike the bike [1277 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Argus Tuft wrote:

If it was my wheel,and only one spoke was involved,I'd make up an elongated "washer" about an inch long,and as wide as the hole in the outer wall of the rim (Assuming double wall rim)

Drill at a suitable angle and size to suit spoke nipple and countersink slightly at correct angle.

Bob's your uncle!

 

I love a good bodge and this sounds a cracker sir, keep up the good work.

 

PS

Courtesy of the one-and-only and highly revered Mr Zinn - Always, always make sure new spokes are long enough to very nearly reach the end of the nipple threads.  The penalty for ignoring this advice is a high risk of a broken spoke.

He is never wrong.